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Full text of "Catalogue of the officers and students of Spiceland Academy : at Spiceland, Ind. for the year .."

REYNOLD^ wcTORfCffL 

GENEALOo'i COLLECTION 



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3 1833 01722 8468 



Digitized by the Internet Archive 

in 2014 



http://archive.org/details/catalogueofofficOOspic_0 




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Spieeland Academy, 



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. . THIRTY-SECOND . . 



CATALOGUE 



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Spiceland Academy 



Jt jt AND ^ 



NORMAL SCHOOL. 



FOR THE ACADEMIC YEAR 1900-1901 



TKHIL'M PRINTING CO., JIBW (' \ ST I , F".* IV J>» 



Officers and Faculty- 



Board of Trustees 

Elisha B. Ratcliff, President. 
Herbert T. Baily, Secretary. 
Martha E. S. Charles, Treasurer. 
O. H. Bogue. 
Terrell Wilson. 
Samuel E. Test. 



Instructors 

For the Academic Year I900-J90I 



Murray S. Wildman, Superintendent, 
Ph. B. Earlham College, 1898, 
Psychology and Science. 

H. C. Henderson, 
A. M. , University of New Brunswick, Canada, 
Psychology and Pedagogy. 

William M. Timmons, 
Indiana State Normal School, 1ft!* 7 . 
Mathematics and Pedagogy. 

Laura B. Laughman, 
Earlham College, A. B. 18Hy. 
Latin and, Elocution,. 

Bertha Butler, 

Librarian. 

Emily Weeks, 
Music. 



Calendar 



1901 

Fall Term begins Monday, September 2nd. 
Fall Term ends Friday, December 20th. 
Public Exercises of the First Year Class, De- 
cember 2ISt. 

Winter Term begins Monday December 30th. 
1902 

Spring Term begins Tuesday, April 1st. 
Field Day, June 13th. 
Commencement, June 20th. 



Spiceland Academy 



History 

gPICELAND ACADEMY is the oldest Academy 
in charge of Friends in Indiana. It was char- 
tered as an Academy in 1870, but its history as a 
Friends' school extends over a period of more than 
sixty years. It is under the control of Spiceland 
Monthly Meeting, by which body the Board of 
Trustees is appointed. The teachers are selected 
by the Trustees. While the school is under 
denominational control, it is not sectarian in the 
least; its foundation rests upon Christian culture. 
The first class was graduated in 1S70, and more than 
3,000 students have received instruction in the 
school since its organization as an Academy. 

Location 

Spiceland Academy is located in the beautiful 
town of Spiceland, Indiana, in the Southern part 
of Henry County, on the Lake Erie and Western 
Railroad, two miles north of Dunreith, on the 
Pennsylvania Railroad. The buildings are situated 
in the midst of a beautiful grove, adjoining which 
is a large campus, well adapted to athletic sports. 

Entrance 

Students may enter at any time, but students 
coming from other schools are required to bring 
certificates stating their literary and moral standing. 
In the absence of approved certificate, examinations 



5 



will be held and students classified accordingly. 
Classes in Grammar School branches are maintain- 
ed as demand may justify, affording opportunity for 
preparatory work to students who may not be eli- 
gible to regular academic standing. 

In general, graduates from the non-commission- 
ed high schools of this county can enter the Acad- 
emy with a credit of six terms' work. Three terms 
are usualty required to complete the course. 



The Course of Study 



The conditions for admission to the First Year 
class are the same as for entrance to the public high 
schools of this state. 

The work for the entire course is briefly out- 
lined as follows: 

First Year 
Fall Term 

Latin — First Lathi Book. (Collar aud Daniel). 

~- "Algebra — To Simple Equations, (Wells). 

— "English History — (Montgomery). 
^__*Exglish — Principles of Composition. 

Winter Term 

— Latin — (Continued). 

, - Algebra — To Radicals. 

Histokt — Civil Government in the United States. 
(Fiske). 
.-.-English — (Continued). 

Spring Term 

Latin — Chiefly Grammar and Composition . 
Algebra — To Progressions. 
ZooLony— ( Selected Text). 
English — Interpretation . 

"Students regularly classified for English and Literature will 1>« given 
class instruction in Elocution at leaat raicf a week through two term*. 
Ho extra charge will be made fur this work, 



V 



Second Year 
Fall Term 

-^Latin — Caesar's Commentaries. 

A Geometry — Two books, (Wentworth's). 

. T Physics — General Principles. 

*English — Original Composition. 

, Winter T«rm 

Latin — Ctesar's Commentaries. 
Geometry — Three books. 
~ History — Greece and Rome, (Myers) 

- — English — Composition. 

^ Spring Term 
Latin — Cresar, with sight reading. 
Geometry — Solid Geometry, (Wentworth). 
— .History — Mediaeval and Modern, (Myers). 
English — Composition and interpretation. 

Third Year 
Fall Term 

Latin — Cicero's Orations. 
Chemistry — (Cooley). 
Geology — (Le Conte). 
*Rhetoric — (Genung). 

Winter Term 

Latin — Virgil's Aeueid. 
r-v Astronomy — (Todd) . 
Political Economy — (Walker's Elementary Course). 
Literature — Study of English Classics. 

Spring Term 
Latin — Virgil continued. 
Psychology — (Halleck). 
Botany — ( Wood) . 

Literature — History of English literary periods and 
writers. 

Higher classes in any of the work will be formed 
whenever there is sufficient demand, and tuition will 
be charged at the same rate as for a third year study. 



'Students regularly classified for English and Literature will be given 
class instruction in Elocution at least once a week through two terms. 
No extra charge will be made for this work. 



7 



Satisfactory work in these studies may be substituted 
for work in the regular course at the discretion of 
the Superintendent. 

The above course of study has been prepared 
with reference to the needs of those students who 
do not expect to pursue a college course, but desire 
to acquire a knowledge of those branches which will 
fit them for active life. Special attention, 

HOWEVER, IS GIVEN TO PREPARING STUDENTS FOR 

college, and additional work in Latin, Mathematics 
and other subjects will be given when a sufficient 
number of pupils desire it. Graduates are urged to 
take a college course, and they will be admitted to 
any of the leading colleges in Indiana without 
examination. 

At the close of the winter term the members of 
the Second Year class hold an exhibition, for which 
each member prepares an essay or oration, and the 
public speakers are chosen from the number. 

Public exercises in declamation will be given by 
the First Year class at the end of the fall term. 

English 

Besides the usual work in English Grammar, 
special attention is paid to English Composition, 
which is preparatory to the work in Rhetoric. This 
consists of a study of grammatical purity, choice 
and use of words, and kinds of composition, with 
practical exercises. English and American Litera- 
ture receive careful attention. 

Latin 

In order to receive a diploma a student must 
have done three years' work in Latin, or, in special 
cases, equivalents may be taken to fit the student for 



> 



8 



college. Thorough drill on the declension of nouns, 
adjectives and the conjugation of verbs is given, also 
on the application of the rules of construction and 
the acquiring of a vocabulary. The derivation of 
English words is studied, and in the advanced work 
exercises in sight reading and Latin composition are 
given. It is the purpose to invest all the work in 
Latin with a living spirit that it may be a means of 
genuine literary culture as well as mental discipline. 

The "First Latin Book," by Collar & Daniel, is 
used as a text in the First Year class. Any of the 
standard editions of the Latin classics may be used 
in the subsequent work. 

History 

A thorough foundation is laid in General His- 
tory, English History, Civil Government and 
Political Economy. It is the purpose of this course 
to reveal the various steps by which the great insti- 
tutions have developed and grown from early times 
until the present. 

Science 

The Academy is supplied with sufficient appara- 
tus to be a valuable aid in the study of the natural 
sciences. In Natural Philosophy the subject is illus- 
trated by many simple pieces of apparatus, besides 
the air pump, electrical machine, batteries, etc. In 
chemistry students do practical work in the labora- 
tory, which is supplied with necessary chemicals 
and apparatus. Geology and Mineralogy are illus- 
trated by a collection of more than twelve hundred 
specimens, presented to the Academy by the Alumni. 
In Zoology and Botany, animals and plants are 
studied from nature, and sj'stems of classifications 



9 



are made prominent. In all the sciences objects 
are used as much as possible. 

Mathematics 

The aim in this study is to introduce the stu- 
dent to mathematical methods and to develop in 
him the power to reason clearly and accurately on 
any given problem. Algebra is studied throughout 
the first year of the High School, Geometry durin°- 
the second year. A great deal of supplementary 
work is given in Algebra and original exercises are 
introduced as much as possible in Geometry. As- 
tronomy is studied during the winter term of the 
third year. In this subject the work is largely de- 
scriptive. A good six-inch telescope belongs to the 
Academy. 

Literary Exercises 

Literary exercises are required of students in 
all grades, both in class work and before the pub- 
lic. Care is used that students may learn the art of 
composition and public delivery. Essays and dec- 
lamations are a part of the regular school work. 

Oratory and Elocution 

There is a regular organized Oratorical Asso- 
ciation which is associated with similar organiza- 
tions of students of Fairmount, Central and West- 
field Academies in the Inter-Academic Oratori-al 
Association of Indiana. In each school a contest 
is held in oratory and declamation. The successful 
contestant in each department represents his school 
in an Inter-Academic contest held in April. 



Libraries 

Four sets of Encyclopedias are in the school- 
rooms, and these, with the dictionaries and numer- 
ous reference books, are for the free use of all. 
There are three libraries in connection with the 
school, which comprise about three thousand vol- 
umes, two of them belonging to the Literary So- 
ciety, and the other to the Academy Association. 
Additions are made each year. 



Normal Department 



For several years past special arrangements 
have been made to give those students desiring to 
teach, the opportunity of normal instruction during 
the spring term. A special normal instructor has 
been employed and many students of this and ad- 
joining counties have availed themselves of this op- 
portunity. 

The increasing demand for normal work and 
for a more extended course than can be given dur- 
ing the spring term, has induced the board to add a 
normal department that provides for a full year's 
work of three terms as follows: 



Fall ;T <-rm. . . 


1st Crraiiim'r 


1st Arithmetic IstU.S. History | Physiology 

! -I 


Winter T'rm 


2d Grammar 


! ! 
2d Arithmetic -'dtJ.S. History jlst Geography 


Spring Term 


Method 


Heading J Psychology j2d Geography 



In the fall term classes will be organized with 
the view of continuing the work throughout the 



1 1 

year. During the winter term those hav ing started 
in the fall will advance to the next work in the 
course. 

In the spring term classes will be provided for 
those beginning the normal work, and for those who 
have done one term's work. It is thus seen that all 
the legal branches, Psychology and Method may be 
had in the spring term. 

It is not the purpose of high schools to give 
students a teacher's knowledge of the legal branches. 
However, it is known that many high school gradu- 
ates desire to teach. This course of normal work 
is especially fitted for this class of students, and for 
students having graduated from common schools, 
who wish to get a more comprehensive knowledge 
of the legal branches, and learn correct methods of 
teaching them. Psychology, Pedagogy and Method 
will be given to make work characteristically pro- 
fessional. 

In the normal course it is not intended to con- 
duct a scheme of cramming for examination, but it 
is our intention to help teachers in their schools 
quite as much as to aid them to get licenses. 

Work will be so arranged that students who 
desire to take part academic work and part normal 
work will be accommodated. 

General Items 

The government of the school is based upon 
the idea that manhood is more than scholarship; 
that self-respect and self-control on the part of the 
student are important factors in the formation of 
character. Greater stress is laid upon the thorough- 



12 



13 



aess of instruction and accuracy of knowledge than 
upon rapidity of advancement. 

A daily class record of the work of each pupil 
is kept. This record and the final examination de- 
termine the recorded grade. 

For many years the health of students has been 
uniformly good. There is probably no better loca- 
tion in the state in this respect. 

The Friends and Methodists both hold religious 
services on the Sabbath and each maintains a Sab- 
bath-school. Meetings of the Young People's So- 
ciety of Christian Endeavor and the Epworth 
League are held every Sabbath evening, and stu- 
„ dents are welcomed to their meetings and member- 
ship. 

A sufficient number of teachers is constantly 
employed, so that large classes may be avoided, and 
students may receive personal attention during the 
recitation. 

Expenses are as low as at any other school 
affording equal advantages. 

The managers of the school are very careful to 
make this an institution in which students who are 
away from home and its restraints, will be sur- 
rounded by good, moral influences, and in this the\ 
have the co-operation of the citizen's of the village. 

There are no beer, liquor or billiard saloons in 
the village. 

No student whose influence is known to have 
a corrupting tendency will be retained in the school. 

Diploma 

Students whose conduct is exemplary, and who 
complete the course of study and prepare and de- 



liver a suitable literary production, will be furnished 
a diploma, signed by the instructors and the Presi- 
dent of the Board of Trustees. 

Lectures 

Students have the opportunity to hear good 
lectures at small expense. Addresses on various 
subjects are given during the year by able speakers. 

Expenses 



Rates of Tuition 



Grammar School, . . four studies, 


75 cts per week 


First Year Academic, for each study, 


4 < « < i < 

20 


Second Year Academic, 


22>2 


Third Year Academic, 


i i U ( t 

2 5 ■ 


Normal Classes, 


25 " " " 



Students who enter at irregular times will be 
charged full tuition for the term in case they com- 
plete the term's work in such manner as to receive 
credit toward the diploma. 

Normal students and others who may not ex- 
pect to earn credit in the regular course will be 
charged only for the time of actual enrollment in 
classes. 

Occasionally those who are especially strong 
are permitted to earn credits by outside study un- 
der the supervision of the teachers. For such 
credits as these one-half the regular tuition will be 
charged. 

Tuition is due at the opening of each term and 
settlement should be made with the Superintend- 
ent or the Treasurer of the Board of Trustees. 



14 
Boarding 

The citizens of Spiceland have always given 
the students a hearty welcome by receiving them in- 
to their homes. The cost of boarding and rooms in 
private families where everything is furnished can 
be had for $2.50 to $3.00 a week. Rooms both fur- 
nished and unfurnished can be had for from 2^ to 
50 cents a week, and table board of excellent quality 
at the rate of $1.50 to $2.00 for the full week. 

Thus persons who may live near enough to go 
home at the end of each week and who wish to 
economize may reduce the cost of living to a very 
small sum. 




15 



LIST OF STUDENTS. 



SENIOR CLASS. 



Bell, Ira E. 
Butler, Bertha E. 
Byrket, Raymond 
Compton, Jennie 
Cope, Everett 
Edwards, Deborah 
Edwards, Ethel 
Hayes, Lillian O. 
Harvey, Walter B. 
Hinshaw, John R. 
Macy, Everett 



Millikan, Georgia 
Millikan, Jennie E. 
Nugen, Homer E. 
Risk, Cora E. 
Roberts, Robert A. 
Smith, Manning J. 
Stewart, Grace E. 
Wright, Russell L. 
Wilson, Walter C. 
*Ward. Clara 



JUNIOR CLASS. 



Anderson, Harley 
Baily, Jessie 
Beckett, Nellie 
Beeson, Josephine 
Black, Alnetta 
Butler, Mary 
Byers, Walter 
Edwards, Flora M. 
Gilbreath, Maud 
Griffin, Horace C. 
Gordon, Jessie L. 
Haisley, Fred 

FIRST 

Adams, Goldie 
Baldwin, Clarence 
Baldwin, Howard 
Bell, Elsie 
Brewer, Karl 
Burt, William 
Bucy, Netta 
English, Ratie 
Harrold, Blanch 



Harrold, Ethel M. 
Johnson, Arthur 
Kirk, Jennie 
Lane, Eva 
Lindamood, Harry 
Newby, Paul 
Nugen, Linnie 
Seaford, Howard 
Seaford, Herbert 
Wilson, Russell 
Yost. India Anna 

YEAR CLASS. 

Munden, Belva 
Newby, Carl 
Painter, Anna M. 
Painter, Floyd 
Redin, Rupert B. 
Rifner, Etta M. 
Shepherd, Frank 
Shepherd, Nellie 
Strattan, Anna M. 



'Deceased. 



[6 



Hoover, Claire 
Jones, Barton E. 
Lane, Alvia 
Meredith, Joie 



Stubbs, Ralph 
Taylor, Jesse 
Wood, Minnie B. 
Yockey, Harrold. 



NORMAL STUDENTS. 



Anderson, Pearl 
Burt, Irene 
Conwell, James C. 
Carter, Benjamin 
Davis, Edgar N. 
Griffin, Pearl D. 
Griffin, Connie 
Haynes, Clyde 
Healton, Alonzo V 
Kerr, Tilman W. 

Anderson, Elsie 
Bazzle, Evere.tt 
Beckett, Clare 
Bowles, Raymond 
Bower, Chester 
Denner, Grace 
Hoover, Clifford 
Hodson, Arlie E. 
Hinshaw, Evert M. 
Lane, Nellie 



Lawrence, Bertha O. 
Mills, Carroll J. 
Pearson, Bertha 
Rifner, Jeanette 
Rifner, Ethel 
Stafford, Mayme 
Trees, George H. 
Walker, Owen M. 
Wilkinson, Tweeda 



IRREGULAR. 



Painter, Myron 
Poarch, Fay 
Randall, Orlando 
Reeves, Paul 
Stewart, Clayton 
Smalley Gertrude 
Stafford, VV. Merritt 
Stevenson, Frank 
Thompson, John R. 



ALUMNI. 



1870. 

*Eli U. Cook 

John J. Stubbs Omaha, Neb 



♦Deceased. 



17 



1871. 



Walter D. Jones Dayton, Ohio. 

*Alvin H. Jenkins 

*I. Macy Good 

C. R. Dixon Lawrence, Kan. 

R. G. Boone Cincinnati, Ohio. 

Dallas Sisson Spiceland. 

Mary Ballenger (Barnard) New Castle. 

Louisa Wickersham Lewisville. 

Lida Edwards (Saint ) New Castle. 

1872. 

Lindley H. Johnson Dunreith. 

David Henley Spiceland. 

*Jacob Hill 

Henry W. Painter Spiceland. 

Robert G. Mitchell Pacific Grove. Cal 

1873. 

*Sadie D. Talbert (Wright) 

Aaron B. Bell Springtown, Kan. 

*J. Tilman Hutchins 

John Pennington Providence, R. I. 

Mary Stubbs (Painter) Spiceland. 

Nathan Williams Oswego, Kan. 

Carrie Talbert (Newby) ..Wichita, Kan. 

1874- 

Alice Coffin (Russell) St. Louis, Mo. 

Elvira Spencer (Harrold) Indianapolis. 

J. P. Edwards Spiceland. 

William S. Moffit .Kennard. 

Edwin O. Kennard Pasadena, CaJ. 

Nathan Rosenberger Muscatine, Iowa. 

W. E. Jackson Knightstown. 

D- C. Mitchell Spiceland. 

1875 

W. W. Gregg Chicago, 111. 



♦Deceased. 



i8 



Wm. Pidgeon Richland, Iowa. 

Irvin Stanley Westfield. 

1877 

Milton Roberts Lynnville, Iowa. 

1878 

S. Ella Bogue (Dogget) Danville, Va. 

Belle Chambers (Estes) New Castle 

J Pinkney Mitchell Fresno, Cal. 

Thomas Mitchell Knightstown. 

Flora Moore (Brady) Indianapolis. 

John O. Reed E. Saginaw, Mich 

William S. Seaford Spiceland. 

Fannie Thornburg (Parsons) Oak Park, 111. 

1879. 

J. A. Buck Muncie. 

Carrie Goodwin (Jeffrey) New Castle. 

Thomas Newlin Wilmington, O. 

1 8S0. 

J. Edgar Cloud Chicago, 111. 

Wm. N.Lamb • San Francisco. 

Mattie Lamb Outland Amboy. 

Ada Grace Murphey New Castle. 

Ida May Roberts Irvington. 

Emma Belle Roberts Sun River, Mont. 

Frank Symons Portland, Me. 

Lamira Trueblood Kellum ) Friendswood. 

1S81 

Oscar R. Baker Winchester. 

¥ Corrie Bogue 

Minnie Benedict 1 Blankenship) . .Paragon. 

Carrie Unthank 'Kellum") Indianapolis. 

*Jesse -Strattan 

18S2. 

* Arthur H. Baily 

Deceased. 



19 



J. Newton Barnard Middletown. 

Harriet Bogue (Newlin) Irvington. 

Hattie E. Dickinson ...Spiceland. 

Charles Newlin Irvington. 

1883 

Anna Hudelson (Foster) Wash'ton, D.C. 

Ryland Ratliff Fairmount. 

Julia Stafford (Newby) Greensboro. 

Emily Weeks Mechanicsburg . 

1884 

*Cora Kirk 

Ella Strattan [Hodson] Spiceland. 

Virginia Griffin [Cory] Dunreith. 

Isadore Hall [Wilson] Spiceland. 

William Julian Juniata, Neb. 

Charles Newby Chicago, 111. 

1885 

Mary L. Brown [Pennington] . . . .Spiceland. 

Alfred Y. King Weaver. 

Oliver C. Steele Spiceland. 

18S6 

L Winnie [Bail} ] Clement Haddonfield, N. J 

Mattie E. Brown Daytona, Fla. 

Richard Broadbent Elwood. 

Elbert Griffin Elwood. 

Alonzo C. Hodson Spiceland. 

*John L. McNew 

Russell Ratliff Marion. 

1887 

Herbert T. Bailey Spiceland. 

Clarence H. Beard New Castle 

Anna K. Bogue [Shaffer] B. Harbor, Mich 

Lindley Compton Tomah, Wis. 



-Deceased. 



20 



Lizzie S. Hiatt Omaha, Neb. 

Abram Miller Kennard. 

Bert Smith Zionville. 

1888 

Rhoda Ballenger [Cunningham] . . Indianapolis. 

Hannah Brown [Stribbing] Dexter, Iowa. 

Oryntha Brown, [Jester] Payton, Iowa. 

Jessie Butler Lewisville. 

Clara G. Edwards [Knight] St. Louis, Mo. 

John C. Cook Greensboro. 

Elva Elliott [Compton] Tomah, Wis. 

Achsah E. Ratctiff New Castle. 

H. H. Ratcliff Spiceland. 

H. H. Rayl Muncie. 

Charles Stubbs Spiceland. 

J. A. Greenstreet New Castle. 

1889 

Laura Benedict Springport. 

Blanch Braddock [McNew] Greenfield. 

Frank Copeland : Dunreith. 

Estella Deem Spiceland- 

Lawrence Gardner Spiceland. 

Gertrude Gordon [Genaux] Wilkinson- 
Sue Griffin [Evans] Spiceland. 

Otis Stubbs Lewisville. 

Mary White Pasadena, Cal. 

1890 

L "Etta Butler Lewisville 

Elmer Deem Spiceland 

Edwin B. Ratcliff Spiceland 

Bennie Strattan Spiceland 

S. E. Stubbs Wilkinson 

1891 

Ethel M. Copeland Chicago, 111 

Louie Edmundson [Poe] Knightstown 

Maurine Gardner Spiceland 



21 



Charles N. Hardy MsH.-W;n 

Alfred H. Svmons Maxwell 

Mary M.Teas f^tf 

Charles Titus ...Irvmgton 
Herber, n w' 'a " i ^ arnngton 

Herbert D. \\ oodard Fountain City 

1 892 

Jesse S. Bailv. ... n . m r , 

Clara Brown Denver Col 
Warren T. Evans 

JohnB. Greenstreet::::: LewisS e ' ^ 
Windie Hinshaw rMilHi.nl v^l™ 
David M 
ce C. I 
tella S 

' in UInch ••••.••••••.'•'•'.''.'•'.'.■.Greensboro 



Dav^^ 

AliV P r t p Kempton 
Kst?IT?"i VrenCG Cleveland, O 



Oscar Bogue c • 1 j 

Estella Charles Sp.ce and 
Floy Hill... L p ' Cea " C ' , 

Arthur Hoiiowav .' . ! ! . : : : ; ] ; ; ; ; ; ; S 

Spate 

^Riyi..:,:::::::::::::::::::^^ 

beorw Smith n 1 

1894 

Minnie Black [Moore] Chicago, 111 

Bessie I. Brown Sniref-nVl 

Clarence V. Hall Sp celand 

Horace Hardv Mark e" , 

Ida Holloway Mark evil Ie 

i r] ,- Tj j Spiceland 

yI v ^T X Newcastle 
Ifrn l{ e5SUP Clay Center, Neb 
Lima Lawrence Spiceland 



22 

Frank Pitts Carthage 

Maude M. Shaffer [ Payne] New Castle 

Oscar F. Symons Knighlstown 

1895 

Clarence Painter Spiceland 

Mabel Wright New Lisbon 

Edgar Cox Spiceland 

*NeIHe Ratliff 

Howard Henley New Castle 

Maude Wildman Philadelphia, 

Frank Hudelson Mays 

Pearl Moffett Greensboro 

1896 

Cora Hudson Spiceland 

Clara White Kaysville 

Elsie Hudelson Greenfield 

Anna Morris • Lincolnville 

Pearl M. James Shelbyville 

Mabel Newby [Hood] New Castle 

W. J. Carson • Chicago 

Nora Griffin Spiceland 

Theresa Wildman Richmond 

Roscoe Edwards Snyder 

1897 

Leoti Applegate [Coffinl Spiceland 

Elva M. Hudson Spiceland 

Lois 'M. Henley Spiceland 

■ Fanny Hayes Dunreith 

Floy Hudelson Greenfield 

Josie B. Harlan .• Dana 

Jessie Leaky New Lisbon 

Pearl Millikan Spiceland 

Ethel Rifner Spiceland 

Mayine Stafford Spiceland 

Clyde Sisson Spiceland 



*Dccea>ie.d. 



23 

Minnie Stratton [Stafford] .Spiceland 

Charlie White Mt. Summit 

Irving White Lewisville 

1898 

Clifford Applegate Spiceland 

James Holtsclaw Spiceland 

Bavis Nay Springport 

Emory Ratcliff Cadiz 

Gertrude Seaford Spiceland 

Pearl Symons Spiceland 

Lelia Smith Spring-port 

Charles A. Beard Oxford, England 

Merritt Stafford Greensboro 

Cora Smith Springport 

Walter Painter Spiceland 

Bertha Charles Spiceland 

Ernest V. Shockley Straughn 

Elsie L. Shockley Straughn 

Bessie Haisley Spiceland 

Bertha O. Lawrence Spiceland 

Florence O. Macy Lewisville 

Earl Moffett Greensboro 

Walter D. Pearce New Castle 

Orabell Shaffer New Castle. 

1900 

Ethel Applegate Spiceland. 

Edgar Bazzle Springport. 

Susan Benedict Springport. 

Cora Charles ( Carson) Upland 

Connie Griffin Ogden. 

David W. Gordon Raysville. 

Guy R. Hall, New Lisbon. 

Clyde Kennedy Mauzy. 

Clarence Macy Lewisville. 

Everett Macy Lewisville. 

Carroll Mills Straughns. 

Cecil Newby, Spiceland. 

Jeanette Rifner Spiceland. 



VI 



24 

Pernia Thornburg Spiceland. 

John R. Thompson . . . : Sulphur Sprin 



■f- On page lr>, First Year Class, the name Rupert B. Recliu 
should read Rupert B. Redic. 




~~ — * *** — - ■■ 



SPICELAND 
ACADEMY 

AND 

NORMAL 
SCHOOL 



1901-1902 
SPICELAND. IND. . 



Tarnc-XB ptg Co.. 

>E'V C'ASTLS, IXD. 



am 



-t^=-i ic^as — ,- „ _ i . 



Officers and Faculty. 



Board of Trustees. 

Samuel E. Test, President. 
Herbert T. Baily, Secretary 
Oscar H. Bogue, Treasurer. 
Martha E. S. Charles. 
Terrell Wilson. 
Jason W. Newby. 



Instructors 

For the Academic Year, 190J-/9C2. 

M. S. Woods, Superintendent, 
Iadiana State Normal, 1889, -Indiana University, A. B. 1900, 

Afathematic* and Science. 

Homer H. Cooper, 
IndUna University, A. B. 1890. 
History and Science. 

Anna M. Moore, 

Eariham, Ph. B. 18S4. 
English and Latin. 

D. H. Weir, 
Nortcern Indiana Normal School, 1899. 
Psychology and Pedagogy. 



Calendar 



J902 

Fall Term begins Monday, September I. 

Fall Term ends Friday, December 19. 

Winter Term begins Monday, January 5, ick>3>- 

Winter Term ends March 27, 1903. 

Spring Term begins Monday, April 6, 1903. 

Field Day, June 19. 

Commencement, June 26. 



Spiceland Academy. 



History 

gPICELAND ACADEMY is the oldest Academy 
in charge of Friends in Indiana. It was char- 
tered as an Academy in 1870, but its history as a 
Friends' school extends over a period of more than 
sixty years. It is under the control of Spiceland 
Monthly Meeting, by which body the Board of 
Trustees is appointed. The teachers are selected 
by the Trustees. While the school is under 
denominational control, it is not sectarian in the 
least; its foundation Tests upon Christian culture. 
The first class was graduated in 1870, andmore than 
3,000 students have received instruction in the 
school since its organization as an Academy. 
Location 

Spiceland Academy is located in the beautiful 
town of Spiceland, Indiana, in the Southern part 
of Henry county, on the Lake Erie and Western 
Railroad, two miles north of Dunreith, on the 
Pennsylvania Railroad. The buildings are situated 
in the midst of a beautiful grove, adjoining which 
is a large campus, well adapted to athletic sports. 
Er.:racre 

Students may enter at any time, but students 
coming from other schools are required to bring 
certificates slating their literary and moral standing 



5 



In the absence of approved certificate, examinations 
will be held and students classified accordingly. 
Classes in Grammar School branches are maintain- 
ed as demand may justify, affording opportunity for 
preparatory work to students who may not be eli- 
gible to regular academic standing. 

The conditions for admission to the First Year 
class are the same as for entrance to the public high 
schools of this state. 

In general, graduates from the non-commission- 
ed high schools of this county can enter the Acad- 
emy with a credit of six terms' work. Three terms 
are usually required to complete the course. 



I 



6 



1 

M 
« 


i SCIENCE 


Zoology * 


Geology * 


o 

2* 
fa 

if 2 






Ohemiatry * 


Physics 


* 

3 
o 
a 

3 
Li 

GO 


Botany 


s b Briefly Outlined 


MATHEMATICS 


Algebra 


Continued 


Continued 


Plane Geometry 


Oontinued 


Solid Geometry* 




Trigonometry * 




the Entire Count 


HISTORY 


f Civics * 


English 
History * 


* 

3 

a 

a 

o 
O 


1 Greece J 


Rome 


_ * i 

.2 § 

13 T3 

CO O 

» 


Political 
Economy 


CD 

W 

%* 

'3 f£ 
3 s: 


6 
o 

O <n 

3 & 

2 £ 

i S"9 3 3 
S 2^- 


THE COURSE OF STUDY-The Work for 


ENGLISH 


L *■« « 

9 5*5 * 

s J| 

■ocoQ 

|S.s« 

•Sal a 


Contiuued 


1 Continued 


I Composition 
Study of Essays 


Oontinued 


Composition & 
Study of Novels 


Rhetoric 


Study of English 
Olaasics 


Study of Tenny- 
son & Shakspere 
Themes 


1 LATIN 


First Latin 
Book 


Contiuued 


j Oontinued 

1 


!* 

at 

M 

CO 

03 
O 


i uontinued 1 


«a 

3 

a 

a 
a 
O 


Oiceio 


o — < 

CD CC 

5i> 


Virgil 


FIR8T YEAR 


Pall Term 


Winter Term 


Spring Term 


Fall Term 


winter Term 


Spring Term 


1 Miinu T CMK 

Fall Term 


Winter Term 


a 

M 

CD 

to £ 

o -S 

02 * 



7 



Higher classes in any of the work will be formed 
whenever there is sufficient demand, and tuition will 
be charged at the same rate as for a third year study. 
Satisfactory work in these studies may be substituted 
for work in the regular course at the discretion of 
the Superintendent. 

The above course of study has been prepared 
with reference to the needs of those students who 
do not expect to pursue a college course, but desire 
to acquire a knowledge of those branches which will 
fit them for active life. Special attention, 

HOWEVER, IS GIVEN TO PREPARING STUDENTS FOR 

college, and additional work in Latin, Mathematics 
and other subjects will be given when a sufficient 
number of pupils desire it. Graduates are urged to 
take a college course, and they will be admitted to 
any of the leading colleges in Indiana without 
examination. 

The course of study makes provision for a num- 
ber of electives, thus giving the student an oppor- 
tunity to select work along the line of his preference. 
The thirty-six credits required for graduation are 
distributed among the departments as follows: 
Latin, nine; English, nine; History, five; Mathe- 
matics, five; Science, three; Electives, five. 

At the close of the winter term the members of 
the Second Year class hold an exhibition, for which 
each member prepares an essay or oration, and the 
public speakers are chosen from the number. 

Public exercises in declamation will be given by 
the First Year class at the end of the fall term. 
Englua 

Besides the usuul work in English Grammar, 
special attention is paid to English Composition, 



8 



which is preparatory to work in Rhetoric. This 
consists of a study of grammatical purity, choice 
and use of words, and kinds of composition with 
practical exercises. English and American Litera- 
ture receive careful attention. And the effort is 
made to rouse a real interest in the literature for 
its own sake and to increase the culture of the 
student by developing a love for the best in thought 
and style. 

Latin 

In order to receive a diploma a student must 
have done three years' work in Latin, or, in special 
cases, equivalents may be taken to fit the student for 
college. Thorough drill on the declension of nouns, 
adjectives and the conjugation of verbs is given, also 
on the application of the rules of construction and 
the acquiring of a vocabulary. The derivation of 
Enfilish words is studied, and in the advanced work 
exercises in sight reading and Latin composition are 
given. It is the purpose to invest all the work in 
Latin with a living spirit that it may be a means of 
genuine literary culture as well as mental discipline. 

The "First Latin Book," by Collar & Daniel, is 
used as a text in the First Year class. Any of the 
standard editions of the Latin classics may be used 
in the subsequent work. 

History 

A thorough foundation is laid in General His- 
tory, English History, Civil Government and 
Political Economy. It is the purpose of this course 
to reveal the various steps by which the great iristi- 



9 



tutions have developed and grown from early times 
until the present. 

Science 

The Academy is supplied with sufficient appara- 
tus to be a valuable aid in the study of the natural 
sciences. In Physics the subject is illustrated by 
many simple pieces of apparatus, besides the air 
pump, electrical machine, batteries, etc. In Chem- 
istry students do practical work in the laboratory, 
which is supplied with necessary chemicals and 
apparatus. Geology and Mineralogy are illustrated 
by a collection of more than twelve hundred speci- 
mens, presented to the Academy by the Alumni. 
In Zoology and Botony, animals and plants are 
studied from nature, and systems of classifications 
are made prominent. In all the sciences objects 
are used as much as possible. 

Mathematics. 

The aim in this study is to introduce the stu- 
dent to mathematical methods and to develop in 
him the power to reason clearly and accurately on 
any given problem. Algebra is studied throughout 
the first year of the High School, Geometry during 
the second year. A great deal of supplementary 
work is given in Algebra and original exercises are 
introduced as much as possible in Geometry. As- 
tronomy is studied during the winter term of the 
third year. In this subject the work is largely de- 
scriptive. A good six-inch telescope belongs to the 
Academy. 



10 

Literary Exzrrises. 

Literary exercises are required of students in 
all grades, both in class work and before the public. 
Care is used that students may learn the art of com- 
position and public delivery. Essays and declama- 
tions are a part of the regular school work. 

Oratory and Elocution 

There is an Oratorical Association which is as- 
sociated with similar organization of students of 
Fairmount, Central and Westfield Academies in the 
Inter-Academic Oratorical Association of Indiana. 
In each school a contest is held in oratory and dec- 
lamation. The successful contestant in each de- 
partment represents his school in an Inter-Academ- 
ic contest held in April. 

Libraries. 

Four sets of Encyclopedias are in the school- 
rooms, and these, with the dictionaries and numer- 
ous reference books, are for the free use of all. 
There are three libraries in connection with the 
school, which comprise about three thousand vol- 
umes, two of them belonging to the Literary Socie- 
ty, and the other to the Academy Association. Ad- 
ditions are made each year. 



Normal Department 



For several years past special arrangements 
have been made to give those students desiring to 
teach; the opportunity of normal instruction during 



1 1 



the spring term. A special normal instructor has 
been employed and many students of this and ad- 
joining counties have availed themselves of this op- 
portunity. , 
The increasing demand for normal work and 
for a more extended course than can be given dur- 
ing the spring term, has induced the board to add a 
normal department that provides for a full year s 
work of three terms as follows: 



FaU Term.. 


1st Grammar 


1 

1st ArithmeticjlstUS.History 


Physiology 


W later!" rm 


2d Grammar 


1 

2d Arithmetic j2dU.S. History 


1st Geography 


*3prtagTrm 


Mothod 


Reading 


Psychology 


2d Geography 



*AU the common branches are offered in this term. 



In the fall term classes will be organized with 
the view of continuing the work throughout the 
year During the winter term those having started 
ih the fall will advance to the next work in the 

course. , 

In the spring term classes will be provided for 
those beginning the normal work, and for those who 
have done one term's work. It is thus seen that all 
the legal branches, Psychology and Method may be 
had in the spring term. 

It is not the purpose of high schools to give 
students a teacher's knowledge of the legal branches. 
However it is known that many high school gradu- 
ates desire to teach. This course of normal work 
is especially fitted for this class of students, and for 
students having graduated from common schools, 
who wish to get a more comprehensive knowledge 
of the legal branches, and learn correct methods of 



+2 

teaching them. Psychology, Pedagogy and Method 
will be given to make work characteristically pro- 
fessional. 

In the normal course it is not intended to con- 
duct a scheme of cramming for examination, but it 
is our intention to help teachers in their schools 
quite as much as to aid them to get licenses. 

Work will be so arranged that students who 
desire to take part academic work and part normal 
work will be accommodated. 

General Items 

The government of the school is based upon 
the idea that manhood is more than scholarship- 
that self-respect and self-control on the part of the 
student are important factors in the formation of 
character. Greater stress is laid upon the thorough- 
ness of instruction and accuracy of knowledge than 
upon rapidity of advancement. 

A daily class record of the work of each pupil 
is kept. This record and the final examination de- 
termine the recorded grade. 

For many years the health of students has been 
uniformly Sood. There is probably no better loca- 
tion in the state in this respect. 

The Friends and Methodists both hold religious 
sen-ices on the Sabbath and each maintains a Sab- 
bath-school. Meetings of the Young People's So- 
ciety of Christian Endeavor and the Epworth 
League are held every Sabbath evening, and stu- 
dents are welcomed to their meetings and member- 
ship. 

A sufficient number cf teachers is constantly 
employed, so that large classes may be avoided, and 



13 



students may receive personal attention during the 
recitation. 

Expenses are as low as at any other school 
affording equal advantages. 

The managers of the school are very careful to 
make this an institution in which students who are 
away from home and its restraints, will be surround- 
ed by good, moral influences, and in this they have 
the co-operation of the citizens of the village. 

There are no beer, liquor or billiard saloons in 
the village. 

No student whose influence is known to have a 
corrupting tendency will be retained in the school. 

Diploma 

Students whose conduct is exemplary, and who 
complete the course of study and prepare and de- 
liver a suitable literary production, will be furnished 
a diploma, signed by the instructors, and the Presi- 
dent and Secretary of the Board of Trustees. 



i-eciurss 



Students have the opportunity to hear good 
lectures at small expense. Addresses on various 
subjects are given during the year by able speakers. 

Tezts Used During the Year 

First Latin Collar and Driniel 

Classics V arious Texts 

English Selections 

Rhetoric : Genung's 

English Literature Painter 

Algebra Wells 

Geometry Wentworth 

Physical Geography Hinman 



14 



Physics Gage 

Chemistry Cooley 

Astronomy Steel-Todd 

Botany Coulter's Plant Studies 

Psychology Halleck 

English History Montgomery 

General History Myers 

Civics Fiske 

Political Economy Walker 

U. S. History Channing 

Grammar Wisely 

Physiology Macy and Norris 



Expenses 



Rate* of Tuition. 

Grammar School, . four studies, 75 cts per week 
First Year Academic,for each study, 20 " " 
Second Year Academic, " " 22^2 " " 
Third Year Academic, " 25 " " 

Normal Classes, " " 25 

Students who enter at irregular times will be 
charged full tuition for the term in case they com- 
plete the term's work in such manner as to receive 
credit toward the diploma. 

Normal students and others who may not ex- 
pect to earn credit in the regular course will be 
charged only for the time of actoal enrollment in 
classes. 

Occasionally those who are especially strong 
are permitted to earn credits by outside study un- 



15 

der the supervision of the ^teachers. For such 
credits as these one-half the regular tuition will be 
charged. 

Tuition is due at the opening of each term and 
settlement should be made with the Supdrintendent 
or the Treasurer of the Board of Trustees. Stu- 
dents will receive no credit for their work until 
the tuition is paid. 

Boarding. 

The citizens of Spiceland have always given 
the students a hearty welcome by receiving them 
into their homes- The cost of boarding and rooms 
in private families where everything is furnished can 
be had for $2.50 to $3.00 a week. Rooms both fur- 
nished and unfurnished can be had for from 25 to 
50 cents a week, and table borrd of excellent quality 
at the rate of $1.50 to $2.00 for the full week. 

Thus persons who may live near enough to go 
home at the end of each week and who wish to 
economise may reduce the cost of living to a very 
small sum. 



16 



LIST OF STUDENTS. 



SENIORS 



Anderson, Harley 
Baily, Jessie 
Beeson, Josephine 
Black, Allie 
Butler, Mary 
Byers, Walter 
Kirk, Jennie 
Linda-mood, Harry 



Maple, Q-urney 
Newby, Paul 
Seaford, Herbert 
Seaford, Howard 
Smith, Manning 
Thomas, Rena 
Thomas, Retta 
Wilson, Russell 
Yost, India- 17 



JUNIORS 



Bartlett, Rilla 
Beckett, Nellie 
Bell, Elsie 
Holt, Perrin 
Hoover, Claire 
Jones, Barton 



Johnson, Arthur 
Newby, Carl 
Painter, Anna 
Redic, Rupert 
Rifner, Etta 
Stubbs, Ralph 



Wright, Walter- 13 



FRESHMEN 



Brandy, Walter 
Denner, Grace 
Edwards, Warren 
Evans, Irl 
Gardner, Ruth 
Griffin, ©ran 
Harvey, Ruth 
Harvey. Ethel 
Heacock, Hazel 
Henley, Homer 
Jordan. Belva 
Lane. Aurie 
Maple, Florence 



Midkiff, John 
Patterson, Sadie 
Patterson, Clara 
Pitts, Lois 
Pitts, Wendell 
Ratlin" , Morris 
Richey, Vaughn 
Sinalley, Gertrude 
Spencer, William 
Test, Everett 
Wright, Horace 
Wright, Ethel 
Yockey, Harold-26 



IRREGULAR 

Beard. Elsie Millikan, Jennie 

Bower, Chester Painter, Floyd 

Burt. William Pearson, Wiiber 



17 



Coffin, Ernest 
Griffin, Horace 
Haisley, Fred 
Hoover, Clifford 
McGrady, John 



Poarch, Fahy 
Risk, Blanche 
Rittenour, Jesse 
Shockley, Frank 
Taylor, Jesse- 16 



NORMAL 



Anderson, Pearl 
Bell, Ira 
Bennett, Rollin 
Butler, Bertha 
Charles, Bertha 
Compton, Jennie 
Conwell, James 
Delon, ELsie 
Harvey, Laura 
Henley, Lora 
Hinshaw, Rufus 



Hinshaw, May 
Macy, Carlos 
Miller, Cora 
Millikan, < Georgia 
Moffett, Mary 
Pearson, Bertha 
Peckinpaugh, Felix 
Stewart, Grace 
Thomas, Amy 
Wilkinson, Tweeda 
Woody, India-22 



ALUMNI. 



I870 

*Eli U Cook 

John J Stubbs Omaha, Neb 

1871 

Walter D Jones Dayton, Ohio 

*Alvin H Jenkins 

*I Macy Good 

C R Dixon Lawrence, Kan- 

R G Boone Cincinnati, Ohio 

Dallas Sisson Spiceland 

Mary Ballenger (Barnard) New Castle 

Louisa Wickersham Lewisville 

Lida Edwards (Saint) New Castle.- 



'Deceased 



18 



1872 

Lindley H Johnson Dunreith 

David Henley Spiceland 

"Jacob Hill 

Henry \V Painter Spiceland 

Robert G Mitchell Pacific Grove, Cal 

1873 

*Sadie D Talbert (Wright) 

Aaron B Bell Springport, Kan 

*J Tilman Hutchins 

John Pennington Providence, R I 

Mary Stubbs (Painter) Spiceland 

Nathan Williams Oswega, Kan 

Carrie Talbert (Newbv) Wichita, Kan 

1874 

Alice Coffin (Russell) St. Louis, Mo 

Elvira Spencer (Harrold) Indianapolis 

J P Edwards Anderson 

William S Moffit Kennard 

Edwin O Kennard Pasadena, Cal 

Nathan Rosenberger Muscatine, Iowa 

W E Jackson , Knightstown 

D C Mitchell Spiceland 

1875 

WW Gregg Chicago, 111 

Wm Pidgeon Bloomington 

Irvin Stanley Westfield 

1877 

Milton Roberts Lynnville, Iowa 

1S78 

S Ella Bogue (Dogget) Danville, Va 

Belle Chamters (Estes) New Castle 



♦Deceased. 



19 



J Pinkney Mitchell Fresno, Cal 

Thomas Mitchell Knightstown 

Flora Moore (Brady) Hartford City 

John O Reed E. Saginaw, Mich 

William S Seaford Spiceland 

Fannie Thornburg (Parsons) . . . .Oak Park, 111 

1879 

J A Buck Muncie 

Carrie Goodwin (Jeffrey) New Castle 

Thomas Newlin Guilford, N C 



1880 

J Edgar Cloud 

Wm N Lamb 

Mattie Lamb Outland 

Ada Grace Murphey 

Ida May Roberts 

Emma Belle Roberts. 

Frank Symons . . . . 

Lamira Trueblood (Kellum) 

1881 



Oscar R Baker Winchester 

*Corrie Bogue 

Minnie Benedict (Blankenship) . .Paragon 

Carrie Unthank (Kellum) Indianapolis 

*Jes9e Strattan 

1882 

'Arthur H. Baily 

J Newton Barnard Middletown 

Harriet Bogue (Newlin) Irvington 

Hattie E Dickinson Spiceland 

Charles Newlin Irvington 



Chicago, 111 

San Francisco 

Amboy 

New Castle 

Irvington 

Sun River, Mont 

Portland, Me 

Friendswood 



1883. 

Anna Hudelson (Fo9ter) . . . 
•Dooeased. 



Wash'ton, D C 



20 



Ryland Ratliff Fairmount 

Julia Stafford (Newby) Cadiz 

Emily Weeks Mechanicsburg 

1884. 

*Cora Kirk 

Ella Strattan (Hodson) Spiceland 

Virginia Griffin (Cory) Dunreith 

Isadore Hall (Wilson) Spiceland 

William Julian Juniata, Neb 

Charles Newby Chicago, 111 

1885- 

Mary L Brown (Pennington) . . . .Spiceland 

Alfred Y King Mt Vernon, 111 

OliTer C Steele Spiceland 

. .VT ' 1886. 

L Winnie Baily (Clement) .... . Haddonfield, N J 

Mattie E. Brown Daytona, Fla 

Richard Broadbent Elwood 

Elbert Griffin Elwood 

Alonzo C Hodson ... 4 New Castle 

*John L McNew 

Russell Ratliff Marion 

1887 

Herbert T Baily Spiceland 

Clarence H Beard New Castle 

Anna K Bogue (Shaffer) B Harbor, Mich 

Lindley Compton Tomah, Wis 

Lizzie S Hiatt Omaha, Neb 

Abram Miller Kennard 

Bert Smith Zionville 

i83S 

Rhoda Ballenger (Cunningham) . .Indianapolis 
Hannah Brown (Stribbing) Dexter, Iowa 

♦Deceased. 



21 



Oryntha Brown (Jester) Payton, Iowa 

*Tessie Butler _ T 

Clara G Edwards (Knight) St Louis, Mo 

John C Cook • Greensboro 

Elva Elliott (Compton) Tomah, Wis 

Achsah E Ratcliff New Castle 

HH RatcliS Spiceland 

HHRayl.... Muncie 

Charles Stubbs....: Swayzee 

J A Greenstreet New Castle 

1889 

Laura Benedict § prinS c p ?? 

Blanch Braddock (McNew) Greenfield 

Frank Copeland Dunreith 

Estella Deem Spice and 

Lawrence Gardner Spiceland 

Gertrude Gordon (Genaux) Wilkinson 

Sue Griffin (Evans) Spiceland 

Otis Stubbs Lewisville 

Mary White Pasadena, Cal 

1890 

LEtta Butler Lewisville 

Elmer Deem ? p iceland 

Edwin B Ratcliff N T ew S as ! e 

Bennie Strattan New Castle 

S E Stubbs Wilkinson 

1891 

Ethel M Copeland Chicago, 111 

Louie Edmundson (Poe) Knightstown 

Maurine Gardner (Kern) Cadiz 

Charles N Hardy Markleville 

O Alice Hiatt (Barrett) Knightstown 

Ernest Sisson... ?* a * 

Alfred H Symons Wilkinson 

Mary M Teas Irvmgton 



♦Deceased. 



22 



Charles Titus Warrington 

Herbert D Woodard .Fountain City 

1892 

Jesse S Baily Denver, Col 

Clara Brown Spiceland 

Warren T Evans Minn'polis, Minn 

John B Greenstreet Lewisville 

Winnie Hinshaw (Milligan* Winchester 

David M Kemp Kempton 

Alice Lawrence Cleveland, O 

Estella Symons Minn'polis, Minn 

Alvin Ulrich Greensboro 

1893 

Oscar Bogue Spiceland 

Estella Charles Spiceland 

Floy Hill Pasadena, Cal 

Arthur Holloway Oskaloosa, la 

Leora Jessup Westland 

John Miller., Spiceland 

Olen Payne New Castle 

Lena Rayl Spiceland 

George Smith Greensboro 

Orville White Galena, 111 

1894 

Minnie Black (Moore) Chicago, 111 

Bessie I Brown Spiceland 

Clarence V Hall New Castle 

Horace Hardy Markleville 

Ida Holloway Spiceland 

Arlie Hood New Castle 

Bertha Jessup Clay Center, Neb 

Elma Lawrence Spiceland 

Maud M Shaffer (Payne) New Castle 

Frank Pitts Carthage 

Oscar F Symons Minn'plis, Minn 

1895 

Clarence Painter Spiceland 



23 



Mable Wright New Lisbon 

Edgar Cox Kansas City, Mo 

*Nellie Ratliff 

Howard Henley New Castle 

Maude Wildman Philadelphia, Pa 

Frank Hudelson Mays 

Pearl Moffett Greensboro 

1896 

Cora Hudson Spiceland 

Clara White Raysville 

Elsie Hudelson Greenfield 

Anna Morris Lincolnville 

Pearl M James Shelbyville 

Mable Newby (Hood) New Castle 

W J Carson Chicago 

Nora Griffin Spiceland 

Theresa Wildman Philadelphia, Pa 

Roscoe Edwards Snyder 

1897 

Leoti Applegate (Coffin) Spiceland 

Elva M Hudson Spiceland 

Lois M Henley Spiceland - 

Fanny HaTes Dunreith 

Floy Hudelson . , Greenfield 

Josie B Harlan Dana 

Jessie Leaky New Lisbon 

Pearl Millikan Spiceland 

Ethel Rifner Spiceland 

Mayme Stafford Spiceland 

Clyde Sisson Spiceland 

Minnie Stratton (Stafford) Greensboro 

Charlie White Mt Summit 

Irving White Lewisville 

1898 

Clifford Applegate Spiceland 

James Holtsclaw -Spiceland 

Bavis Nay Springport 



* 



34 



Emory Ratcliff Cadiz 

Gertrude Seaford Spiceland 

Pearl Symons Spiceland 

Lelia Smith Springgort 

Charles A Beard.. Chicago, 111 

Merritt Stafford • • • • Greensboro 

Cora Smith Springport 

Walter Painter Spiceland 

Bertha Charles. Spiceland 

Ernest Shockley .Straughn 

Elsie Shockley .Straughn 

1899 

Bessie Haisley Spiceland 

Bertha O Lawrence Spiceland 

Florence O Macy Lewisville 

Earl Moffett Greensboro 

Walter D Pearce • • • . New Castle 

Orabell Shaffer New Castle 

1900 

Ethel Appelgate Spiceland 

Edgar Bazzle _ Springport 

Susan Benedict Springport 

Cora Charles (Carson) Logansport 

Connie Griffin Ogden 

David W Gordon Raysville 

Guy R Hall New Lisbon 

Clyde Kennedy Mauzy 

Clarence Macy Lewisville 

Everett Macy Lewisville 

Carroll Mills Straughns 

Cecil Newby Spiceland 

Jeannette Rifner Spiceland 

Pernia Thornburg Spiceland 

Joon R Thompson Sulphur Springs 

1901 

Ira E Bell Spiceland 

Bertha E Butler Spiceland 



25 



Raymond Byrket Ogden 

Jennie Compton Spiceland 

Everett Cope Lewisville 

Deborah Edwards Snyder 

Ethel Edwards Snyder 

Lillian O Hayes Dunreith 

Walter B Harvey Dunreith 

John R Hinshaw Greensboro 

Everett Macy Lewisville 

Georgia Milhkan Spiceland 

Jennie E Millikan Spiceland 

Homer E Nugen Lewisville 

Cora E Risk Spiceland 

Robert A Roberts Bloomington 

Manning J Smith Springport 

Grace E Stewart New Castle 

Russell L \V right Greensboro 

Walter C Wilson Spiceland 




SPICELAND 
ACADEMY 

AND 



NORMAL 
SCHOOL ^ 




1902-1903 



SPICELAND, INDIANA 



BOARD OF TRUSTEES. 

Samuel E. Test, Pnemdant, 
. Herbert T. B.ulv, Secretary': 
OSCAR H. BoGUE, Treasurer. 
Samuel B. Lane. 
Charles Harvey. 
Jason Wi Newby. 

INSTRUCTORS. 

For the Academic Year 1902-1903. 

M. S. Woods, A. B., Superintendent. 
Mathematics and Normal. 

Homer H. Cooper, A. M. 
History and Science. 



Maude Taylor, A. B. 
English and Latin. 



FACULTY AND CALENDAR. 
& 

For the Academic Year J903-I904. 
INSTRUCTORS. 

Homer H. Cooper, A. M., Superintendent. 
History and Science. 

Mathematics and Normal . 
Maude Taylor, A. B. 

Latin and English. 
Martha E. S. Charles, 
Bookkeeping, Shorthand, Typewriting and Journalism. 

Emilte Knowltox, 
Vocal and Instrumental Music. 

Nellie G. Hodson, 
Elocution, Oratory, and Physical Culture. 

CALENDAR. 
J903. 

Fall Term begins Monday, September 7. 
Fall Term ends Thursday, December 24. 

J904. 

"Winter Term begins Monday, January 4. 
"Winter Term ends Friday, March 25. 
Spring Term begins Monday, April 4. 
Commencement, Friday, June 24. 



— 6 - 



SPICELAND ACADEMY. 

HISTORY. 

Spiceland Academy is the oldest academy in charge 
of the Friends in Indiana. It was chartered as an acad- 
emy in 1870, but its history as a Friends' school extends 
over a period of about seventy years. It is under the con- 
trol of the Spiceland Monthly Meeting, by which body the 
Board of Trustees is appointed. The teachers are selected 
by the Trustees. While the school is under denomina- 
tional control, it is not sectarian in the least; its founda- 
tion rests upon Christian culture ; it has been kept under 
strong Christian influences, and its purpose is to develop 
practical, earnest, and active Christian manhood and 
womanhood. 

The first cl ass was graduated in 1870. The Alumni 
Association now enrolls about two hundred and sixty mem- 
bers. About three thousand live hundred students have 
received instruction in the school since its organization as 
an academv. 

LOCATION. 

Spiceland Academy is located in the beautiful town of 
Spiceland, Indiana, in the southern part of Henry county, 
on the Lake Erie and Western railroad, two miles north of 
Dunreith, on the Pennsylvania railroad. The buildings 
are situated in the midst of a beautiful grove, adjoining 
which is a large campus, well adapted to athletic sports. 

The interurban street-car line will soon be completed, 
ami will give connections with surrounding cities. 



ENTRANCE. 

Students may enter at any time, but students coming 
from other schools are required to briilg certificates stat- 
ing their literary and moral standing. In the absence of 
approved certificate, examinations will be held and stu- 
dents classified accordingly. Classes in Grammar School 
branches are maintained as demand may justify, affording 
opportunity for preparatory work to students who may not 
be eligible to regular academic standing- 

The conditions for admission to the First Year class 
are the same as for entrance to the public high schools of 
this State. 

In general, graduates from the non-commissioned high 
schools of this county can enter the Academy with a credit 
of six terms' work. Three terms are usually required to 
complete the course. 

COURSE OF STUDY. 
The Academy course of study has been arranged with 
two purposes in view : 

First It is prepared to conform to the needs and de- 
sires of all students who may not have the opportunity to 
pursue a college course, but who desire a practical educa- 
tion which will prepare them to lead an active and a suc- 
cessful life. 

Second— It is arranged to enable students to make the 
necessary preparation for admission in college without 
examination. 

Advanced classes in any of the lines of study will lie 
formed whenever a sufficient number of pupils desire the 
higher work. The diploma of the Academy will admit 

— 8 — 




— 9 — 



the student to any of the colleges of Indiana or of other 
States without entrance examinations. 

Higher classes in any subject or classes in subjects not 
offered will be formed whenever there is sufficient de- 
mand,, and tuition will be charged at the same rate as for 
a third' year study. Satisfactory work in these studies 
may be substituted for work in regular course at the dis- 
cretion of the Superintendent. 

The course of study makes provision for a number of 
electives, thus giving the student an opportunity to select 
work along the line of his preference. The thirty-six 
credits required for graduation are distributed among the 
departments as follows: Latin, nine; English, nine; 
History, five; Mathematics, five; Science, three; Elec- 
tives, five. 

It is especially urged, that all pupils take the regular 
Latin course of study, and after graduation attend college 
if possible. 

Increased advantages are offered in the arrangements' 
made to take elective work in the following departments: 
Normal, Commercial, Music, and Elocution and Oratory. 

ENGLISH. 

The course in English is made thorough and practical. 
All the college entrance requirements are studied. Spe- 
cial attention is given to Grammar and Composition lead- 
ing to Khetoric. English and American Literature receive 
careful attention. The effort is made to rouse a real in- 
terest in the literature for its own sake and to increase 
the culture of the student by developing a love for the 
best in thought and style. 

— IO — 



HISTORY. 

Besides the culture value of history, it is to be remem- 
bered that it is the study which furnishes the student the 
ideals of character which lead to the highest moral growth 
The student should thoroughly understand the institutional 
life of the people studied. 

The purposes of history in the Academy are as follows : 
First— The development of moral character. History 
as the study of institutional life and of character teaches 
us to watch the progress of humanity in the rise and fall 
of nations. Success or failure in national life or in the 
life of a person will cause us to adopt for ourselves and 
our country that which has proven of excellent worth. 
History helps us to avoid the mistakes of other people and 
nations. 

Second— The teaching of patriotism and the broaden- 
ing of our interests and sympathies. While we wish to be 
familiar with our own government and national character 
we must recognize the broad principle of the universal 
brotherhood of men. 

Third— The development of our powers. of judgment. 
It is here that we especially study the relation retween 
cause and effect. Every statesman has been a student of 
history. In studying the problems of life which have con- 
fronted other people we are greatly aided in the practical 
solution of the life problems of to-day. 

Fourth— The acquirement of useful facts. This, 
though generally considered of the most importance, is in 
fact but a subordinate purpose in the study of history. 

Fifth— The gaining of a broad and practical general 



I 



culture. The work consists of the study of Civil Govern- 
ment and English History in the tirst year: a special study 
of Greece, Rome, and Medieval and Modern History in 
the second year: the study of Political Economy, Business 
Law, and I". S. History in the third year. 

MATHEMATICS. 
The 'aim in this study is to introduce the student to 
mathematical methods and to develop in him the power to 
reason (dearly and accurately on any given problem. ' Al- 
gebra is studied throughout the tirst year of the High 
School, Geometry during the second year. A great deal 
of supplementary work is given in Algebra, and original 
exercises are introduced as much as possible in Geometry. 
Astronomy is studied during the winter term of the third 
year. In this subject the work is largely descriptive. A 
good six-inch telescope belongs to the Academy. 

LATIN. 

There is no subject in the Academy w hich has greater 
disciplinary value to the pupil than the study of Latin. 
It trains and strengthens the memory, cultivates and 
quickens the perception, and deyelopes habits of ready, 
accurate, and sound thinking. 

A very large per cent, of all the words used in the 
dictionary will lie of Latin origin, therefore some knowl- 
edge of this subject is absolutely necessary for a correct 
understanding of our own English language. It gives us 
a key to a quicker understanding of all that we read or 
hear. It is essential to all who are to continue the work 
in college. It is helpful to every professional man. It 

— 12 — 



will give us a greater appreciation of the Latin writers 
and speakers. It increases our general culture and con- 
tributes to our broader discipline. 

The course in Latin, or its equivalent, German, is re- 
quired of all who receive a diploma. In special ea-es. to 
tit the student for college, equivalent subjects may he sub- 
stituted. 

GERMAN. 

The German Language is now offered as a substitute 
for the Latin course to students who prefer it. Students 
are advised to take the Latin, however. 

SCIENCE. 

The xVcademy is supplied with sufficient apparatus to 
be a valuable aid in the study of the natural sciences. 
In Physics the subject is illustrated by many simple 
pieces of apparatus, besides the air pump, electrical ma- 
chine, batteries, etc. In Chemistry, students do practical 
work in the laboratory, which is supplied with necessary 
chemicals and apparatus. Geology and Mineralogy are 
illustrated by a collection of more than twelve hundred 
specimens, presented to the Academy by the Alumni. In 
Zoology and Botany, animals and plants are studied from 
nature, and systems of classifications are made prominent. 
In all the sciences objects are used as much as possible. 
The following are the purposes in Science work: 
First — To interest the pupil in the observation of na- 
ture. 

Second — To develop the power of reasoning through 
the original investigation of the truths of nature- 
Third — To give a practical knowledge of the elemen- 



1 



tary principles of those sciences which are now, in a great 
measure, causing our rapid progress in the civilization of 
the world. 

<# 

NORMAL DEPARTMENT. 

For several years past special arrangements have been 
made to give those students desiring to teach, the oppor- 
tunity of normal instruction during the spring term. A 
special normal instructor has been employed, and many 
students of this and adjoining counties have availed 
themselves of this opportunity. 

The increasing demand for normal work and for a 

more extended course than can be given during the spring 
term, has induced the board to add a normal department 
that provides for a full year's work of three terms, as fol- 
lows : 



Fall Term. 


ist Grammar. 


ist Arithmetic. 


ist U. S. History. 


Physiology. 


Winter Term. 


2j Grammar. 


20" Arithmetic 


2d U. S. History. 


ist Geography. 


"Spiring; Term. 


Method 


Reading. 


Psychology. 


2d Geography. 



*A1I the common hranches are offered in this term. 



In the fall term, classes will be organized with the 
view of continuing the work throughout the year. Dur- 
ing the winter term those having started in the fall will 
advance to the next work in the course. 

In the spring term, classes will he provided for those 
beginning the normal work, and for those who have done 

— 14 — 



one term's work. It is thus seen that all the legal 
branches, Psychology and Method, may be had in the 
spring term. 

It is not the purpose of high schools to give students 
a teacher's knowledge of the legal branches. However, it 
is known that many high-school graduates desire to teach. 
This course of normal work is especially fitted for this 
class of students, and for students having graduated from 
common schools who wish to get a more comprehensive 
knowledge of the legal branches, and learn correct meth- 
ods of teaching them. Psychology, Pedagogy and Method 
will be given to make work characteristically professional. 

In the normal course it is not intended to conduct a 
scheme of cramming for examination, but it is our inten- 
tion to help teachers in their schools quite as much as to 
aid them to get licenses. 

Work will be so arranged that students who desire to 
take part academic work and part normal work will be 
accommodated. 

COMMERCIAL COURSE. 

A thorough Business Course is now offered and will lie 
taught by a practical and experienced teacher. Book- 
keeping, Typewriting, Shorthand, and Business Law are 
taught. 

It is desired that this course be thorough and com- 
plete. The student will gain a practical knowledge of his 
subject that will enable him to hold responsible positions 
in business life. The expenses are lower than in city busi- 
ness colleges. The student has the advantage of taking 



any desired subject in the academic department. The 
student's surroundings are of the best. 

A special course in Journalism will be given by one' 
who holds a diploma from a college of journalism. 

■ 

COURSE IN MUSIC. 

Vocal and instrumental music will be taught by a 
student of the New England Conservatory of Music and a 
graduate of the National Summer School of Music. In- 
struction will be given in Voice Culture, Oratorio and 
Ballad Singing. 

In the beginning course students who have known 
nothing of music will be taught to read readily and sing 
ordinary church music. Advanced work will be given to 
prepare students to form and conduct chorus classes and. 
to teach music in the public schools. 

Excellent opportunity will be offered to all students 
who wish to take special courses in instrumental music. 

COURSE IN ELOCUTION AND ORATORY. 

First Term's Work — Vocal training and vocal expres- 
sion. Correct mental action in reading and speaking. 
Development of the oratorio and dramatic instincts. 
Study of American poets and orators. Organic gymnas- 
tics. Laws of gesture and pantomime. 

Second Ternrs Work — Training in advanced voice and 
pantomime. Literature. Study of short plays. Mono- 
logues and impersonation. Harmonic physical training. 

Third Ternrs Work — Phonology, Harmony and Cnity. 
— 16 — 



Literature. Conversation and discussion. Dramatic train- 
ing. Shakespeare. 

The expenses will be very low. Free private drills 
will be given. A thoroughly trained teacher is in charge 
of this work. 

GENERAL ITEMS. 

The government of the school is based upon the idea 
that manhood is more than scholarship; that self-respect 
and self-control on the part of -the student are important 
factors in the formation of character. Greater stress is 
laid upon the thoroughness of instruction and accuracy of 
knowledge than upon rapidity of advancement. 

For many years the health of students has been uni- 
formly good. There is probably no better location in the 
State in this respect. 

The Friends and Methodists both hold religious ser- 
vices on the Sabbath and each maintains a Sabbath school. 
Meetings of the Young People's Society of Christian En- 
deavor and the Epworth League are held every Sabbath 
evening, and students are welcomed to their meetings and 
membership. 

A sufficient number of teachers is constantly employed 
so that large classes may be avoided, and students may re- 
ceive personal attention during the recitation. 

Expenses are as low as at any other school affording 
equal advantages. 

The managers of the school are very careful to make 
this an institution in which students who are away from 
home and its restraints will be surrounded by good, moral 

— 17 — 



i 



influences, and in this they have the co-operation of the 
citizens of the village. 

There are no beer, liquor or billiard saloons in the 

city- 
No student whose influence is known to have a cor- 
rupting tendency will be retained in the school. 

DIPLOMAS. 

Students whose conduct is exemplary, and who com- 
plete the course of study and prepare and deliver a suita- 
ble literary production, will be furnished a diploma, 

signed by the instructors and the President and Secretary 
of the Board of Trustees. 

LECTURES. 

Students have the opportunity to hear good lectures 
at small expense. Addresses on various subjects are given 
during the year by able speakers. 

Public exercises in declamation will be given by the 
First Year class at the end of the fall term. 

LITERARY EXERCISES. 

Literary exercises are required of students in all 
grades, both in class work and before the public, (.'are is 
used that students may learn the art of composition and 
public delivery. Essays and declamations are a part of 
the regular school work. 

ORATORY AND ELOCUTION. 

There is an Oratorical Association which is associated 
with similar organization of students of Fairmounf, Cen- 
tral and Westfield Academies in the Inter-Academic Ora- 

— 18 - 



torical Association of Indiana. In each school a contest 
is held in oratory and declamation. The successful con- 
testant in each department represents his school in an In- 
ter-Academic contest held in April. 

LIBRARIES. 

Four sets of encyclopedias are in the school rooms, 
and these, with the dictionaries and numerous reference 
books, are for the free use of all. There are three libra- 
ries in connection with the school, which comprise about 
three thousand volumes, two of them belonging to the 
Literary Society, and the other to the Academy Associa- 
tion. Additions are made each year. 

TEXTS USED DURING THE YEAR. 

First Latin ; Collier and Daniel 

Classics Various Texts 

English Z.. ; Selections 

Rhetoric ' Kavana 

English Literature Painter 

Algebra Wells 

Geometry Wentworth 

Physical Geography Davis 

Physics :- Ga ? e 

Chemistry.. Cooley 

Astronomy _ Steel-Todd 

Botany Coulter's Plant Studies 

Psychology : - - Halleck 

English History Montgomery 

General History '. - M - vers 

Civics Fi ^ ke 

— 19 - 



> 



Political Economy Walker 

U.S. History Charming 

Gi'ammar "Wisely 

Phvsioloirv .; .. .Macy and Norris 



EXPENSES. 

RATES OF TUITION. 

Grammar School, four studies To cents per week 

First Year Academic, for each study ... 20 " " 

Second Year Academic, " ¥ 22k " •* 

Third Year Academic, " " 25 » " 

Normal Classes, " 25 " " 

Students who enter at irregular times will be charged 
full tuition for the term in case they complete the term's 
work in such manner as to receive credit toward the 
diploma. 

Normal students and others who may not expect to 
earn credit in the regular course will be charged only for 
the time of actual enrollment in classes. 

Occasionally those who are especially strong are per- 
mitted to earn credits by outside study under the super- 
vision of the teachers. For such credits as these one-half 
the regular tuition will he charged. 

Tuition is due at the opening of each term, and settle- 
ment should be made with the Superintendent or the 
Treasurer of the Board of Trustees. Students will re- 
ceive no credit for their work until the tuition is paid. 

— 20 — 



1879084 



BOARDING. 

The citizens of Spiceland have always given the stu- 
dents a hearty welcome by receiving them into their 
homes. The cost of boarding and rooms in private fami- 
lies where everything is furnished can be had for *2.00 to 
$3.00 a week. Rooms, both furnished and unfurnished, 
can be had from 25 to 50 cents a week, and table board of 
excellent quality at the rate of $1.50 to $2.00 for the full 
week. 

Thus persons who may live near enough to go home at 
the end of each week and who wish to economize, may re- 
duce the cost of living to a very small sum. 

LIST OF STUDENTS. 

j* 

SENIORS. 

Bartlett, Rilla Jones, Barton 

Beckett, Nellie Newhy, Carl 

Bell, Flsie Redic, Rupert 

Holt, Perrin Seaford, Howard 

Johnson, Arthur Stubbs, Ralph 

Wright, Walter 

JUNIORS. 

Edwards, Warren Patterson, Clara 

Evans, Irl Patterson, Sadie 

Gardner, Ruth Painter, Anna 

Harvey, Ruth, ' Pitts, Lois 

— 21 — 



Heacock, Hazel 
Henley, Homer 
Hoover, Claire 
Jordan, Belva 
Kirkham, Bertha 
Lane, Aurie 
New by, Pansy 



Yockey, Harold 
FRESHMAN. 



Pitts, Wendell 
Reeves, Lawrence 
Rifner, Etta 
Silver, Ralph 
Smith, Bernetha 
Wright, Ethel 
Wright, Horace 



Anderson, Elsie 
Brandy, Walter 

Duke, Raymond 
Haisley, Georgia 
Hardy, Ross 
Harvey, Ethel 



Poarch, Clifford 
Reece, Jessie 

Reeves, Ruby 
Rifner, Arthur 
Stubbs, Arden 
Symons, Albert 



Thomas, Amy 
j* 

IRREGULAR. 
Coffin, Ernest Painter. Floyd 

Denner, Grace Spencer, Will 

Hoover, Clifford Taylor, Jesse 

Test, Everett 

NORMAL. 

Camplin, Nellie McGrady, John 

Hill, Nellie, Peckinpaugh, Felix 

Leaky, Mont Richey, Vaughn 

Martindale, Mae " Woodward, Laura 



ALUMNI. 

1870. 

*Eli U. Cook 

John J. Stubbs Omaha, Neb 

J871. 

Walter D. Jones Dayton. O 

*AIvin H. Jenkins 

*I. Macy Good 

C. R. Dixon Lawrence, Kan 

R. G. Boone Cincinnati, O 

Dallas Sisson Spiceland 

Mary Ballenger (Barnard) New Castle 

Louisa YVickersham ..Lewisville, R F D i 

Lida Edwards (Saint New Castle 

1872. 

Lindley H. Johnson Dun; eirfa 

*David Henley _ 

♦Jacob Hill 

Henry VV. Painter N-ew Castle, R F D i 

Robert G. Mitchell . Pacific Grove, Ca! 

1873. 

*Sadie D. Talbert (Wright) 

Aaron B. Bell Springtown, Ark 

*J. Tilman Hutchins 

John Pennington Providence, R I 

Mary Stubbs (Painter) New Castle, R F D i 

Nathan Williams Oswego, Kan 

Carrie Talbert (Newby) Wichita, Kan 

1874. 

Alice Coffin ( Russell) St Louis, Mo 

Elvira Spencer (Harrold) Indianapolis 

* Deceased. 



J. P. Edwards . Anderson 

William S. Moffit Kennard 

Edwin O Kennard Pasadena, Cal 

Nathan Rosenberger Muscatine, Iowa 

W. E. Jackson Knightstown 

D. C. Mitchell .Spiceland 

1875. 

W. W. Gregg Memphis, Tenn 

William Pidgeon Bloomington 

Irvin Stanley Westfield 

J877. 

Milton Roberts .. Lynnville, Iowa 

J878. 

S. Ella Bogue ( Dngget i Danville, Ya 

Bel le Chambers ( Estes; . New Castle 

J. Pinkney Mitchell _. Fresno, Cal 

Thomas Mitchell Knightstown 

Flora Moore (Brady; •_ Hartford City 

John O. Reed . E. Saginaw, Mich 

*William S. Sea ford '_ 

Fannie Thornburg (Parsons) . Oak Park, III 

1879. 

J. A Buck. ...Muncie 

Carrie Goodwin (Jeffrey). . .. New Castle 

Thomas Newlin _' Guilford, N C 

1880. 

j. Edgar Cloud , .Chicago, III 

Wm. N Lamb Indianapolis, Ind 

Mattie Lamb Outland ..Amboy 

Ada Grace Murphy New Castle 

Ida May Roberts Westheld 

Emma Belle Roberts Knightstown 

'"Deceased. 

— 24 — 



Frank Symons 

Lamina Trueblood (Kellum) 



Portland, Me 
Friendswood 



1881. 



*Cr,rrie Bogue 

Minnie Benedict (Blankenship) Paragon 

Carrie Unthank (Kellum) Indianapolis 

*Jessie Stratton . "-- 

1882. 

♦Arthur H. Baily. 4 

J. Newton Barnard Middletown 

Harriet Bogue (Newlin) Irvington 

Hattie E. Dickinson Spiceland 

Charles Newlin... : .... Irvington 

1883. 

Anna Hudelson (Foster) ... Washirgton, B C 

Ryland Ratliff Danville 

Julia Stafford (Newbv; New Castle, R F D 2 

Emily Weeks... . - — -Mechanksburg 

1884. 

*G>ra Kirk 

Ella Stratton (Hodson) New Castle, R F D 4 

Virginia Griffin (Cory) Dunreith 

Isadore Hall (Wilson)... Spiceland 

William Julian , Juniata, Neb 

Charles Neubv Converse 

1885. 

Marv L. Brown (Pennington) Spiceland 

Alfred Y. King — Mt - Vernon, III 

Oliver C. Steele .... — Spiceland 



* Deceased. 



1886. 



L. Winnie Bailv (Clement) Haddonfield, N J 

Mattie E. Brown Daytona, Fla 

Richard Broadbent El wood 

Elbert Griffin • Elwood 

Alonzo C Hodson : New Castle, R F D 4 

*John L. McNew 

1887. 

Herbert T. Bailv . Spiceland 

Clarence H. Beard New Castle 

Anna K Bogue (Shaffer) ' Benton Harbor, Mich 

Lindley Cnmpton Tomah, Wis 

Lizzie S. Hiatt Omaha, Neb 

Abram Miller Woodstock, Canada 

Bert Smith... Zionsville 

J888. 

Rhoda Ballenger (Cunningham) Indianapolis 

Hannah Brown (Stribbing) Dexter, Iowa 

Oryntha Brown (Jester) _ Des Moines, Iowa 

♦Jessie Butler ^ 

Clara G. Ed wards ( Knight) St. Louis, Mo 

John C Cook New Castle, R F D 2 

Elva Elliott (Compton) Tomah, Wis 

Achsah E. Ratcliff Spiceland 

H. H. Rayl Muncie 

Charles Stubbs Swayzee 

J' A. Greenstreet .. Richmond 

1889. 

Laura Benedict Indianapolis 

Blanch Braddock ( McN'ewj . Greenfield 

Frank Copeland ... Dunreith 

Estella Deem 'Kennedy) Thorntown 

Lawrence Gardner _ Spiceland 

; Deceased. 

— 26 — 



Gertrude Gordon (Genaux) „ Wilkinson 

Sue Griffin (Evans) Spiceland 

Otis Stubbs ... Lewisville, R F D 

Mary White Pasadena, Cal 

1890. 

L. Etta Butler Lewisville, R F D 

Elmer Deem Burlington 

Edwin B. Ratcliff Spiceland 

Bennie Stratton New Castle, R F D 1 

E. Stubbs Wilkinson 

1891. 

Ethel M. Copeland (Lee) Meadville, Pa 

Louie Edmundson (Poe) Knightstown 

Maurine Gardner (Kern) Cadiz 

Charles N. Hardy Mirkleville 

O. Alice Hiatt (Barrett) Spiceland 

Ernest Sisson Maxwell 

Alfred H. Symons North Manchester 

Mary M Teas Centerville 

Charles Titus . Warrington 

Herbert D. Woodard Fountain City 

1892. 

Jesse S. Bailv .. , ...Silveitofl Col 

Clara Brown Spiceland 

Warren T. Evans , Canby, Minn 

John B. Greenstreet _ Lewisville, R F D 

Winnie Hinshaw (Milligan) Winchester 

David M. Kemp . Kempton 

Alice Lawrence . Greensboro 

Estella Symons Kansas City, Mo 

Alvin Ulrich ,,. Greensboro 

1893. 

Oscar Bogue..., ... Spiceland 

Estella Charles „ Spiceland 



— 27 — 



Floy HilL- Pasadena, Cal 

Arthur Holloway Oskaloosa, Iowa 

Leora Jessup Westland 

John Miller . - — Spiceland 

Olen Pa\ ne - New Castle 

Lena Kayl . . — Spiceland 

George Smith : Greensboro 

Orville White ' Galena, 111 

J 894. 

Minnie Black (Moore) Chicago, III 

Bessie I. Brown Anderson 

Clarence V. Hall New Castle 

Horace Hardy Markleville 

Ida Holloway (Kenworihy) Kokomo 

Arlie Hood — — New Castle 

Bertha Jessup Clay Center, Neb 

Elma Lawrence - Spiceland 

Maud M.Shaffer (Payne; New Castle 

Frank Pitts... .Indianapolis 

Oscar F. Simons.. Minneapolis, Minn 

J 895. 

Clarence Painter ' _ — . Terre Haute 

Mabel Wright (Garr) .... — - Kokomo 

Edgar Cox Charleston, N C 

♦Nellie Ratliff , 

Howard Henley New Castle 

Maude Wildman (Evans) Philadelphia, Pa 

Frank Hudelson . Mays 

Pearl Moffett ( Wood ) -.. Greensboro 

1896. 

Cora Hudson... Spiceland 

Clara White Chicago 

Elsie Hudelsun Greenfield 



Deceased. 



— 28 — 



Anna Morris Lincolnville 

Pearl M. James (Tweedy) Wabash 

Mabel Newby (Hood) ..New Castle 

W.J.Carson . .. Chicago 

Nora Griffin Spiceland 

Theresa Wildman .. Philadelphia, Fa 

Koscoe Edwards.. _ .Snyder 

J 897. 

Leoti Applegate (Coffin; Spiceland 

Elva M. Hudson _' Spiceland 

Lois M. Henley . Indianapolis 

Fanny Hayes .- Dunreith 

Floy Hudelson — . Greenfield 

Josie B. Harlan (Weatherman) ... Dana 

Jessie Leaky ( Hiatt ) Lewisville, R F D 

Pearl Millikan (Hardy) Markleville 

Ethel Rifner ..Spiceland 

Mayme Stafford ... . : ..Spiceland 

Clyde Sisson — Spiceland 

Minnie Stratton (Stafford) New Castle, R F L> i 

Charlie Smith Washington, U C 

Irving White •__ Lewisville 

1898. 

Clifford Applegate Spiceland 

James Holtsclaw Spiceland 

Bavis Nay Springport 

Emory Ratcliff - New Castle, R F L> 2 

Gertrude Seaford Spiceland 

Pearl Symons Spiceland 

Lelia Smith Spiceland 

Charles A. Beard New York, N V 

Merritt Stafford . New Castle, R F U 2 

Cora Smith Spiceland 

Walter Painter New Cattle, RFDi 



— 2Q — 



t 



Bertha Charier , , Harlem, Mont 

Ernest Shock ley ...... , Strausjhn 

Elsie Shockley (Lockridgej _ Peru 

1899. 

Bessie Haisley P _«.^, „', Spiceland 

Bertha O Lawrence r „. Spiceland 

Florence O. Macy Lewisville, R F D 

Earl Moffett .... Knightstown, R F D 2 

Walter D. Pearce New Castle, R F D 2 

Orabell Shaffer... New Castle, R F D 2 

1900. 

Ethel Applegate _. Spiceland 

Edgar Ba>szle.„ Muncie 

Susan Benedict rr r -Springport 

Cora Charles ( Carson ) Logansport 

Connie Griffin rr . ,„ Alexandria 

David W. Gordon . New Castle 

Guy R Hall ,,. New Lisbon 

Clyde Kennedy Rushville 

Clarence Macy „ Lewisville, R F D 

Everest Macy , ,,— , Lewisville, R F D 

Carroll Mills Lewisville, R F D 

Cecil Newby Spiceland 

Jeannette Rifner Spiceland 

Pernia Thornbui g (Griffin ; Spiceland 

John K. Thompson Sulphur Springs 

mi. 

Ira E.Bell r r _. Spiceland 

Berth 1 E.Butler Spiceland 

Raymond Byrket El wood 

jennie Compton -- Spiceland 

Everett Cope .. Lewisville 

Deborah Edwards .,...,„ Snyder 



— 30- 



Ethel Edwards Snvder 

Lillian O. Hayes . Dunreith 

Walter B. Harvey [Junreith 

John R. Hinshaw Greensboro 

Everett Macy Lewisville, R F D 

Georgie Millikan ... Spiceland 

Jennie E. Millikan Spiceland 

Homer E. Nugen Lewisville; 

Cora E. Risk Spiceland 

Robert A. Roberts Bloomington 

Grace E. Stewart New Castle, R F D 1 

Russell L. Wright Greensboro 

Walter C. Wilson .... Spiceland 

1902. 

Harley Anderson New Castle, R F D 1 

Jessie Baily * . Hartford City- 
Mary Butler Spiceland 

Walter Byers Knightstown, R F D 1 

Jennie Kirk... Spiceland 

Gurney Maple . Lewisville 

Manning Smith Mt. Summit 

Rena Thomas Fountain City 

Recta Thomas : Fountain City- 
Russell Wilson . Spiceland 

India Yost Sulphur Springs 



KNIGHTSTOWN BANNER PRINT. 



V 



t 




Spjceland Academy 



and 



Normal School 




1903 = 1904 
Spieeland, Indiana. 



BOARD OF TRUSTEES. 



Jason W. Newby, President. 
Susan F. Baily, Secretary. 
Samuel B. Lane, Treasurer. 
Herbert T. Baiey. 
Oscar H. Bogue. 
Charles Harvey. 



INSTRUCTORS 

For Academic Year 1903=1904. 



Homer H. Cooper, A. M., Superintendent, 

History and Science. 

William Austin, 

Mathematics and Normal. 

Maude Taylor, A. B., 

Latin and English. 

Estella Charles, 

Bookkeeping, Shorthand and Typewriting. 

Emtlie Knowltox, 

Vocal and Instrumental Music. 

Nellie Hodsox, 

Elocution, Oratory and Physical Culture. 



FACULTY AND CALENDAR.. 



For the Academic Year 1904=1905. 

INSTRUCTORS. 

Homer H. Cooper, A. M., Superintendent. 
History and Science. 

William A. Austin, 

Mathematics and Normal. 

Maude Taylor, A. B., 

Latin and English. 



Bookkeeping, Shorthand and Typewriting. 
Vocal and Instrumental Music. 

Nellie G. Hodpox, 

Elocution, Oratory and Physical Culture. 

CALENDAR. 
1904. 

Fall Term begins Tuesday, September (3. 
Fall Term ends Friday, December 2-3. 
1905. 

Winter Term begins Tuesday, January 8. 
Winter Term ends Friday, March 24. 
Spring Term begins Monday, April 3. 
Four years' course closes Friday, May 2G. 
Commencement for three years' course, 
Friday, June 2.'). 



— 6 — 



SPICELAND ACADEMY. 



HISTORY. 

Spiceland Academy is the oldest academy in charge of 
the Friends in Indiana. It was chartered as an academy 
in 1870, but its history as a Friends' school extends over a 
period of seventy years. It is under the control of the 
Spiceland Monthly Meeting, by which body the Board of 
Trustees is appointed. The teachers are selected by the 
Trustees. While the school is under denominational con- 
trol, it is not sectarian in the least: its foundation rests 
upon Christian culture: it has been kept under strong 
Christian influences, and its purpo-e is to develop pra< ri« aL 
earnest, and active Christian manhood and womanhood.. 

The first class was graduated in 1870. The Alumni 
Association now enrolls about two hundred and sixty mem- 
bers. About three thousand five hundred students have 
received instruction in the school since its organization as 
an academy. 

LOCATION. 

Spiceland Academy is located in the beautiful town of 
Spiceland, Indiana, in the southern part of Henry county, 
on the Lake Erie and Western railroad, two miles north of 
Dunreith, on the Pennsylvania railroad. The building- 
are situated in the midst of a beautiful grove, adjoining 
which is a large campus, well adapted to athletic sports. 

The interurban street-car line gives connections with 
surrounding cities. 

- 7 — 



ENTRANCE. 



Students may enter at any time, but students coming 
from other schools are required to bring certificates stating 
their literary and moral standing. In the absence of ap- 
proved certificate, examinations will be held and stu- 
dents classified accordingly. Classes in Grammar School 
brandies are maintained as demand may justify, affording 
opportunity for preparatory work to students who may not 
be eligible to regular academic standing. 

The conditions for admission to the First Year class 
are the same as for entrance to the public high schools of 
this State. 

In general, graduates from the non-commissioned high 
schools of this county can enter the Academy with a credit 
of six terms' work. 

COURSE OF STUDY. 

The Academy course of study lias been arranged with 
two purposes in view : 

First — It is prepared to conform to the needs and de- 
sires of all students who may not have the opportunity to 
pursue a college course, but who desire a practical educa- 
tion which will prepare them to lead an active and suc- 
cessful life. 

Second — It is arranged to enable students to make the 
necessary preparation for admission in college without 
examination. 

A FOUR YEARS" COURSE. 

For three reasons the course of study has been in- 
creased to a four years' course. 

— 8 — 



1. To increase the advantages of Spiceland Academy 
as a finishing school for those who will not be able to pur- 
sue their work in college. 

2. To give the pupil a more thorough preparation for 
any college in the United States. 

3. To keep thoroughly up to the very best standard 
of the educational thought of the day. 

THE COURSE IN THREE YEARS. 

The course of study is so arranged that any pupil who 
may wish to complete the course in three years may do so 
by earnest and faithful work. 

Special opportunity will be given those who wish to 
take advantage of this oiler and thus save time and ex- 
pense. 

THE ENGLISH COURSE. 

The completion of the English Course will entitle one 
to a certificate of credit. It is intended for those who 
have no expectation of attending college but who wish to 
be as well prepared as possible for their work in life. 

It is to be understood that the Latin Course is the one 
required for college entrance requirements. 



— 9 ~ 



OUTLINE OF COURSE OF STUDY. 



LATIN COURSE. 

Latin ( Beginning. 
Algebra. 
Ancient History. 
Composition and 
Literature. 

Latin ( Beginning). 
Algebra. 
Ancient History. 
Composition and 
Literature. 



First Year. 

First Semester. 



Second Semester. 



Ca;sar. 
Algebra. 

*Medieval History. 
Rhetoric and Literature. 
*Arithmetic. 

Qesar. 

Plane Geometry. 
Rhetoric and Literature. 
^Medieval History 
*Physical Geography. 

Cicero. 

Plane Geometry. 
American Literature. 
^English History 
*Botany. 

Cicero. 

Solid Geometry. 
American Literature. 
^English History. 
*Botany. 

Virgil. 

English Literature. 
*United States History. 
Physics. 

^Political Economy. 
Elective. 

English Literature. 
*Civics. 
Physics. 
*Business Law. 
•"Elective; 



Second Year. 

First Semester. 



ENGLISH COURSE 

Grammar. 
Algebra. 
Ancient History. 
Composition and 
Literature. 

Physiology. 
Algebra. 
Ancient History. 
Composition and 
Literature, 



Second Semester. 



Junior. 

First Semester. 



Second Semester. 



Senior. 

First Semester, 



Second Semester. 



Arithmetic. 
Algebra. 

Medieval History. 
Rhetoric and Literature 

Physical Geography. 
Plane Geometry. 
Rhetoric and Literature 
Medieval Historv. 



Botany. 

Plane Geometry. 
American Literature. 
English History. 

Bot.-my. 

Solid Geometry. 
American Literature. 
English Historv. 



Physics. 

English Literature. 
United States History. 
Geography. 

Physiology. 
English Literature. 
Civics 
Physics. 
*Business Law. 



Advanced classes in any of the lines of study will be 
formed whenever a sufficient number of pupils desire the 
higher work. The diploma of the Academy will admit 
the student to any of the colleges of Indiana or of other 
States without entrance examinations. 

Higher classes in any subject or classes in subjects not 
offered will be formed whenever there is sufficient de- 
mand, and tuition will be charged at the same rate as for 
a fourth year study. Satisfactory work in these studies 
may be substituted for work in regular course at the dis- 
cretion of the Superintendent. 

The course of study makes provision for a number of 
electives, thus giving the student an opportunity to* select 
work along the line of his preference. The thirty-two 
credits required for graduation are distributed among the 
departments as follows: Latin, seven; English, eight: 
History, two : Mathematics, six ; Science, two ; Elective--, 
seven. 

It is especially tinged that all pupils take the regular 
Latin course of study, and after graduation attend college 
if possible?. 

Increased advantages are oli'ered in the arrangements 
made to take elective work in the following departments: 
Normal, Commercial, Music, and Elocution and Oratory. 

ENGLISH. 

The course in English is made thorough and practical. 
All the college entrance requirements are studied. Spe- 
cial attention is given to Grammar and Composition lead- 
ing to Rhetoric English and American Literature receive 
careful attention. The effort is made to rouse a real in- 



. — ii — 

■ 



» 



terest in the literature for its own sake and to increase 
the culture of the student by developing a love for the 
best in thought and style. 

HISTORY. - 

The course in History is now arranged to conform to 
the recommendations of the Committee of Seven of the 
American Historical Association. 

Besides the culture value of history, it is to be remem- 
bered that it is the study which furnishes the student the 
ideals of character which lead to the highest moral growth. 
The student should thoroughly understand the institutional 
life of the people studied. 

The purposes of history in the Academy are as follows : 

•First — The development of moral character. History 
as the study of institutional life and of character teaches 
us to watcli the progress (if humanity in the rise and fall 
of nations. Successor failure in national life or in the 
life of a person will cause us to adopt for ourselves and our 
country that which lias proven of excellent worth. His- 
tory helps us to avoid the mistakes of other people and 
nations. 

Second — the teaching of patriotism and the broaden- 
ing of our interests and sympathies. While we wish to be 
familiar with our own government and national character 
we must recognize the broad principle of the universal 
brotherhood of men. 

Third — The development of our powers of judgment. 
It is here that we especially study the relation between 
cause and effect. Every statesman has been a student of 
history. In studying the problems of life which have con- 



— 12 — 



fronted other people we are greatly aided in the practical 
solution of the life problems of to-day. 

Fourth — The acquirement of useful facts. This, 
though generally considered of the most importance, is 
in fact but a subordinate purpose in the study of history. 

Fifth — The gaining of a broad and practical general 
culture. The work consists of a study of Ancient History 
in the first year; a special study of Medieval and Modern 
History in the second year; of English History in the 
third year; IT. S. History and Civil Government in the 
fourth year. 

MATHEMATICS. 

The aim in this study is to introduce .the student to 
mathematical methods and develop in him the power to 
reason clearly and accurately on any given problem. Al- 
gebra is studied throughout the first year of the High 
School and the first half of second year; Geometry during 
the last half of second year and through the third year. 
A great deal of supplementary work is given in Algebra, 
and original exercises are introduced as much as possible 
in Geometry. Astronomy is studied during the winter 
of the third year. In this subject the work is largely de- 
scriptive. 

A good six-inch telescope belongs to the Academy. 
LATIN. 

There is no subject in the Academy which has greater 
disciplinary value to the pupil than the study of Latin. 
It trains and strengthens the memory, cultivates and 
quickens the perception, and developes habits of ready, 
accurate, and sound thinking. 

— 13 — 



A very large per cent, of all the words used in the 
dictionary will be of Latin origin, therefore some knowl- 
edge of this subject is absolutely necessary for a correct 
understanding of our own English language. It gives us 
a key to a quicker understanding. of all that we read or 
hear. It is essential to all who are to continue the work 
in college. It is helpful to every professional man. It 
will give us a greater appreciation of the Latin writers 
and speakers. It increases our general culture and con- 
tributes to our broader discipline. 

The course in Latin is. required of all who receive a 
diploma. In special cases, to tit the student for college, 
equivalent subjects may be substituted. 

SCIENCE. 

The Academy is supplied with sufficient apparatus to 
be a valuable aid in the study of the natural sciences. In 
Physics the subject is illustrated by many simple pieces 
of apparatus, besides the air-pump, electrical machine, 
batteries, etc. In Chemistry! students do practical work 
work in the laboratory, which is supplied with necessary 
chemicals and apparatus. Geology and Mineralogy are 
illustrated by a collection of more than twelve hundred 
specimens', presented to the Academy by the Alumni. In 
Zoology and Botany, animals and plants are studied from 
nature, and systems of classifications are made prominent. 
In all the sciences objects are used as much as possible. 
The following are the purposes in Science work : 
First — To interest the pupil hi the observation of na- 
ture. 



— 14 — 



Second- -To develop the power of reasoning through 
the original investigation of the truths of nature. 

Third — To give a practical knowledge of the elemen- 
tary principles of those sciences which are now, in a great 
measure, causing our rapid progress in the civilization of 
the world. 



NORMAL DEPARTMENT. 

For several years past special arrangements have been 
made to give those students desiring to teach, the oppor- 
tunity of normal instruction during the Spring term. A 
special normal instructor has been employed, and many 
students of this and adjoining counties have availed them- 
selves of this opportunity. 

The increasing demand for normal work and for a more 
extended course than can be giveiJ during the Spring term, 
has induced the Board to add a Normal Department that 
provides for a full year's work of three terms, as follows: 



Fall Term. j ist Grammar. 


1st Arithmetic. 


ist U. S. History. 


Physiology. 


Winter Term 2d Grammar. 


2d Ai ithmetic. 


2d U. S. History. 


ist Geography. 


i 

"Spring Term, j Method. 


Reading. 


Psychology. 


2d Geography. 



■ All the common tranches are offered in this term. 



In the Fall term, classes will be organized with the 
view of continuing the work throughout the year. Dur- 
ing the Winter term, those having started in the Fall will 
advance to the next work in the course. 

In the Spring term, classes will be provided for those 
beginning the Normal work, and for those who have done 



» 



one term's work. It is thus seen that all the legal branches, 
Psychology and Method, may be had. in the Spring term. 

It is not the purpose of high schools to give, students 
a teacher's knowledge of the legal branches. However, it 
is known that many high-school graduates desire to teach. 
This course of Normal work is especially fitted for this 
class of students, and for students having graduated from 
common schools who wish to get a more comprehensive 
knowledge of the legal branches, and learn correct meth- 
ods of teaching them. Psychology, Pedagogy and Method 
will be given to make work characteristically professional. 

In the Normal course it is not intended to conduct a 
scheme of cramming for examination, but it is our inten- 
tion to help teachers in their school quite as much as to 
aid them to get licenses. 

Work will be so arranged that students who desire to 
take part academic work anil part normal work will be 
accommodated. 



COMMERCIAL COURSE. 

A thorough Business Course is now offered and will be 
taught by a practical and experienced teacher. Bookkeep- 
ing, Typewriting, Shorthand and Business Law are taught. 

It is desired that this course be thorough and com- 
plete. The student will gain a practical knowledge of his 
subject that will enable hi in to hold responsible positions 
in business life. The expenses are lower than in city bus- 
iness colleges. The student has the advantage of taking 
any desired subject in the academic department. The 
student's surroundings are of the best. 

— 16 — 



COURSE IN MUSIC. 



Vocal and instrumental music will be taught by an 
experienced teacher. 

In the beginning course students who have known 
nothing of music will be taught to read readily and sum 
ordinary church music. Advanced work will be given to 
prepare students to form and conduct chorus classes ami 
to teach music in the public schools. 

Excellent opportunity will be ottered to all students 
who wish to take special courses in instrumental music. 



COURSES IN ELOCUTION AND ORATORY. 

First Term's Work — Vocal training and vocal expres- 
sion. Correct mental action in reading and speaking. 
Development of the oratorio and dramatic instincts. Study 
of American poets and orators. Organic gymnastic-. 
Laws of gesture and pantomime. 

Secoxd Term's Work — Training in advanced voice and 
pantomime. Literature. Study of short plays. Mono- 
logues and impersonation. Harmonic physical training. 

Third Term's Work — Phonology, Harmony and Unity. 
Literature. Conversation and discussion. Dramatic train- 
ing. Shakespeare. 

The expenses will be very low. Free private drills 
will be given. A thoroughly trained teacher is in charge 
of this work. 



GENERAL ITEMS. 



The government of the school is based upon the idea 
that manhood is more than scholorship ; that self-respect 
and self-control on the part of the student are important 
factors in the formation of character. Greater stress is 
laid upon the thoroughness of instruction and accuracy of 
knowledge than upon rapidity of advancement. 

For man}' years the health of students has been uni- 
formly good. There is probably no better location in the 
State in this respect. 

The Friends and Methodists both hold religious ser- 
vices on the Sabbath and each maintains a Sabbath school. 
Meetings of the Young People's Society of Christian En- 
deavor and the Epworth League are held every Sabbath 
evening, and student? are welcomed to their meetings and 
membership. 

A sufficient number of teachers is constantly employed 
so that large classes may be avoided, and students may 
receive personal attention during the recitation. 

Expenses are as low as at any other school affording 
equal advantages. 

The managers of the school are very careful to make 
tli is an institution in which students who are away from 
home ami its restraints will he surrounded by good, moral 
influences, and in this they have the co-operation of the 
citizens of the village. 

There are no beer, liquor or billiard saloons in the city. 

No student whose influence is known to have a cor- 
rupting tendency will be retained in the school. 

— 18 — 



DIPLOMAS. 



Students whose conduct is exemplary, and who com- 
plete the course of study ami prepare and deliver a suita- 
ble literary production, will be furnished a diploma, signed 
by the instructors and the President and Secretary of the 
Board of Trustees. 

LECTURES. 

Students have the opportunity to hear good lectures 
at small expense. Addresses on various subjects are 
given during the year by able speakers. 

Public exercises in declamation will be given by the 
First Year class at the end of the Fall term.. 

LITERARY EXERCISES. 

Literary exercises are required of all students in c'l] 
grades, both in class work and before the public, (.'are is 
used that students may learn the art of composition and 
public delivery. Essays and declamations are a part of 
the regular school work. 

ORATORY AND ELOCUTION. 

There is an Oratorical Association which is associated 
with similar organization of students of Fairmount, Cen- 
tral and Westlield Academies in the Inter-Academic Ora- 
torical Association of Indiana. In each school a conte-t 
is held in oratory and declamation. The successful con- 
testant in each department represents his school in an 
Inter- Academic contest held in April. 



— 19 — 



LIBRARIES. 



Four sets of encyclopedias are in the school rooms, 
and these, with the dictionaries and numerous reference 
hooks, are for the free use of all. There are three libra- 
ries in connection with the school, which comprise about 
three thousand volumes, two of them belonging to the 
Literary Society, and the other to the Academy Associa- 
tion. 

TEXTS USED DURING THE YEAR. 

First Latin Daniel 

Classics Various Texts 

English Selections 

Rhetoric Kavana 

English Literature Painter 

Algebra Wells 

Geometry "Went worth 

Physical Geography -Davis 

Physics 1 Gage 

Chemistry Cooley 

Astronomy ' Steel-Todd 

Botany Bailey 

Psychology 1 Halleck 

English History Wrong 

General History 

Civics Fiske 

Political Economy Walker 

U. S. History Channing 

Grammar _• Wisely 

Physiology Macy and Norris 



— 20 — 



EXPENSES. 

RATES OF TUITION. 

Grammar School, four studies 75 cents per week 

First Year Academic, for each study. --20 
Second Year Academic, " " ,,-22§ " 
Junior Year Academic, " " ---22A 
Senior Year Academic, ', ---25 

Normal Classes, ' ---25 

Students who enter at irregular times will be charged 
full tuition for the term in case they complete the term's 
work in such manner as to receive credit toward the 
diploma. 

Normal students and others who do not expect to earn 
credit in the regular course will be charged only for the 
time of actual enrollment in the classes. 

Occasionally those who are especially strong are per- 
mitted to earn credits by outside study under the super- 
vision of the teachers. For such credits as these one-halt 
the regular tuition will be charged. 

Tuition is due at the opening of each term/and settle- 
ment should be made with the Superintendent or the 
Treasurer of the Board of Trustees. Students will re- 
ceive no credit for their work until the tuition is paid. 

BOARDING. 

The citizens of Spiceland have always given the stu- 
dents a hearty welcome by receiving them into their homes. 
The cost of boarding and rooms in private families where 
everything is furnished can be had for $2.00 to $3.00 a 
week. Rooms, both furnished and unfurnished, can be 
had from 25 to 50 cents a week, and table board of excel- 
lent quality at the rate of $1.50 to $2.00 for the full week. 

Thus rjersons who may live near enough to go home at 
the end of each week and who wish to economize, may re- 
duce the cost of living to a very small sum. 

— 21 — 



LIST OF STUDENTS. 



SENIORS. 



Bell, Elsie 


Newby, Pansy 


Beeson, Josephine 


Painter, Anna 


Benedict, Will 


Patterson, Clara 


Bridges, Lawrence 


Pitts, Lois 


Edwards, Warren 


Pitts, Wendell 


Evans, Irl 


Reeves, Lawrence 


Gordon, Jessie 


x\ee\ e>, rvobert 


Harvey, Ruth 


Rifner, Etta 


Seacock, Hazel 


Rogers, John 


TT 1 tt- 

Henley, Homer 


Seaford, Herbert 


T T *- ■ 1 • 

Hoover, Claire 


Silver, Ralph 


Jones, Barton 


Smith, Bernetlia 


Jordan, Belva 


Veach, Charles 


May, (niv 


Wright, Ethel 


l r oekey, Harol 


d 


JUNIORS. 




Anderson, Elsie ] 


'ope, Edward 


Brandy, Walter ] 


'oarch, Clifford 


Colliugwood, Golclie J 


ieece, Jessie 


Duke, Raymond } 


Jeeves, Ruby 


Grano, Alexander } 


'eeves, Anna 


Gardener, Ruth 1 


iifner, Arthur 


Gritlin, Oran g 


hipman, Roy 


Haskett, Chesleinh § 


tubbs, Arden 


Kennard, Elva r j 


est, Everett 


Lane, Anrie i 


liomas, Amv 



Patterson, Sadie Wilson, Paul 

Ricks, Otis 



FIRST YEAR. 



Allen, Grace 


Hudelson, Arthur 


Bundy, Charles 


Hudelson, Ha/el 


Bundy, Walter 


Lane, Koena 


Carmichael, Lulu 


Muffiy, Dan 


Carlton, Marshall 


Nutren, Frances 


Clark, Eula 


Painter, Levin us 


Duke, Warren 


Painter, Myron 


Emminger, Jessie 


Kedic, Vida 


English, Fred 


Seaford, Mabel 


troiclon, Edna 


Simmons, Maud 


Griffin, James 


Stubbs, George 


Griffin, Everett 


Symons, Albert 


Griffin, Harry 


Thomas, Pearl 


Harvey, Everett 


Tliomas, Jessie 


Hatfield, Walter 


Wilson, Lowell 


Hershauer, Clifford 


Wilson, Daniel 


Holt, Howard 


Wright, Miriam 


IRREGULAR. 


Beach, Agnes 


Spencer, Will 


Holtsclaw, George 


Wilson, Lucile 


Millikan, Jennie 


Wright, Horace 



NORMAL. 

Judge, Inez 
Riser, Elmer 
Matthews, Clifford 
McGrady, John 
Painter, Floyd 
Rock hi 11, Howard 
Stubbs, Ralph 
Smith, Lena 
Williams. Wester 



Beavers, A V ill 
Beckett, Nellie 
Copeland, Agnes 
Coffin. J. A. 
Cotlin, Ernest 
Daugherty, John 
Gray, Mabel 
Harvey, Ethel 
Hoover, Edgar 



ALUMNI. 

1S70 

*Eli U. Cook -J.^U.,. 

John J. Stubbs Omaha, Neb 

1871 

Walter D. Jones Dayton, O 

*Alvin H. Jenkins 

*f. Macy Good 

C. R. Dixon Lawrence, Kan 

R. G. Boone Cincinnati, 

Dallas Sisson Spiceland 

Mary Ballenger (Barnard) New Castle 

Louisa Wickersham Lewisville, R F D 1 

Lida Edwards (Saint)- New Castle 

1872 

Lindley H. Johnson Dunreith 

*David Henley.. 

*Jacob Hill... Kfitfflr"- 

Henry \V. Painter New Castle, RFD 1 

Robert G. Mitchell Pacific Grove, Cal 

1873 

♦Sadie D. Talbert (Wright) 

Aaron B. Bell Springtown, Ark 

*J. Tilman Hutchins 

John Pennington Cincinnati, O 

Maty Stubbs (Painter). New Castle, R F D r 

Nathan Williams Oswego, Kan 

Carrie Talberc (Newby) Wichita, Kan 

1S74 

Alice Coffin (Russell) St. Louis, Mo 

Elvira Spencer (Harrold) Indianapolis 

"Deceased. 

— 24 — 



..Anderson 

T. P. Edwards 

J ,,■«•■ Kennard 

William S. Morfit 

a \ j . .Pasadena, Cal 

Edwin 0. Kennard . 

Muscatine, Iowa 

Nathan Rosenberger . 

„ , Knightstown 

W.E.Jackson t & , , 

J , Spiceland 
D.C.Mitchell.-- •- 

iS7t 

Memphis, Tenn 

W.W.Gregg ~ B1 ' 00 mington 

William Pidgeon -- " ~ : _ Westfield 

Irvin Stanley 

iS77 

Lynnville, Iowa 
Milton Roberts J 

1878 ]'£~Z W*<d*l<*'.fc. C*»a*» 

'1. ' Danville, Va 

S. Ella Bogue (Dogget) 

lT - < ---New Castle 

Belle Chambers (Estes) 

... , ,, Fresno 

J. Pinknev Mitchell . 

Thomas Mitchell ...Hartford City 

Flora Moore (Brady) E. Saginaw, Mich 

John O. Reed 

*William S. Seaford 

,t> _.Oak Park, lu 

Fannie Thornburg (Parsons) 

1879 

.Muncie 

J. A. Buck — " "/.".Newcastle 

Carrie Goodwin (Jeffrey) - Guilford, N C 

Thomas Newlin - --- 

1880 

..Chicago, Iil 

J.Edgar Cloud - -- — __, nd j^ , is 

Wm. N.Lamb " JA 

Mattie Lamb Outland 

Ada Grace Murphy We^theld 

Ida May Roberts """fciigtatoirt 

Emma Belle Roberts 



-Deceased. 



-25- 



Frank Symons 

T i**; -r u, j Portland, Me 

Lamira Trueblood (Kellum) c- • J , 

' t nendswood 

■ 1881 ■ ' ' 

Oscar R. Baker 

*r- • t-> " inchester 

*Corne Bogue 

Minnie Benedict ( Blankenship) p"' V 

Carrie L'nthank (Kellum) ','Z arag ° n 

*Jessie Stratton -JZIZZI^ Ind.anapol.s 

1882 

*Arthur H. Baily 

J. Newton Barnard 

Harriet Bogue (Xewlinf " Middletown 

Hattie E. Dickinson Imngton 

Charles. Xewlin..... "* " Spiceland 

--- Irvington 

1SS3 

Anna Hudelson (Foster) ,,r , - 

Ryland Ratliff " Washington, £> C 

Julia Stafford (Xevvbv) .--,..,DanyWe 
Emily Weeks..,. --New Castle, R F D 2 

Mechanicsburg 

1884 

*Cora Kirk 

Ella-Stratton CHodsnn) lr"'W", 

v - . „ . .. ; " New Cast e, R F D 1 

Virginia Grilfin (Cory) . 4 

Isadore Hall (Wilson) Dunreith 

William Julian Spiceland 

Charles Xewbv •"""."".*."" "' " — J un, ' ata ' 

Converse 

1885 

Mary L. Brown (Pennington) - , 

Alfred Y. Kin- ' Spiceland 

Oliver C.Steele " ' Mt. Vernon, 111 

- Spiceland 

''Deceased. 

— 26 — 



1886 

L. Winnie Baily (Clement) Haddenfield, X J 

Mattie E. Brown Daytona, Fia 

Richard Broadbent Elwood 

Elbert Griffin Elwood 

Alonzo C. Hodson New Castle, R F D 4 

*John L. McNew 

1S87 

Herbert T. Baily Spiceland 

Clarence H. Beard New Castle 

Anna K. Bogue (Shaffer) Benton Harbor, Mich 

Lindley Compton Toniah, Wis 

Lizzie S. Hiatt (Genau) Crete, Neb 

Abram Miller Woodstock, Canada 

Bert Smith • Zionsville 

1888 



Rhoda Ballenger (Cunningham) Indianapc 

Hannah Brown (Stribbing) Dextor, Iowa 

Oryntha Brown (Jester) Des Moines, Iowa 

*Jessie Butler i 

Clara G. Edwards (Knight) St. Louis, Mo 

John C. Cook ...New Castle, R F D 2 

Elva Elliott (Compton) . Tomah, Wis 

Achsah E. Ratcliff New Castle 

H. H. Rayl _ .Muncie 

*Charles Stubbs Swazee 

J. A. Greenstreet Richmond 

H. H. Ratcliff . Spiceland 

1889 

Laura Benedict Indianapoiis 

Blanch Braddock (McXew) Greenfield 

Frank Copeland Dunreith 

Estella Deem (Kennedy) Thorntown 

*Lawrence Gardner Spiceiand 



Deceased. 



Gertrude Gordon (Genaux) 

Sue Griffin (Evans) T Wilkinson 

OtisStubbs Spiceland 

Mary White Lewisville, RFD 

Pasadena, Cal 

1890 

L. Etta Butler 

Elmer Deem Lewisville, RFD 

Edwin B. Ratcliff Burlington 

Bennie Stratton Spiceland 

S. E. Siubhs... Newcastle, R F D 1 

Wilkinson 

1891 

Ethel M. Copeland (Leo 

Louie Edmundson (Poe) "" Meadville, Pa 

Maurine Gardner (Kern) Kmghtstown 

Charles X, Hardy Cadiz 

0. Alice Hiatt (Copeland) Markleville 

Ernest Sisson ... Sabina, O 

Alfred H. Symons .\_7~7 Maxwell 

Mary M. Teas " North Manchester 

Charles Titus.... ' ----Centerville 

Herbert D. Woodard" " - — Warrington 

Fountain City 

1892 ' 

Jesse S. Baily 

Clara Brown " ---Silverton, Col 

Warren T. Evans... '" Spiceland 

John B. Greenstreet Canby ' Minn 

Winnie Hinshaw (MH^an) Lewisville, RFD 

David M. Kemp Winchester 

Alice Lawrence.... """ Kempton 

Estella Symons. Greensboro 

Alvin Ulrich Kansas City, Mo 

Greensboro 

1893 

Oscar Bogue.. 



Floy Hill Pasadena, Cal 

Arthur Holloway Oskaloosa, Iowa 

Leora Jessup (Parker)... Westland 

John Miller Spiceland 

Olen Payne , . New Castle 

Lena Ravi Spiceland 

George Smith Greensboro 

Orville White Galena, Kan 

. 1894 

Minnie Black (Moore) Chicago, 111 

Bessie I. Brown Daytona. Fia 

Clarence V. Hall New Castle 

Horace Hardy j Markleville 

Ida Holloway (Kenvvorthy) Kokomo 

Arlie Hood New Castle 

Bertha Jessup Clay Center. Neb 

Elma Lawrence Spicejanci 

Maud M. Shaffer ( Payne) Newcastle 

Frank Pitts Indianapolis 

Oscar F. Symons Minneapolis, Minn 

1895 

Clarence Painter Terre Haute 

Mabel Wright (Garr) Kokomo 

Edgar Cox -- Clarkton, N C 

"Nellie Ratliff . 

Howard Henley New Castle 

Maude Wihiman (Evans) _ Philadelphia, Pa 

Frank Hudelson. ..Mays 

Pearl Moffett (Wood) Greensboro 

1896 

Cora Hudson (Bogue) Spiceland 

Clara White Chicago 

Elsie Hudelson - Greenfield 



^Deceased. 



— 29 — 



1 



Anna Morris 

Pearl M. James (Tweedyj'Iu Lincolnville 

Mabel Newby (Hood).... " ." Wabash 

W.J Carson ... New Castle 

Nora Griffin (Beach) Chicago 

Theresa Wildman " Spiceland 

Roscoe Edwards......!] Philadelphia, Pa 

Snyder 

1S97 

Leoti Applegate (Coffin).. 

Elva M. Hudson (Hall).... \] Spiceland 

Lois M. Henley. Spiceland 

Fanny Hayes... Indianapolis 

Floy Hudelson Dunreith 

Josie B. Harlan (Weatherman)"." Greenfield 

Jessie Leaky (Hiatt) Dana 

Pearl Millikan (Hardy) Lewisville, RFD 

Ethel Rifner " Markleville 

Mayme Stafford (Applegate";" Spiceland 

Clyde Sisson & _ Spiceland 

Minnie Stratton (Stafford) ~ S P''celand 

Charles Smith w Castle, R F D 1 

Irving White ~ --Washington, D C 

Lewisville 

i8q& 

Clifford Applegate 

James Holtsclaw -Spiceland 

Bavis Nay Spiceland 

Emorv Ratcliff Springport 

Gertrude Sea ford ..."."."."."."."." New Castle, RFD: 

Pearl Symons Spiceland 

Lelia Smith " r Spiceland 

Charles A. Beard " Spiceland 

Merritt Stafford New Vork - N ¥ 

Cora Smith ~'_.L NeW CaStle ' R F D 2 

Walter Painter -Spiceland 

Bertha Charles '.HI "1211 New Cast,e . RFDi 

"" Harlem, Mont 

— 30 — 



Ernest Shockley 

Elsie Shockley (Lockri dge) 



Straughn 
Peru 



1899 

Bessie Haisley Spiceland 

Bertha O Lawrence Spiceland 

Florence O. Macy. Lewisville, RFD 

Earl Moffett Knigbtstown, R F D 2 

Walter D. Pearce .New Castle, R F D 3 

Orabell Shaffer. New Castle, R F D 2 

1900 

Ethel Applegate r Spiceland 

Edgar Bazzle . Muncie 

Susan Benedict .1 ■ Springport 

Cora Charles (Carson; Logansport 

Connie Griffin - Alexandria 

David W. Gordon Indianapolis 

'£uy H. Hall '■ . New Lisbon 

Clyde Kennedy Rushvi.ic 

Clarence Macy Lewisville, RFD 

Everest Macy ..Lewisville, RFD 

Carroll Mills..... Lewisville, RFD 

Cecil Newby Spiceland 

Jeannette Rifner Spiceland 

Pernia Thornburg (Griffin) Spiceland 

John R.Thompson Sulphur Springs 

igoi 

Ira E. Bell Spiceland 

Bertha E. Butler ... Spiceland 

Raymond Byrket ..Elwood 

Jennie Compton Spiceland 

Everett Cope .— : ..-.Lewisville 

Deborah Edwards --- Snyder 

Ethel Edwards .- Snyder 

Lillian H. Hayes... . .Dunreith 

Walter B. Harvey Dunreith 



*4. 



4fi 



■r-VPZZP^* 5 ^^ T r --.>- j: 



John R. Hinshaw . Greensboro 

Everett Macy Lewisville, R F D 

Georgie Millikan Spiceland 

Jennie E. Millikan Spiceland 

Homer E. Nugen Lewisville 

Cora E. Risk Spiceland 

Robert A. Roberts Bloomington 

Grace E. Stewart . New Castle, R F D I 

Russell L. Wright Greensboro 

Walter C. Wilson Spiceland 

1902 

Harley Anderson New Castle, R F D 1 

Tessie Baily Hartford City 

Mary Butler ^ Spiceland 

Walter Byers Knlghtstown, R F D 2 

Jennie Kirk Spiceland 

Gurney Maple Lewisville 

Manning Smith Mt. Summit 

Rena Thomas Fountain City 

Ketta Thomas Fountain City 

Russell Wilson Spiceland 

India Yost (Cook) Sulphur Springs 

1903 

Rilla Bartlett Lewisville 

Nellie Beckett Spiceland 

Perrin Holt ...Greensboro 

Arthur Johnson Dunreith 

Carl Newby Spiceland 

Rupert Redic Knightstown, R F D 

Ralph Stubbs ...Spiceland 

Walter Wright Greensboro 




KNIGHTSTOWN BANNER PKINT. 




1904- 1905 



SPICELAND 
ACADEMY AND NORMAL 
SCHOOL. 



SPICELAND, INDIANA 



FACULTY AND CALENDAR 

For the Academic Year 



INSTRUCTORS. 

Homer H. Cooper, A. M., Superintendent, 
History and Science. 

William A. Austin, 
Mathematics and Normal. 

Emma Kendall, A. B., 
Latin and English. 

Helen Garvin, 
Music. 



CALENDAR. 

J 905. 

Fall Term begins Tuesday, September 25. 
Fall Term ends Friday, December 22. 
1906. 

Winter Term begins Tuesday, January 2. 
Winter Term ends Friday, March 16. 
Spring Term begins Tuesday, March 27. 
Commencement, Friday, June 15. 



BOARD OF TRUSTEES. 



Charles B. Harvey, President. 
Effie A. Hall, Secretary. 
Jesse Bell, Treasurer.' 
Oscar H. Bogue. 
Harriet E. Dickinson. 
Alyin Painter. 



INSTRUCTORS 

For Academic Year I904-J905. 



Homer H. Cooper, A. M., Superintendent, 
History and Science. 

William A. Austin, 
Mathematics and Normal. 

Maude Taylor, A. B., 
Latin and English. 

Roscoe Edwards, 
Normal. 

Helen Garvin, 
Music. 

Nellie Hodson, 
Elocution and Oratory. 



— 6 — 



SPICELAND ACADEMY. 



HISTORY. 

— , I PICELAND ACADEMY is the oldest academy in 
charge of the Friends in Indiana. It was char- 
tered as an academy in 1870, but its history a? a 
Friends' school extends over a period of seventy 
years. It is under the control of the Spiceland Monthly 
Meeting, by which body the Board of Trustees is appointed. 
The teachers are selected by the Trustees. While the 
school is under denominational control, it is not sectarian 
in the least; its foundation rests upon Christian culture ; 
it has been kept under strong Christian influences, and its 
purpose is to develop practical, earnest, and active Chris- 
tian manhood and womanhood. 

The first class was graduated in 1S70. The Alumni 
Association now enrolls about two hundred and ninety 
members. About three thousand five hundred students 
have received instruction in the school since its organiza- 
tion as an academy, 

LOCATION. 

Spiceland Academy is located in the beautiful town of 
Spiceland, Indiana, in the southern part of Henry county, 
on the Lake Erie and Western railroad, two miles north of 
Dunreith, on the Pennsylvania railroad. The buildings 
are situated in the midst of a beautiful grove, adjoining 
which is a large campus, well adapted to athletic sports. 

The interurban street-car line gives connections with 
surrounding cities. 

— 7 — 



ENTRANCE. 



Students may enter at any time, but students coming 
from other schools are required to bring certificates stat- 
ing their literary and moral standing. In the absence of 
approved certificate, examinations will be held and stu- 
dents classified accordingly. Classes in Grammar School 
branches are maintained as demand may justify, affording 
opportunity for preparatory work to students who may not 
be eligible to regular academic standing. 

The conditions for admission to the First Year class 
are the same as for entrance to the public high schools of 
this State. 

In general, graduates from non-commissioned high 
schools of this county can enter the Academy with credit 
for the number of months 1 work he has studied in his 
home school wherein the work is up to the standard of the 
commissioned high school. 

COURSE OF STUDY. 

The Academy course of study has been arranged with 
two purposes in view : 

First — It is prepared to conform to the needs and de- 
sires of all students who may not have the opportunity to 
pursue a college course', but who desire a practical educa- 
tion which will prepare them to lead an active and suc- 
cessful life. 

Second — It is arranged to enable studeuts to make 
the necessary preparation for admission in college with- 
out examination. 

— 8 — 



A FOUR YEARS' COURSE. 



- For three reasons the course of study has been in- 
creased to a four years' course. 

1. To increase the advantages of Spiceland Academy 
as a finishing school for those who will not be able to pur- 
sue their work in college. 

2. To give the pupil a more thorough preparation for 
any college in the United States. 

3. To keep thoroughly up to the very best standard 
of the educational thought of the day. 

THE COURSE IN THREE YEARS. 

The course of study is so arranged that any pupil who 
may wish to complete the course in three years may do so 
by earnest and faithful work. 

Special opportunity will be given those who wish to 
take advantage of this offer and thus save time and ex- 
pense. 

THE ENGLISH COURSE. 

The completion of the English Course will entitle one 
to a certificate of credit. It is intended for those who 
have no expectation of attending college but who wish to 
be as well prepared as possible for their work in life. 

It is to be understood that the Latin Course is the one 
required for college entrance requirements. 



OUTLINE OF COURSE OF STUDY. 



LATIN COURSE. 

Latin (Beginning). 
Algebra. 
Ancient History. 
Composition and Literature. 



FIRST YEAR. 

FIRST semester. 



ENGLISH COURSE. 

Grammar. 
Algebra. 
Ancient History. 
Composition and Literature. 



SECOND SEMESTER. 



Latin (Beginning). 
Algebra, 
Ancient History. 
Composition and Literature. 

SECOND YEAR. 

FIRST SEMESTER, 



Physiology. 
Algebra, 
Ancient History. 
Composition and Literature. 



Caesar. 

Algebra. 

Modern History. 

Rhetoric and Literature. 

♦Arithmetic. 

Caesar. 

Plane Geometry. 
Rhetoric and Literature. 
Modern History. 
♦Physical Geography. 

Cicero. 

Plane Geometry. 
American Literature. 
♦English History. 
♦Botany. 

Cicero. 

Solid Geometry. 
American Literature. 
♦English History. 
♦Botany. 

Virgil. 

English Literature. 
♦United States History. 
Physics. 

♦Political Economy. 
Elective. 

English Literature. 
♦Civics. 
Physice. 
♦Business Law. 



SECOND SEMESTER. 



Arithmetic. 
Algebra. 

Medieval History. 
Rhetoric and Literature. 

Physical Geography. 
Plane Geometry. 
Rhetoric and Literature. 
Medieval History. 



JUNIOR. 

FIRST SEMESTER. 



SECOND SEMESTER. 



Botany. 

Plane Geometry. 
American Literature. 
English History. 

Botany. 

Solid Geometry. 
American Literature. 
English History. 



SENIOR. 

FIRST SEMESTER. 



SECOND SEMESTER. 



Physics. 

English Literature. 
United States History. 
Geography. 

English Literature. 
Civics. 
Physics. 
♦Business Law. 



-Elective. 



Advanced classes in any of the lines of study will be 
formed whenever a sufficient number of pupils desire the 
higher work. The diploma of the Academy will admit 
the student to any of the colleges of Indiana or of other 
States without entrance examinations. 

Higher classes in any subject or classes in subjects 
not offered will be formed whenever there is sufficient de- 
mand, and tuition will be charged at the same rate as for 
a fourth year study. Satisfactory work in these studies 
may be substituted for work in regular course, at the dis- 
cretion of the Superintendent. 

The course of study makes provision for a number of 
electives, thus giving the student an opportunity to select 
work along the line of his preference. The thirty-two 
credits required for graduation are distributed among i e 
departments as follows: Latin, seven; English, eight; 
History, two; Mathematics, six ; Science, two; Electives, 
seven. 

It is especially urged that all pupils take the regular 
Latin course of study, and after graduation attend college 
if possible. 

Increased advantages are offered in the arrangements 
made to take elective work in the following departments: 
Normal, Music, and Elocution and Oratory. 

ENGLISH. 

The course in English is made thorough and practical. 
All the college entrance requirements are studied. Spe- 
cial attention is given to Grammar and Composition lead- 
ing to Rhetoric. English and American Literature receive 
careful attention. The effort is made to rouse a real in- 

— it — 



terest in the literature for its own sake and to increase 
the culture of the student by developing a love for the 
best in thought and style. 

HISTORY. 

The course in History is now arranged to conform to 
the recommendations of the Committee of Seven of the 
American Historical Association. 

Besides the culture value of history, it is to be remem- 
bered that it is the study which furnishes the student the 
ideals of character which lead to the highest moral growth. 
The student should thoroughly understand the institu- 
tional life of the people studied. 

The purposes of history in the Academy are as follows : 

First — The development of moral character. History 
as the study of institutional life and of character teaches 
us to watch the progress of humanity in the rise and fall 
of nations. Success or failure in national life or in the 
life of a person will cause us to adopt for ourselves and 
our country that which has proven of excellent worth. 
History helps us to avoid the mistakes of other people and 
nations. 

Second — The teaching of patriotism and the broaden- 
ing of our interests and sympathies. While we wish to be 
familiar with our own government and national character 
we must recognize the broad principle of the universal 
brotherhood of men. 

Third — The development of our powers of judgment. 
It is here that we especially study the relation between 
cause and effect. Every statesman has been a student of 
history. In studying the problems of life which have con- 



fronted other people w r e are greatly aided in the practical 
solution of the life problems of to-day. 

Fourth — The acquirement of useful facts. This, 
though generally considered of the most importance, is in 
fact but a subordinate purpose in the study of history. 

Fifth — The gaining of a broad and practical general 
culture. The work consists of a study of Ancient History 
in the first year; a special study of Medieval and Modern 
History in the second year; of English History in the 
third year; U. S. History and Civil Government in the 
fourth vear. 

MATHEMATICS. 

The aim in this study is to introduce the student to 
mathematical methods and develop in him the power to 
reason clearly and accurately on any given problem. Al- 
gebra is studied throughout the first year of the High 
School and the first half of second year; Geometry during 
the last half of second year and through the third year. 
A great deal of supplementary work is given in Algebra, 
and original exercises are introduced as much as possible 
in Geometry. Astronomy is studied during the' winter of 
the third year. In this subject the. work is largely de- 
scriptive. • 

A good six-inch telescope belongs to the Academy. 
LATIN. 

There is no subject in the Academy which has greater 
disciplinary value to the pupil than the study of Latin. 
It trains and strengthens the memory, . cultivates and 
quickens the perception, and developes habits of ready, 
accurate, and sound thinking. 

— 13 — 



A very large per cent, of all the words used in the 
dictionary will be of Latin origin, therefore some knowl- 
edge of this subject is absolutely necessary for a correct 
understanding of our own English language. It give us a 
key to a quicker understanding of all that we read or hear. 
It is essential to all who are to continue the work in col- 
lege. It is helpful to every professional man. It will 
give us a greater appreciation of the Latin writers and 
speakers. It increases our general culture and contributes 
to our broader discipline. 

The course in Latin is required of all who receive a 
diploma. In special cases, to fit the student for college, 
equivalent subjects may be substituted. 

SCIENCE. 

The Academv is supplied with sufficient apparatus to 
be a valuable aid in the study of the natural sciences. In 
Physics the subject, is illustrated by many simple pieces 
of apparatus, besides the air-pump, electrical machine, 
batteries, etc. In chemistry students do practical work 
in the laboratory, which is supplied with necessary chem- 
icals and apparatus. Geology and Mineralogy are illus- 
trated by a collection of more than twelve hundred speci- 
mens, presented to the Academy by the Alumni. In 
'Zoology and Botany, animals and plants are studied from 
nature, and systems of classifications are made prominent. 
In all the sciences objects are used as much as possible. 
The following are the purposes in Science work : 
First— To interest the pupil in the observation of na- 
ture. 

Second— To develop the power of reasoning through 
the original investigation of the truths of nature. 

— 14 — 



Third — To give a practical knowledge of the elemen- 
tary principles of those sciences which are now, in a great 
measure, causing our rapid progress in the civilization of 
the world. 



NORMAL DEPARTMENT. 

For several years past special arrangements have been 
made to give those students desiring to teach, the oppor- 
tunity of normal instruction during the Spring term. A 
special normal instructor has been employed, and many 
students of this and adjoining counties have availed them- 
selves of this opportunity. 

The increasing demand for normal work and for a more 
extended course than can be given during the Sprinf ...iin, 
has induced the board to add a Normal Department that 
provides for a full year's work of three terms,, as follows: 



Fall Term. 


1st Grammar. 


1st Arithmetic. 


1st U. S. History 


Physiology. 


Winter Term. 


2d Grammar. 


2d Arithmetic. 


2d U. S. History. 


1st Geography. 


^Spring Term. 


Method. 


Reading. 


Psychology. 


2d Geography. 



*AII the common branches are offered in this term. 



In the Fall term, classes will be organized with the 
view of continuing the work throughout the year. Dur- 
ing the Winter term, those having started in the Fall will 
advance to the next work in the course. 

In the Spring term, classes will be provided for those 
beginning the Normal work, and for those who have done 

— 15 — 



one term's work. It is thus seen that all the legal branches, 
Psychology and Method, may be had in the Spring term. 

It is not the purpose of high schools to give students 
a teacher's knowledge of the legal branches. However, it 
is known that many high-school graduates desire to teach. 
This course of Normal work is especially fitted for this 
class of students, and for students having graduated from 
common schools who wish to get a more comprehensive 
knowledge of the legal branches, and learn correct meth- 
ods of teaching them. Psychology, Pedagogy and Method 
will be given to make work characteristically professional. 

In the Normal course it is not intended to conduct a 
scheme of cramming for examination, but it is our inten- 
tion to help teachers in their school quite as much as to 
aid them to get license. 

Work will be so arranged that students who desire to 
take part in academic work and part normal work will be 
accommodated. 



COURSE IN MUSIC. 

Vocal and instrumental music will be taught by an 
experienced teacher. 

In the beginning course students who have known 
nothing of music will be taught to read readily and sing 
ordinary church music. Advanced work will be giveu to 
prepare students to form and conduct chorus classes and to 
teach music in the Dublic schools. 

Excellent opportunity will be offered to all students 
who wish to take special courses in instrumental music. 

— :6 — 



GENERAL ITEMS. 



The government of the school is based upon the idea 
that manhood is more than scholarship; that self-respect 
and self-control on the part of a student are important 
factors in the formation of character. Greater stress is 
laid upon the thoroughness of instruction and accuracy of 
knowledge than upon rapidity of advancement. 

For many years the health of students has been uni- 
formly good. There is probably no better location in the 
State in this respect. 

The. Friends and Methodists both hold religious ser- 
vices on the Sabbath and each maintains a Sabbath school. 
Meetings of the Young People's Society of Christian En- 
deavor and the Epworth League are held every Sabbath 
evening, and students are welcomed to their meetings and 
membership. 

A sufficient number of teachers is constantly employed 
so that large classes may be avoided, and students may re- 
ceive personal attention during the recitation. 

Expenses are as low as at any other school affording 
equal advantages. 

The managers of the school are very careful to make 
this an institution in which students who are away from 
home and its restraints will be surrounded by good, moral 
influences, and in this they have the co-operation of the 
citizens of the village. There are no beer, liquor or bil- 
liard saloons in the village. 

No student whose influence is known to have a cor- 
rupting tendency will be retained in the school. 

— 17 — 



DIPLOMAS. 



Students whose conduct is exemplary, and who com- 
plete the course of study and prepare and deliver a suita- 
ble literary production, will be furnished a diploma, signed 
by the instructors and the President and Secretary of the 
Board of Trustees. To receive a diploma a student should 
be in attendance at the Academy one year, except when 
special arrangements are made with the Superintendent 
and Board of Trustees. 

LECTURES. 

Students have the opportunity to hear good lectures at 
small expense. Addresses on various subjects are given 
during the year by able speakers. 

Public exercises in declamation will be given by the 
First Tear class at the end of the Fall term. 

LITERARY EXERCISES. 
Literary exercises are required of all students in all 
grades, both in class work and before the public. Care is 
used that students may learn the art of composition and 
public delivery. Essays and declamations are a part of 
the regular school work. 

ORATORY AND ELOCUTION. 
There is an Oratorical Association which is associated 
with similar organizations of students of Fairmount, Cen- 
tral and Westfield Academies in the Inter- Academic Ora- 
torical Association of Indiana. In each school a contest 
is held in oratory and declamation. The successful con- 
testant in each department represents his school in an 
Inter-Academic contest held in May. 

— 18 — 



LIBRARIES. 

Four sets of encyclopedias are in the school rooms, 
and these, with the dictionaries and numerous reference 
books, are for the free use of all. There are three libra- 
ries in connection with the school, which comprise about 
three thousand volumes, two of them belonging to the Lit- 
erary Society, and the other to the Academy Association. 



TEXTS USED DURING THE YEAR. 



First Latin Collar and Daniell 

Classics Various Texts 

English Selections 

Rhetoric Kavana and Beatty 

English Literature Painter 

Algebra Wells 

Geometry Wentworch 

Physical Geography Davis 

Physics Gage 

Chemistry Cooley 

Astronomy Steel-Todd 

Botany Bailey 

Psychology Halleck 

English History Wrong 

Civics Fiske 

Political Economy Walker 

U. S. History Channing 

Grammar Wisely 

Physiology Macy and Norris 

Ancient History West 

Modern History 

American Literature Painter 

Grammar Latin Bennett 

Caesar Bennett 

Cicero ..Bennett 

Virizil Bennett 



— 1Q — 



EXPENSES. 

RATES OF TUITION. 

Grammar School, four studies 75 cents per week. 

First Year Academic, for each study 20 " " 

Second Year Academic, " -1% " " 

Junior Year Academic, " 22J4 " " 

Senior Year Academic, " 25 " " 

Normal Classes, " 25 " " 

Students who enter at irregular times Will be charged full 
tuition for the term in case they complete the term's work 
in such manner as to receive credit toward the diploma. 

Normal students and others who do not expect to earn 
credit in the regular course will be charged only for the 
time of actual enrollment in the classes. 

Occasionally those who are especially strong are per- 
mitted to earn credits by outside study under the super- 
vision of the teachers. For such credits as these one-half 
the regular tuition will be charged. 

Tuition is due at the opening of each term, and set- 
tlement should be made with the Superintendent or the 
Treasurer of the Board of Trustees. Sudents will receive 
no credit for their work until the tuition is paid. 

BOARDING. 

The citizens of Spiceland have always given the stu- 
dents a hearty welcome by receiving them into their homes. 
"The cost of boarding and rooms in private families where 
everything is furnished can be had for $2.00 to $3.00 a 
week. Rooms, both furnished and unfurnished, can be 
had from 25 to 50 cents a week, and table board of excel- 
lent quality at the rate of $1.50 to $2.00 for the full week. 

Thus persons who may live near enough to go home at 
the end of each week and who wish to economize, may re- 
duce the cost of living to a very small sum. 



— 20 — 



LIST OF STUDENTS. 



SENIORS. 

Anderson, Elsie Reece, Jessie 

Brandy, Walter Reeves, Ruby 

Duke, Raymond Reeves, Anna 

Gano, Alexander Reeves, Eva 

Griffin, Oran Rifner, Arthur 

Gardener, Ruth Shipman, Roy 

Kennard, Elva Stubbs, Arden 

Lane, Aura Test, Everett 

Patterson, Sadie Thomas, Amy 

Pope, Edward Wilson, Paul 

Elliott, Susie 

JUNIORS. 

Bundy, Charles Hudelson, Arthur 

' Bundy, Walter Nugen, Frances 

^-Carter, Eber Painter, Myron 

f Emminger, Jessie Simmons, Maude 

Hudelson, Hazel Wilson, Lowell- — • 

Wright, Orville 

SOPHOMORES. 

Bell, Irene Painter, Levinus 

Carmichael, Lulu Redic, Vida 

Gordon, Edna Stubbs, George 

Harvey, Everett Wilson, Daniel 

Mills, Olive Woodard, Floyd 

Wright, Miriam 



— 21 — 



FRESHMEN. 



Allison, Horace 
Beach, Agues 
Brown, Paul 
Chandler, Ethel 
Darling, Charlie 
Daugherty, John 
De^on, Loma 
Duke, Estella 
English, Leslie 
Fields, Ada 
Greenstreet. 



Hardy, Madge 



Land, Elba 
McClain, Clifford 
Matthews, Mabel 
Moore, Fred 
Ramsdell, Jesse 
Seaford, Mary 
Sidwell, Bessie 
Stewart, Carl 
Vandenbark, Hazel 
"Wales, Ada 

Williams, Hansel 

Wilson, Lucile 
Haisley, Claude 



IRREGULAR. 

Basey, Lonia Jones, Barton 

English, Fred- Lane, Roena 



Griffin, James 
Griffin, Harry 
Thomas, Pearl 



Matthews, Clifford 
Place, Ida 
Scovell, Macey 

NORMAL^ 



Bridges, Lawrence 
Cooper, \Sylvia 
Hoover, Claire 
Hoover, Olivan 
Harris, Mabel 
Peckenpaugh, Hettie 
Peckenpaugh, Grace 
Richey, Lee 



Rifner, Etta 
Rockhill, Howard 
Rogers, Edgar 
Shaffer, Otis 
Shiveley, James 
Veach, Charles 
Williams, Ethel 
Wright, Ethel 



Rifner, Ethel 



ALUMNI. 



1S70 

*Eli U. Cook . _ 

John J. Stubbs Omaha, Neb 

1871 

*Walter D. Jones : 

*Alvin H. Jenkins 

*I. Macy Good 

C. R. Dixon Lawrence, Kan 

R. G. Boone Yonkers, N Y 

Dallas Sisson Spiceland 

Mary Ballenger ( Barnard) New Castle 

Louisa WicKersham Lewisville, RFDi 

Lida Edwards (Saint) New Castle 

1872 

Lindley H. Johnson Dunreith 

*David Henley 

*Jacob Hill 

Henry W. Painter New Castle, R F D 1 

Robert G. Mitchell Pacific Grove, Cal 

1873 

*Sadie D. Talbert (Wright; 

Aaron B. Bell Springtown, Ark 

*J. Tilman Hutchins 

John Pennington Cincinnati, O 

Mary Stubbs (Painter) New Castle, R F D 1 

Nathan Williams Oswego, Kan 

Carrie Talbert (Newby) Wichita, Kan 

1874 

Alice Coffin (Russell) St. Louis 

Elvira Spencer (Harold) Indianapols 



"Deceased. 



— 23 — 



J. P. Edwards ... Anderson 

William S. Moffit t Kennard 

Edwin 0. Kennard Pasadena, Cal 

Nathan Rosenberger Muscatine, Iowa 

W. E. Jackson Knightstown 

D. C. Mitchell Spiceland 

1875 

W. W. Gregg Spiceland 

William Pidgeon Bloomington 

Irvin Stanley Westfield 

1877 

Milton Roberts... , Lynneville, Iowa 

1878 

S. Ella Bogue (Dogget) Danville, Va 

Belle Chambers (Estesj New Castle 

J. Pinkney Mitchell Fresno, Cal 

Thomas Mitchell... Knightstown 

Flora Moore (Brady; Indianapolis 

John O. Reed Ann Arbor, Mich 

♦William S. Seaford r 

Fannie Thornburg (Parsons) Oak Park, 111 

1879 

J. A. Buck Muncie 

Carrie Goodwin (Jeffrey) New Castle 

Thomas Newiin Guilford, N C 

1880 

J. Edgar Cloud Chicago 

Wm. N. Lamb San Francisco, Cal 

Mattie Lamb Outland Amboy 

Ada Grace Murphy Chattanooga, Tenn 

Ida May Roberts •. Metamoras, Mexico 

Emma Belle Roberts Westfield 



-Deceased. 

— 24 — 



Frank Symons Portland, Me 

Lamira Trueblood (Kellum) Friendswood 

1881 

Oscar R. Baker Winchester 

*Corrie Bogue 

Minnie Benedict (Blankenship ) Paragon 

Carrie Unthank (Kellum) Indianapolis' 

*Jessie Stratton 

• 1882 

*Arthur H. Baily 

J. Newton Barnard Middletown 

Harriet Bogue (Newiin) Irvington 

Hattie E. Dickinson . Spiceland 

Charles Newiin Irvington 

1883 

Anna Hudelson (Foster) Washington.. D C 

Ryland Ratliff Danville 

Julia Stafford (Newby) New Castle, R F D 2 

Emily Weeks Mechanicsburg 

1884 

*Cora Kirk 

Ella Stratton (Hodson) New Castle, R F D 4 

Virginia Griffin (Cory) Dunreith 

Isadore Hall (Wilson) Spiceland 

William Julian Hastings, Neb 

Charles Newby Converse 

1885 

Mary L. Brown (Pennington) Spiceland 

Alfred Y. King Mt. Vernon, 111 

Oliver C. Steele .Spiceland 



Deceased. 



- 25 — 



1 886 



L. Winnie Bailey (Clement) Haddenfield, N J 

Mattie E. Brown Daytona, Fla 

Richard Broadbent Elwood 

Elbert Griffin Elwood 

Alonzo C. Hodson New Castle, R F D 4 

*Johu L. McNew 

1887 

Herbert T. Baily Spiceland 

Clarence H. Beard Xew Castle 

Anna K. Bogue (Shaffer) Benton Harbor, Mich 

Lindley Compton Tomah, Wis 

Elizabeth S. Hiatt (Genauj Crete, Neb 

Abram Miller Woodstock, Canada 

Bert Smith Zionsville 

1S8S 

Rhoda Ballenger (Cunningham) Indianapolis 

Hannah Brown (Stribbing) Payton, Iowa 

Oryntha Brown (Jester) Payton, Iowa 

*Jessie Butler 

Clara G. Edwards (Knight) St. Louis, Mo 

John C. Cook New Castle, R F D 2 

Elva Elliott 'Comptoni Tomah, Wis 

Achsah E. Ratcliff New Castle 

H. H. Rayl , ... Muncie 

Charles Stubbs Kentland 

J. A. Greenstreet Richmond 

H. H. Ratcliff Spiceland 

1889 

Laura Benedict . Indianapolis 

Blanch Braddock (McNew) Greenfield 

Frank Copelar.d Dunreith 

Estella Deem -'Kennedy; Thorntown 

Lawrence Gardner Kniijhtstown 



-Deceased. 

— 26 — 



Gertrude Gordon (Genaux) L'tica, O 

Sue Griffin (Evans) Spiceland 

Otis Stubbs Lewisville, R F D 

Mary White . Pasadena, Cai 

1890 

L. Etta Butler ......Lewisville, R F D 

Elmer Deem Burlington 

Edwin B. Ratcliff Spiceland 

Bennie Stratton New Castle, R F D 1 

S. E. Stubbs Wilkinson 

1891 

Ethel M. Copeland (Lee) Meadville, Pa 

Louie Edmunson (Poe) Knightstown 

Maurine Gardner (Kern) Cadiz 

Charles N. Hardy Markleville 

Alice Hiatt (Copeland) Sabina, O 

Ernest Sisson Maxwell 

Alfred H. Symons North Manchester 

Mary M. Teas Centervi'ie 

Charles Titus Warrington 

Herbert D. Woodard Fountain City 

1892 

Jesse S. Baily Silverton, Co) 

Clara Brown Spiceland 

Warren T. Evans Canby, Minn 

John B. Greenstreet Lewisviile, R F D 

Winnie Hinshaw (Milligan) Winchester 

David M. Kemp Kempton 

Alice Lawrence Spiceland 

Estella Symons Minneapolis, Minn 

Alvin Ulrich Greensboro 

1893 

Oscar Bogue Spiceland 

Estella Charles Indianapolis 

Floy Hill Pasadena, Cai 



— 27 — 



Arthur Holloway Oskaloosa, Iowa 

Leorajessup (Parker) Westland 

John Miller New Castle 

Olen Payne New Castle 

Lena Rayl Spiceland 

George Smith Knightstown 

Orville White i Galena, Kan 

1894 

Minnie Black (Moore) Chicago, 111 

Bessie I. Brown Daytona, Fla 

Clarence V. Hall New Castle 

Horace Hardy Markleville 

Ida Holloway (Kenworthy) Richmond 

Arlie Hood New Castle 

Bertha Jessup Clay Center, Neb 

Elmer Lawrence Spiceland 

Maud M. Shaffer (Payne) New Castle 

Frank Pitts Indianapolis 

Oscar F. Symons Minneapolis, Minn 

189? 

Clarence Painter . Terre Haute 

Mabel Wright (Garr) Kokomo 

Edgar Cox... Clarkton, N C 

♦Nellie Ratliff 

Howard Henley Tuttle, I T 

Maud Wildman (Evans) . Philadelphia, Pa 

Frank Hudelson Mavs 

Pearl Moffett (Wood) Greensboro 

1896 

Cora Hudson (Bogue) Spiceland 

Clara White (Wildman) I Selina, O 

Elsie Hudelson Greenfield 

Anna Morris Lincolnville 

Pearl M.James (Tweedy) ...Wabash 



'"Deceased. 



— 28 — 



Mabel Newby (Hood) New Castle 

W. J. Carson Chicago 

Nora Griffin (Beach El wood 

Theresa Wildman Philadelphia, Pa 

Rosco Edwards Snyder 

1897 

Leoti Applegate (Coffin) Spiceland 

Elva M. Hudson (Hall) Spiceland 

Lois M. Henley .- Indianapolis 

Fanny Hayes Dunreith 

Floy Hudelson Greenfield 

josie B. Harlan (Weatherman) Dana 

Jessie Leaky (Hiatt) Spiceland R F D 

Pearl Millikan (Hardy) Markleville 

Ethel Rifner Spiceland 

Mayme Stafford (Applegate) Spiceland 

Clyde Sisson Spiceland 

Minnie Stratton (Stafford; New Castle, R F D 1 

Charles Smith Washington, D C 

Irving White ' Lewisville 

1898 

Clifford Applegate Spiceland 

Jarr.es Holtsciaw Spiceland 

Bavis Nay Springport 

Emory Ratcliff Plainfield 

Gertrude Seaford Spiceland 

Pearl Symons Spiceland 

Lelia Smith Spiceland 

Charles A. Beard New York, N Y 

Merritt Stafford New Castle, R F D 2 

Cora Smith Spiceland 

Walter Painter Damascus, O 

Bertha Charles . Harlem, Mont 

Ernest Shockley Straughn 

Elsie Shockley (Lockridge).- Peru 



— 29 — 



ISQ9 

Bessie Haisley Spiceland 

Bertha O. Lawrence Spiceland 

Florence O. Macy . Lewisville, R F D 

Earl Moffett Knightstown, R F D 2 

Walter T. Pearce New Castle, R F D 2 

Orabell Shaffer New Castle^ R F D 2 

1900 

Ethel Applegate * Spiceland 

Edgar Bazzle Muncie 

Susan Benedict (Nay) Springport 

Cora Cnarles (Carson) Logansport 

Connie Griffin Alexandria 

David W. Gordon Indianapolis 

Guy H. Hall New Lisbon 

Clyde Kennedy . .Richmond 

Clarence Macy Lewisville, R F D 

Everest Macy Lewisville, R F D 

Carroll Mills Lewisville, R F D 

Cecil Newby Englewood, Kan 

*Jeanette Ritner 

Pernia Thornburg (Griffin) Carthage 

John R. Thompson Sulphur Springs 

1901 

Ira E. Bell Spiceland 

Bertha E. Butler Spiceland 

Raymond Byrket Elwood 

Jennie Compton. Spiceland 

Everett Cope Lewisville 

■Deborah Edwards Snyder 

Ethel Edwards Snyder 

Lillian H. Hayes Dunreith 

Walter B.Harvey Dunreith 

Tohn R. Hinshaw Greensboro 

Everett Macy... .Lewisville, R F D 



! 'Deceased. 



Georgia Millikan Spiceland 

Jennie E. Millikan . Spiceland 

Homer E. Nugen .... Lewisville 

Cora E. Risk Spiceland 

Robert A. Roberts Bloomington 

Grace E. Stewart (Johnson) Greenfield 

Russell L. Wright Greensboro 

Walter C. Wilson Minsdoka, Idaho 

1902 

Harley Anderson New Castle, R F D I 

Jessie Baily Union City, Tenn 

Mary Butler Spiceland 

Walter Byers Knightstown, R F D 2 

Jennie Kirk Spiceland 

Gurney Maple Lewisville 

Manning Smith Mt. Summit 

Rena Thomas i.. Fountain City 

Retta Thomas Fountain City 

Russell Wilson . Terre Haute 

India Yost (Cook) Sulphur Springs 

1903 

Rilla Bartlett... 1 Lewisville 

Nellie Beckett Spiceland 

Perrin Holt Greensboro 

Arthur Johnson Dunreith 

Carl Newby Englewood, Kan 

Rupert Redic Knightstown. R F D 

Ralph Stubbs Spiceland 

Walter Wright Greensboro 

,* I9°4 

Elsie Bell Spiceland 

Josephine Beeson Knightstown 

Will Benedict 1 Mt. Summit 

Lawrence Bridges . Markleville 

Warren Edwards Snyder 



lrl Evans ■_ Mt. Summit 

Jessie Gordon Spiceland 

Ruth Harvey Dunreith 

Hazel Heacock (Yockey) Richmond 

Homer Henley Spiceland 

Claire Hoover . Spiceland 

Barton Jones ' Spiceland 

Belva Jordon Lynn 

Guy May Wilkinson 

Pansy Newby Lewisyille 

Anna Painter New Castle, R F D 

Clara Patterson New Castle, R F D 

Lois Pitts ~ Morristown, R F D 

Wendell Pitts Morristown, R F D 

Lawrence Reeves Markleville 

Robert Reeves Wilkinson 

Etta Rifner Spiceland 

John Rogers Mooreland 

Herbert Seaford _ Spiceland 

Ralph Silver Knightstown 

Bernetha Smith Spiceland 

Charles Veach Mt. Summit 

Ethel Wright Dunreith 

Harold Yockey ...Richmond 




KNIOHTSTOWN BAMNER PRINT. 



71 




1905-1906 



SPICELAND 
ACADEMY AND NORMAL 
SCHOOL 



SPICELAND, INDIANA 



Faculty and calendar 

For the Academic Year 1906-1907 



INSTRUCTORS 

Homer H. Cooper, A. M., Superintendent 
History and Science 

Ethel I'earson, u. S. 
Mathematics and Normal 

Emma Kendall, A. B. 
Latin and English 

•Kkkd E. Smi.Th, D. D, 
Bible Study 

Helen Gakvin 

Music 

NEI.I.IIC API'LEGATE 

■Elocution and Oratory 



CALENDAR 

J 906 

Fall Term begins Tuesday, September 25. 
Fall Term ends Friday, December 21. 

J 907 

Winter Term begins Tuesday, January I. 
Winter Term ends Friday, March 15. 
Spring Term begins Tuesday, March 26. 
Commencement, Friday, June 14. 



BOARD OF TRUSTEES 



Chari.es B. Harvey, President 
Ekfie A. Hall, Secretary 
JESSE Bicll, Treasurer 
Oscar H. Bogue 
Harriett E. Dickinson 
Alvin Painter 



INSTRUCTORS 

For Academic Year 1905-1906 



Homer H. Cooper, A. M„ Superintendent 
History and Science 

William A. Austin 
Mathematics and Normal 

Emma Kendall, A. B. 
Latin anil English 

Edwin B. Ratcliff 
Normal 

Helen Garvin 
Music 

7,_Nellie Applegate 
\ Elocution and Oratory 

— 6 — 



SPICELAND ACADEMY. 



HISTORY. 

PICELAND ACADEMY is the oldest academy*" 
charge of the Friends in Indiana. It was char- 
tered as an academy in 1S70, but its history as a 
Friends' school extends over a period of seventy 
years. It is under the control of the Spiceland Monthly 
Meeting, by which body the Board of Trustees is appointed. 
The teachers are selected by the Trustees. While the 
school is under denominational control, it is not sectarian 
in the least; its foundation rests upon Christian culture; 
it has been kept under strong Christian influences, and its 
purpose it to develop practical, earnest, and active Chris- 
tian manhood and womanhood. 

The first class graduated in 1S70. The Alumni 
Association now enrolls about three hundred members. 
About three thousand five hundred students have received 
instruction in the school since its organization as an 
academy. 

LOCATION. 

Spiceland Academy is located in the beautiful town of 
Spiceland, Indiana, in the southern part of Henry county, 
on the Lake Erie and Western railroad, two miles north of 
Dunreith, on the Pennsylvania railroad. The buildings 
are situated in the midst of a beautiful grove, adjoining 
which is a large campus, well adapted to athletic sports. 

The interurban street-car line gives connections with 
surrounding cities. 




ENTRANCE. 



Students may enter at any time, but students coining 
from other schools are required to bring certificates staling 
their literary and moral standing. In the absence of ap- 
proved certificate, examinations will be held and students 
classified accordingly. Classes in Grammar School brandies 
are maintained as demand may justify, affording opportu- 
nity for preparatory work to students who may not be 
eligible to regular academic standing. 

The conditions for admission to the First Year class 
are the same as for entrance to the public high schools of 
this state. 

In general, graduates from non-commissioned high 
schools of this county can enter the Academy with credit 
for the number of months' work he has studied in his home 
school wherein the work is up to the standard of the com- 
missioned high school. 

COURSE OF STUDY 

The Academy course of study has been arranged with 
two purposes in view: 

First — It is prepared to conform to the needs and de- 
sires of all students who ma}- not have the opportunity to 
pursue a college course, but who desire a practical educa- 
tion which will prepare them to lead an active and success- 
ful life. 

Second — It is arranged to enable students to make the 
necessary preparation for admission in college without 
examination. 



A FOUR YEARS' COURSE. 

For three reasons the course of study has been increased 
to a four years' course. 

1. To increase the advantages of Spicelaud Academy 
as a finishing school for those who will not be aide to pur- 
sue their work in college. 

2. To give tlie pupil a more thorough preparation for 
any college in the United States. 

3. To keep thoroughly up to the very best standard 
of the educational thought of the day. 

THE COURSE IX THREE YEARS. 

The course of study is so arranged that any pupil who 
may wish to complete the course in three years may do so 
by earnest and faithful work. 

Special opportunity will be given those who wish to take 
advantage of this offer and thus save time and expense. 

THE ENGLISH COURSE. 

The completion of the English Course will entitle one 
to a certificate of credit. It is intended for those who have 
no expectation of attending college but who wish to be as 
well prepared as possible for their work in life. 

It is to be understood that the Latin Course is the one 
required for college entrance requirements. 

HIHLE STUDY. 

The study of the Bible is considered of so much import- 
ance that arrangements have been made by which it will be 
taught in the Academy. The subject will be made an 
elective one. Credit will be given as in other studies. This 
will be one of the most valuable studies in the course and it 
is hoped many will take advantage of the work. 

Fred E. Smith has been placed in charge of the work. 



— 9 — 



OUTLINE OF COURSE OF STUDY 



LATIN COURSE 



Latin ( Beginning) 
Algelira 

Ancient History 
Composition and Literature 



FIRST YEAR 

HIKKT KBMKgTBlt 



ENOI-ISH COUHSE 



Latin ( Beginning 
Algebra 

Ancient 1 Hstory 
Composition and 



Cfesar 
Algebra 
Modern History 
Rhetoric and Literature 
'Arithmetic 
•Bible Study 

Ciesar 

Plane Geometry 
Rhetoric and Literature 
Modern History 
♦Physical Geography 
•Bible Study 



Cicero 

Plane Geometry 
American Literature 
*English History 
•Botany 
•Bible Study 

Cicero 

Solid Geometry 
American Literature 
•English History 
•Botany 
"Bible Study 

Virgil 

English Literature 
♦United States History 
Physics 

•Political Economy 
•Bible Study 

Elective 

English Literature 
•Civics 
Physics 
•Business Law 
"Bible Study 



Literature 

SECOND V EAR 

MUST NlCMK.sTKK 

Arithmetic 

i 



( rrannnar 
Algebra 

Ancient History 
Composition and Literature 

Physiology 
Algebra 

Ancient 1 1 istory 
Composition and Literature 



Algebra 
Modern History 
Rhetoric and Literature 



AKCOND BKMKRTKn 



Physical Geography 
Plane Geometry 
Rhetoric and Literature 
Modem History 



JUNIOR 

K I It ST BRMXRTB1I 



Botany 

Plane < Jeometry 
American Literature 
Enidisli History 



BKCOXD SEMKsTF-H 



Botany 
Solid Geometry 
American Literature 
English History 



SENIOR 

f'l UST SE M FHTBR 



Physics 

English Literature 
United States History 
Geography 



RECOXD SEMKHTKB 



English Literature 
Civics 
Physics 
•Business Law 



— 10 



'Elective 



Advanced classes in any of the lines of study will be 
formed whenever a sufficient number of pupils desire the 
higher work. The diploma of the Academy will admit the 
student to any of the colleges of Indiana or of other States 
without entrance examinations. 

Higher classes in any subject or classes in subjects not 
offered will he formed whenever there is sufficient demand, 
and tuition will be charged at the same rate as for a fourth 
year study. Satisfactory work in these studies may be 
substituted for work in regular course, at the discretion 
of the Superintendent. 

The course of study makes provision for a number of 
eleetives, thus giving the student an opportunity to select 
work along the line of his preference. The thirty-two 
credits required for graduation are distributed among the 
departments as follows: Latin, seven; English, eight; 
History, two; Mathematics, six; Science, two; Eleetives,- 
seven . 

It is especially urged that al! pupils take the reglar 
Latin course of study, and after graduation attend college 
if possible. 

Increased advantages are offered in the arrangements 
made to take elective work in the following departments: 
Normal, Music, and Elocution and Orator}'. 

ENGLISH. 

The course in English is made thorough and practical. 
All the college entrance requirements are studied. Special 
attention is given to Grammar and Composition leading to 
Rhetoric. English and American Literature receive careful 
attention. The effort is made to rouse a real interest in the 



— ii — 



literature for its own sake and to increase the culture of the 
student by developing a love for the best in thought and 
style. 

HISTORY. 

The course in History is now arranged to conform to 
the recommendations of the Committee of Seven of the 
American Historical Association. 

besides the culture value of history, it is to be remem- 
bered that it is the stud)' which furnishes the student the 
ideals of character which lead to the highest moral growth. 
The student should thoroughly understand the institu- 
tional life of the people studied. 

The purposes of history in the Academy are as follows: 

First — The development of moral character. History 
as the study of institutional life and of character teaches 
us to watch tlie progress of humanity in the rise and fall 
of nations. Success or failure in national life or in the 
life of a person will cause us to adopt for ourselves and 
our country that which has proven of excellent worth. 
Historv helps us to avoid the mistakes of other people and 
nations. 

Second — The teaching of patriotism and the broaden- 
ing of our interests ami sympathies. While we wish to he- 
familiar with our own government and national character 
we must recognize the broad principle of the universal 
brotherhood of men. 

Third — The development of our powers of judgment. 
It is here that we especially study the relation between 
cause and effect. Kvery statesman has been a student of 
history. In studying the problems of life which have con- 



fronted other people we are greatly aided in the practical 
solution of the life problems of to-day. 

Fourth — The acquirement of useful facts. This, 
though generally considered of the most importance, is in 
fact but a subordinate purpose in the study of history. 

Fifth — The gaining of a broad and practical general 
culture. The work consists of a study of Ancient History 
in the first year; a special study of Medieval and Modern 
History in the second year; of English History in the third 
year; U. S. Historv and Civil Government in the fourth 
year. 

MATHEMATICS. 

The ai.m in this study is to introduce the student to 
mathematical methods and develop in him the power to 
reason clearly and accurately on any given problem. Alge-' 
bra is studied throughout the first year of the High School 
and the first hrlf of the second year; Geometry during the 
last half of the second year and through the third year. 
A great deal of supplementary work is given in Algebra, 
and original exercises are introduced as much as possible in 
Geometry. Astronomy is studied during the winter of the 
third year. In this subject the work is largely descriptive. 

A good six-inch telescope belongs to the Academy. 

LATIN. 

There is no subject in the Academy which has greater 
disciplinary value to the pupil than the study of Latin. It 
trains and strengthens the memory, cultivates and quickens 
the perception, and develops habits of ready, accurate, and 
sound thinking. 



A very large per cent, of all the words used in the 
dictionary will be of Latin origin, therefore some knowl- 
edge of this subject is absolutely necessary for a correct 
understanding of our own English language. It gives us a 
key to a quicker understanding of all that we read or hear. 
It is essential to all who are to continue the work in col- 
lege. It is helpful to every professional man. It will give 
us a greater appreciation of the Latin writers and speakers. 
It increases our general culture and contributes to our 
broader discipline. ' 

' ' The course in Latin is required of all who receive a 
diploma. In special cases, to lit the student for college, 
equivalent subjects may be substituted. 

SCIENCE. 

The Academy is supplied with sufficient apparatus to 
be a valuable aid in the study of the natural sciences. In 
Physics the subject is illustrated by many simple pieces of 
apparatus, besides the air pump, electrical machine, bat- 
teries; etc. In chemistry students do practical work in the 
laboratory, which is supplied with necessary chemicals and 
apparatus. Geology and Mineralogy are illustrated by a 
collection of more than twelve hundred specimens, pre- 
sented to the Academy by the Alumni. In Zoology and 
Botany, animals and plants are studied from nature, and 
systems of classifications are made prominent. In all the 
sciences objects are used as much as possible. 

The following are the purposes in Science work: 
First — To interest the pupil in the observation of na- 
ture. 

Second — To develop the power of reasoning through 
the original investigation of the truths of nature. 1 



Third — To give a practical knowledge of the elemen- 
tary principles of those sciences which are now, in a great 
measure, causing our rapid progress in the civilization of 
the world. 



I NORMAL DEPARTMENT 

For several yeans past special arrangements have been 
made to give those students desiring to teach, the oppor- 
tunity of normal instruction during the Spring term. A 
special normal instructor has been employed, and many 
students of this and adjoining counties have availed them- 
selves of this opportunity. 

The increasing demand for normal work and for a more- 
extended course than can be given during the Spring term, 
has induced the board to add a Normal Department that 
provides for a full year's work of three terms, as follows: 



Fall Term. 
Winter Term. 
^Spriii;; Term. 


ist Grammar 


ist Arithmetic 


ist ('. S. History 1 Physiology 


zd Grammar 
Method 


2(1 Arithmetic 
Keading 


2d 17. S. History ist Geography 
Psychology i 2d Geography 



* A 1 1 the common branches arc offered in this term. 



In the Fall term, classes will be organized with the 
view of continuing the work throughout the year. Dur- 
ing the Winter term, those having started in the Fall will 
advance to the next work in the course. 

In the Spring term, classes will be provided for those 
beginning the Normal work, and for those who have done 




one term's work. It is thus seen that all the legal branches, 
Psychology and Method, may be had in the spring term. 

It is not the purpose of high schools to give students 
a teacher's knowledge of the legal branches. However, it 
is known that many high-school graduates desire to teach. 
This course of Normal work is especially fitted for this 
class of students, and for students having graduated from 
common schools who wish to get a more comprehensive 
knowledge of the legal branches, and learn correct meth- 
ods of teaching them. Psychology, Pedagogy and Method 
will be given to make work characteristically professional. 

In the Normal course it is not intended to conduct 
a scheme of cramming for examination, but it is our inten- 
tion to help teachers in their school quite as much as to aid 
them to get license'. 

Work will be so arranged that students who desire to 
lake part in academic work and part normal work w ill be- 
am Hinnodated. 



COURSE IN MUSIC. 

Vocal and instrumental music will be taught by an ex- 
perienced teacher. 

In the beginning course students who have known 
nothing of music will be taught to read readily and sing 
ordinary church music. Advanced work will be given to 
prepare students to form and conduct chorus classes and to 
teach music in the public schools. 

Excellent opportunity will be offered to all students 
who wish to take special courses in instrumental music. 



GENERAL ITEMS. 



The government of the school is based upon the idea 
that manhood is more than scholarship; that self-respect 
and self-control on the part of a student are important 
factors in the formation of character. Greater stress is laid 
upon the thoroughness of instruction and accuracy of 
knowledge than upon rapidity of advancement. 

For main - years the health of students has been uni- 
formh good. There is probably no better location in the 
State in this respect. 

The Friends and Methodists both hold religious ser- 
vices on the Sabbath and each maintains a Sabbath school. 
Meetings of the Young People's Society of Christian En- 
deavor and the Epworlh League are held every Sabbath 
evening, and students are welcome to their meetings and 
membership'. 

A sufficient number of teachers is constantly employed 
so that large classes may be avoided, and students may re- 
ceive personal attention during the recitation. 

Expenses are as low as at any other school affording 
equal advantages. 

The managers of the school are very careful to make 
this an institution in which students who are away from 
home and its restraints will be surrounded by good, moral 
influences, and in this they have the co-operation of the 
citizens of the village. There are no beer, liquor or bil- 
liard saloons in the village. 

No student whose influence is known to have a cor- 
rupting tendency will be retained in the school. 



DIPLOMAS 

Students whose conduct is exemplary, and who com- 
plete the course of study and prepare and deliver a suitable 
literary production, will be furnished a diploma, signed 
by the instructors and the President and Secretary of the 
Hoard of Trustees. To receive a diploma a student should 
be in attendance at the Academy one year, except when 
special arrangements are made with the Superintendent 
and Board of Trustees. j 

LECTURES. 

Students have the opportunity to hear good lectures at 
small expense. Addresses on various subjects are given 
during the year by able speakers. 

Public exercises in declamation will be given by the 
First Year class at the end of the Fall term. 

LITERARY EXERCISES 

Literar_\' exercises are required of all students in all 
grades, both in class work and before the public. Care is 
used that students may learn the art of composition and 
public delivery. Essays and declamations are a part of 
the regular school work. 

ORATORY AND ELOCUTION . 

There is an Oratorical Association which is associated 
with similar organizations of students of Fainnount, Cen- 
tral and West field Academies in the Inter- Academic Ora- 
torical Association of Indiana. In each school a contest is 
held in oratory and declamation. The successful contest- 
ant in each department^ represents his school in an Inter- 
Academic contest held in May. 

— 1 8 — 



LIBRARIES 



Four sets of encyclopedias are in the school rooms, 
and these, with the dictionaries and numerous reference 
books, are for the free use of all. There is a large library 
in connection with the school, which comprise about three 
thousand volumes. 



TEXTS USED DURING THE YEAR. 



First Latin Collar and Daniell 

Classics Various Texts 

English Selections 

Rhetoric Kavana and Beatty 

English Literature Newcomer 

Algebra Wells 

Geometry Wentworlh 

Physical Geography Davis 

Physics Gage 

Chemistry Cooley 

Astronomy Steel-Todd 

Botany : Bailey 

Psychology Halleck 

English History Wrong 

Civics Fiske 

Political Economy Walker 

U. S. History Channing 

Grammar Wisely 

Physiology Mac)' and Norris 

Ancient History West 

Modern History Myers 

American Literature Painter 

Grammar Latin Bennett 

Ctesar ; Bennett 

Cicero Bennett 

Virgil Bennett 

— 19 — 



EXPENSES. 



RATES OF TUITION. 

Academic classes for each study $1.00 per month 

two or more studies.. 2.00 per month 
Normal classes for each study 1.00 per mouth 

Students who enter at irregular times will be charged 
full tuition for the term in qrase they complete the term's 
work in such manner as to receive credit toward the diploma. 

Normal students and others who do not expect to earn 
credit in the regular course will be charged only for tire 
time of actual enrollment in the classes. 

Occasionally those who are especially strong are per- 
mitted to earn credits by outside study under the supervis- 
ion of the teachers. For such credits as these one-half the 
regular tuition will be charged. 

Tuition is due at the opening of each term, and settle- 
ment should be made with the Superintendent or the 
Treasurer of the Hoard of Trustees. Students will receive 
no credit for their work until the tuition is paid. 

BOARDING. 

The citizens of Spiceland have always given the stu- 
dents a hearty welcome by receiving them into their homes. 
The cost of boarding and rooms in private families where 
everything is furnished can be had for S2.00 to S3. 00 a 
week. Rooms, both furnished and unfurnished, can be 
had from 25 to 50 cents a week, and table board of excel- 
lent quality at the rate of $1.50 to $2.00 for the full week. 

Thus persons who may live near enough to go home at 
the end of each week and who wish to economize, may re- 
duce the cost of living to a very small sum. 

— 20 — 



LIST OF STUDENTS. 



Bundy, Charles 
Bundy, Walter 
Hudelson, Arthur 
Hudelson, Hazel 
Kellar, Kdna 
Nugen, Frances 



Bartlett, Hazel 
Bell, Irene 
Cleaver, Allen 
McDaniel, Ruby 
Painter, Levinus 



Allison, Horace 
beach, Agnes 
brown, Paul 
bowers, bertha 
Chandler, Ethel 
Dougherty, John 
Delon, Loma 
English, Leslie 
Fields, Ada 
Haisley, Claude 
Hardy, Madge 
Ken nn.nl, Fverett 



SICNK IRS. 

Painter, Myron 
Rogers, Edgar 
Shaffer, Otis 
Simmons, Maud 
Van Dine. Grover 
Wright, Orville 

JUNIORS. 

Redio, Vicla 
Reeves, Leetha 
Williams, Hassel 
Wilson, Daniel 
Woodward, Floyd 

SOPHOMORES. 

Kirkham, Glenn 
Land, Elba 
McClain, Clifford 
Matthews, Mabel 
May, Ethel 
Moore, Fred 
Seaford, Mary 
Sidwell, Bessie 
Stewart, Carl 
Stanley, bertha 
Wales, Ada 
Wilson, Lucile 



FRESHMEN. 



Arnold, Beula 
Bowen, Violet 
Butler, Loren 
Cooper, Minnie 
Delon, Elbert 
Fields, Hazel 
Hays, Walter 
Heacock, Hattie 
Hndelson, Ruth 
MeGrady, James 
Mellinger, Myrtle 



Bitner, Alva 
Gordon, Edna 
Harris, Mabel 
Rich, Clarence 
Scovell, Maeey 



Anderson, Elsie 
Cleaver, Marie 
Holliday, Perry 



Modlin, John 
Moffitt, Griffin 
Pennington, Elgar 
Reeves, Lynn 
Sinnnons, Minnie 
Smith, Margaret 
Taylor, Willie 
Wilkinson, Vaughn 
Williams, Ross 
Wilson, Perry 
Wright, Nettie 

IRREGULAR. 

Smiley. Gertrude 
Stubbs, George 
Stubbs, Arden 
Thomas, Murray 
Warwick, Frank 

NORMAL. 

Lyons, Nellie 

Peck en pa u °;1 ) . G race 

Wilson, Paid 



— 22 — 



ALUMNI. 



OFFICERS 
1906-J907 

President Dallas Sisson 

Vice-President Lindley Johnson 

Secretary Corn Smith 

■r Susan Evans 

Executive Committee ■< Maude S. Payne 

v O. C. Steele 

Orator Jno. O. Recti 

Vice-Orator Win. S. Moffitt 

Historian Mary Teas 

Vice-Historian II. \V. Painter 

Treasurer Everett C. Test 

1S70 

*Eli V. Cook 

John J. Stubbs* Omaha, Neb 

1871 

•"Walter I). Jones 

*Alvin II. Jenkins 

®I. Macy Good 

C. R. Dixon Lawrence, Kan 

R. G. Boolie Vonkers, N. Y. 

Dallas Sisson Spiceland 

Mary Ballenger (Barnard) New Castle 

Louisa Wickersham Lewisville, R. F. D. r 

Lida Edwards (Saint) New Castle 

1872 

Lindley II. Johnson Dunreith 

•David Henley 

Jacob Hill 

Henry W. Painter New Castle, R. F. D. 1 

Robert G. Mitchell Pacific Grove, Cal 

1S73 

*Sadie D. Talhert (Wright) 

Aaron B. Hell SpringtowH», Ark 

*J. Tihriaii Ilutchins 

John Pennington Cincinnati, O 

HK'ccn.si'd 



Mary Stiibbs (Painter) New Caslle, R. F. D. i 

Nathan William* Oswego, Kan 

Carrie Talbert (Newby) Wichita, Kan 

1874 

Alice Collin (Russell) St. Louis 

Klvira Spencer (Harold) Indianapolis 

J. 1'. Edwards Anderson 

William S. Moflit Kennard 

Edwin (). Kennard Pasadena, Cal 

Nathan Rosen herder Muscatine, Iowa 

W. E. Jackson Kniyhtstown 

C. Mitehell Spiceland 

1875 

W. W. Gregg Spiceland 

William Pidgeon Blooininglon 

Irvin Stanley Westfield 

1877 

Milton Roberts Einnvillc, Iowa 

,878 

S. Ella Bogue (I)ogget) Danville. Ya. 

Helle Chambers (Estes) New Castle 

J. Pinkney Mitchell Fresno, Cal 

Thomas Mitchell Kniglltstown 

Flora Moore (Brady) Indianapolis 

John O. Reed Ann Arbor, Mich 

'•''William S. Seaford 

Fannie Thornburg (Parsons) (iak I 'ark, 111 

1879 

J. A. Buck Muncie 

Carrie Goodwin (Jeffrey) New Castle 

Thomas N'ewlin Guilford, N. C 

1SS0 

J. Edgar Cloud Chicago 

Wm. N. I.amb .., San Francisco, Cal 

Mattie Lamb Outland Amboy 

Ada (Trace Murphy Chattanooga, Tenn 

Ida May Roberts Meiainoras, Mexico 

Emma Belle Roberts Westfield 

Frank Syuions Portland, Me 

Lamira Trueblood (Kellum)" Fricndswood 



— 24 — 



1SS1 

Oscar R. Baker Winchester 

*Corrie Bogue 

Minnie Benedict ( Iilankeuship) Paragon 

Carrie I'nthank ( Kellum) Indianapolis 

*Jessie Stratton 

1S82 

* Arthur II. Baily 

J. Newton Barnard Middletown 

Harriet Bogue (Newlin) Irvington 

Hattie 1C. Dickinson Spiceland 

Charles Newlin Irvington 

■ SS 3 

Anna Hudelson (Foster) Washington, D. C 

Ryland Ratliff Danville 

Julia Stafford ( New by I New Castle, R. F. D. 2 

Emily Weeks Mechanicsburg 

1884 

• : Cora Kirk 

Ella Stratton ( Hod son J New Castle R. F. D. 4. 

Virginia Griffin (Cory) Dunreith 

Isadore Hall (Wilson) Spiceland 

William Julian Hastings, Neb 

Charles Newby Converse 

18S5 

Mary E.Brown (Pennington) Spiceland 

Alfred Y. King Mt. Vernon, 111 

Oliver C. Steele Spiceland 

1S86 

E. Winnie Baily (Clement) Haddenfield, N. J 

Mattie E. Brown Daytona, Fla 

Richard Broad bent El wood 

Elbert Griffin E 1 wood 

Alon/.o C. Hodson New Castle R. F. D. 4 

*JOhii E. McNew 

1887 

Herbert T. Baily Spiceland 

Clarence IE Beard New Castle 

Anna K. Bogue (Shaffer) Benton Harbor, Mich 

■* IK-crascd 



» 



Lindley Comptoii Toinah, Wis 

Elizabeth S. Hiatt (Genau) Crete, Neb 

Abram Miller Woodstock, Canada 

Bert Smith Zionsville 

1S8S 

Rhoda Ballenger (Cuni.inghatri) Indianapolis 

Hannah Brown (Stribbing) Payton, Iowa 

Orynlha Brown (Jester) Payton, Iowa 

*Jessie Butler 

Clara G. Edwards (Knight) St. Louis, Mo 

John C. Cook I New Castle, R. P, D. 2 

Elva Elliott (Comptoii) Tourah, Wis 

Achsah E. RatclifT New Castle 

M, II. Rayl Muucie 

Charles Stubbs Kenllaud 

J. A. Grcenstrect Riehniond 

H. II. RatclifT Mt. Morris, 111 

1S89 

I. aura Benedict Indianapolis 

J-Blamh Braddock (MrNewj Greenfield 

Frank Copekmd Dunreilh 

Estella Deem (Kennedy) Thorn town 

Lawrence Gardner Kriighlstown 

Gertrude Gordon (Genaux) L'tica, O 

Sue Griffin (Evans) Spiccland 

Otis Stubbs Lewisville, R. P. I) 

Mary White Pasadena, Cal 

1S90 

L. Etta Butler Lewisville, R P I) 

Elmer Deem Burlington 

Edwin B. RatclifT Spiceland 

Semite StraUou NewCastle, R. P, 1). ! 

S. E. Stubbs Wilkinson 

1S91 

Ethel M. Copeland (Lee) Meadville, Pa 

Louie Edimtnson (Poe) Knightslown 

Mauriue Gardner (Kern)....: Cadiz 

*IK , cc:isc<1 



Charles N. Hardy Markleville 

Alice Hiatt (Copeland) Marion, Ind 

Ernest Sisson Maxwell 

Alfred II. Symons , North Manchester 

Mary M. Teas Centerville 

Charles Titus Warrington 

Herbert D. Woodard Fountain City 

1S92 

Jesse S. Baily Silverton, Col 

Clara Brown Richmond, Ind 

Warren T. Evans Canby, Minn 

John 1!. Greenstreet ..Lewisville, R. F. D 

Winnie Ilinshaw ( Milligan ) ..Winchester 

David M. Keni]> Keiupton 

Alice Lawrence Spiceland 

Estella Symons Minneapolis, Minn 

Alvin Llrich Greensboro 

Oscar Rogue Spiceland 

Estella Charles Indianapolis 

ploy Hill Pasadena, Cal 

Arthur Ilolloway Oskaloosa, Iowa 

Leora Jessup (Parker) Westland 

John Miller New Castle 

Olen Payne ; , New Castle 

Lena Rayl : Spiceland 

George Smith Kni^htstown 

Orville White Galena, Kan 

1894 

Minnie Black (Moore) Chicago, 111 

Bessie I. Brown ..Davlona, Fla 

Clarence V. Hall ; New Castle 

Horace Hardy Markleville 

Ida Ilolloway (Kenworthy) Richmond 

Arlie Hood New Castle 

Bertha Jessup Clay Center, Neb 

Elma Lawrence Spiceland 

Maud M. Shatter (Payne) New Castle 



— 27 — 



Frank Pitts Indianapolis 

Oscar F. Symons Minneapolis,' Minn 

1895 

Clarence Painter, _ Terre Haute 

Mabel Wright (Garr) Kokoiiio 

Edgar Cox Clark ton, N. C 

*Nellie Ratliff '. 

Howard Henley Tuttle, I. T 

Maud Wildman (Evans) Philadelphia, Pa 

Frank lludelson Mays 

* Pearl Moffett (Wood ) 

1896 

Cora Hudson (Bogue) SpiceTarid 

Clara White (Wildman) Selina, 6 

Elsie lludelson „ Greenfield 

Anna Morris Eincolnville 

Pearl M. James (Tweedy) Wabash 

Mabel Newby(llood) New Castle 

W. J. Carson Chicago 

Nora Gri 111 n (Beach) El wood 

Theresa Wildman ...Philadelphia, Pa 

Roseo F.dwards Knightstown R. F. I) 

1897 

Leoti Applegate (Coffin) Spicelaiid 

Elva M. Hudson (Hall) Spicelaiid 

Lois M. Henley Indianapolis 

Fanny I laves Dunreith 

Floy lludelson Greenfield 

Josie 15. Harlan (Weatherman) Dana 

Jessie Leaky (Iliatt) Spicelaiid R, F. 1) 

Pearl Millikan (Hardy) Marklcville 

Ethel Rifner (Newbv) Englewood, Kan 

Mayme Stafford (Applegate) Spicelaiid 

Clyde Sisson ,,. Spicelaiid 

Minnie Stratton (Stafford) New Castle, R . F. I>. I 

Charles Smith Washington, D. C 

Irving White Lewisville 

1S9S 

ClilTord Applegate v Spicelaiid 

James Holtsclaw Spicelaiid 

"Weceaseil 

— 28 — 



Bavis Nay Springport 

Emory RatcliiT Plainfield 

Gertrude Seaford Spicelaiid 

Pearl Symons Spicelaiid 

Lelia Smith Spicelaiid 

Charles A. Beard New York, N. V 

Merritt Stafford New Castle, R. F. I). 2 

Cora Smith Spicelaiid 

Walter Painter Damascus, O 

Bertha Charles w Spicelaiid 

Ernest Shock ley Straughn 

Elsie Shockley (Lockridge). Peru 

1X99 

Pessie Daisies' Spicelaiid 

Bertha (). Lawrence Spicelaiid 

Florence (). Maey Matainoris, Mexico 

E:\il Moffelt KnigMstowU, R. F, IV. 2 

Waller T. l'earce New Castle, R. F. I). 2 

Orabcll Shaffer New Castle, R. F. I). 2 

1 900 

Ethel Applegate Spicelaiid 

Edgar Ba/.zle Muneie 

Susan Benedict (Nay) Springport 

Cora Charles (Carson) Logansport 

Connie Ciriffii? Alexandria 

David W. Gordon Indianapolis 

Guy H. Hall ; New Lisbon 

Clyde Kennedy Richmond 

Clarence Maey Lewisville, R. F. D 

Everest Maey Lewisville, R. F. 1) 

Carroll Mills Lewisville, R. F. D 

Cecil Newbv Ellgh wood, Kan 

;f Jeaiiettc Rifner ; 

Perniii Thorn burg I Griffin ) Carthage 

John R .Thompson Sulphur Springs 

1 90 1 

Ira E. Bell Spicelaiid 

Bertha E. Butler Spicelaiid 

Raymond Byrkcl El wood 

">.-(..!• ft! 

— 29 — 



Jennie Compton (Cope) Lewisville 

Everett Cope Lewisville 

Deborah Edwards Kniglitstown, R. F. D 

Ethel Edwards Knightstown, R. P. I) 

Lillian H. Hayes Dunreith 

Walter B. Harvey Dunreith 

John R. Hinshaw Greensboro 

Everett Maev Lewisville, R. P. I) 

Georgia Millikan (Hardy) 1 'eudleton 

Jennie E. Millikan Spiceland 

Homer E. Nugen Lewisville 

Cora E. Risk 1 Spiceland 

Robert A. Roberts Blooniingtoh 

Grace E. Stewart (Johnson) Greenfield 

Russel L. Wright Portland, Ore 

Walter C. Wilson Richmond 

1902 

Harley Anderson Spiceland 

Jessie Baily Crestview, Tenn 

Mary Butler Spiceland 

Walter Byers Kniglitstown, R. V. 1). 2 

Jennie Kirk Spiceland 

Gnrney Maple Lewisville 

Manning Smith _______ Mt Sutumit 

Re:: a" Thomas Fountain City 

Retta Thomas Fountain City 

Russell Wilson Spiceland 

India Yost (Cook) Sulphur Springs 

1903 

Rilla Bartlett Lewisville 

Nellie Beckett Spiceland 

Perrin Holt Marklcville 

Arthur Johnson Dunreith 

Carl Newby Englewood, Kan 

Rupert Redic Kniglitstown, R. P. 1) 

Ralph Stubbs Spiceland 

Walter Wright • Indianapolis 

1904 

Elsie Bell „ Spiceland 

Josephine Beeson Kniglitstown 



Will Benedict Spriugport 

Lawrence Bridges Markleville 

Warren Edwards Knightstown, R. P. D 

irl Evans .Mt Summit 

Jessie Gordon Spiceland 

Ruth Harvey Dunreith 

Hazel Heacock (Yockey) Richmond 

Homer Henley Spiceland 

Claire Hoover Spiceland 

Barton Jones Spiceland 

Belva Jordon (Collin) Spiceland 

Guy May Wilkinson 

Pansy Newby Lewisville 

Anna Painter New Castle, R. P. D 

Clara Patterson New Castle, R. F. D 

Lois Pitts Morristown, R. P. I) 

Wendell j'itts Morristown, R. P. 1) 

Lawrence Reeves Markleville 

Robert Reeves Wilkinson 

Etta Rifner .Spiceland 

John Rogers Mooreland 

Herbert Seaford Spiceland 

Ralph Silver Kniglitstown 

Bernetha Smith Spiceland 

Charles Veach Mt Summit 

Ethel Wright Dunreith 

Harold Yockey Richmond 

'9°.S 

Elsie Anderson Spiceland 

Walter Brandy Spiceland 

Raymond I Hike 1 hmrcith 

Alexander Gaiio New Castle, R. I'. 1). 

Oran Griffin Spiceland 

Ruth Gardener New Castle R. P. D. 1 

Elva Ken nan I Kniglitstown, R. 2 

Aura Lane Spiceland 

Edward Pope New Castle, R. P. D. 6 

Jes-iie Re?ee.... Spiceland 

Ruby Reeves Markleville R. 46 

Anna Reeves Wilkinson, R. 2 



■ Arthur Rifner 

Arden Stubbs Spiceland 

Everett Test _ Spiceland 

Amy Thomas Wilkinson, R. I 

Paul Wilson Knightstowti , R. i 

*l)eccased 



DA(_C PRINTING CO., NEW CASTLE, IND, 




— 32 — 




1906-1907 



SPICELAND 
ACADEMY AND NORMAL 
SCHOOL 



SPICELAND, INDIANA 



FACULTY AND CALENDAR 

For the Academic Year 1907-1908 



INSTRUCTORS 

Homer H. COOPER, A. M., Superintendent 
History and Science 

Ethel Pearson, B. S. 
Mathematics and Science 

Emma Kendall, A. B 
Latin and English 

Bible Study 

Music ' 

Nellie Aitleoate 
Elocution and Oratory 



CALENDAR 

1907 

Fall Term begins Tuesday, September 24. 
Fall Term ends Friday, December 20. 
Winter Term begins Tuesday, December 31. 

1908 

Winter Term ends Friday, March 13. 
Spring Term begins Tuesday, March 24. 
Commencement, Friday, June 13. 



BOARD OF TRUSTEES 



Alvin Paintek, President 
Ekfie A. Hall, Secretary 
Jesse BELL, Treasurer 
Arthur W. Osrorne 
SteTH C. Symons 
Charles B. Harvev 



INSTRUCTORS 

For Academic Year 1906-1907 



Homer H. COOPER, A. M., Superintendent 
History and Science 

Ethel Pearson, B. S. 
Mathematics and Science 

Emma Kendall, A. B. 
Latin and English 

Edwin B. Ratcliff 
Normal 

Caroline English 
Music 

Nellie Applegate 
Elocution and Oratory 

Fred E. Smith 
Bible Study 



SPICELAND ACADEMY 



HISTORY. 

PIOELAND ACADEMY is the oldest academy in 
charge of the Friends in Indiana. It was char- 
tered as an academy in INTO, but its history as 
a Friends' school extends over a period of sev- 
enty years. It is under the control of the Spice- 
land Monthly Meeting, by which body the Board of Trus- 
tees is appointed. The teachers are selected by the Trus- 
tees. While the school is under denominational control, 
it is not sectarian in the least; its foundation rests upon 
Christian culture; it has been kept under strong Christian 
influences, and its purpose is to develop practical, earnest, 
and active Christian manhood and womanhood. 

The first class graduated in 1870, The Alumni Asso- 
ciation now enrolls about three hundred forty. About 
three thousand live hundred students have received in- 
struction in the school since its organization as an acad- 
emv. 

LOCATION. 

Spiceland Academy is located in the beautiful town of 
Spiceland, Indiana, in the southern part of Henry county, 
on the Lake Erie & Western railroad, two miles north of 
Dunreith, on the Pennsylvania railroad. The buildings 
are situated in the midst of a beautiful grove, adjoining 

-7 — 



s 



which is a large campus, well adapted to athletic sports. 

The interurban street-car line gives connections with 
surrounding cities. 

ENTRANCE. 

Students may enter at any time, but students coming 
from other schools are required to bring certificates stating 
their literary and moral standing. In the absence of ap- 
proved certificate, examinations will be held and students 
classified accordingly. Classes in Grammar School branches 
are maintained as demand may justify, affording oppor- 
tunity for preparatory work to students who may not be 
eligible to regular academic standing. 

The conditions for admission to the First Year class 
are the same as for entrance to the public high schools of 
this state. 

In general, a graduate from non-commissioned high 
schools of this county can enter the Academy with credit 
for the number of months' work he has studied in his home 
school wherein the work is up to the standard of the com- 
missioned high school. 

THE COURSE OF STUDY IN FOUR YEARS. 

The Academy course of study has been arranged with 
two purposes in view : 

First — It is prepared to conform to the needs and de- 
sires of all students who may not have the opportunity to 
pursue a college course, but who desire a practical educa- 
tion which will prepare them to lead an active and suc- 
cessful life. 

Second — It is arranged to enable students to make the 



necessary preparation for admission in college without 
examination. 

THE COURSE IN THREE YEARS. 

The course of study is so arranged that any pupil who 
may wish to complete the course in three years may do so 
by earnest and faithful work. 

Special opportunity will be given those who wish to 
take advantage of this offer and thus save time and ex- 
pense. 

THE ENGLISH COURSE. 

The completion of the English Course will entitle one 
to a certificate of credit. It is intended for those who 
have no expectation of attending college but who wish to 
be as well prepared as possible for their work in life. 

It is to be understood that the Latin Course is the one 
required for college entrance requirements. 

BIBLE STUDY. 

The study of the Bible is considered of so much import- 
ance that arrangements have been made by which it will 
be taught in the Academy. The subject will be made an 
elective one. Credit will be given as in other studies. 
This will be one of the most valuable studies in the course 
and it is hoped many will take advantage of the work. 



— 9 — 



OUTLINE OF COURSE OF STUDY. 



LATIN COURSE FIRST YEAR ENGLISH COURSE 

First Semester 
Latin Beginning Algebra 
Algebra Ancient History 

Ancient History Composition and Literature 

Composition and Literature Physical Geography. 

Second Semester 
Latin Beginning Algebra 
Algebra Ancient History 

Ancient History Composition and Literature 

Composition and Literat ure Physical Geography 

SECOND YEAR 
First Semester 
C^sar Arithmetic 
Algebra Algebra 
Modern History Modern History 

Rhetoric and Literature Rhetoric and Literature 

Second Semester 

Gisar Arithmetic 

Plane Geometry Plane Geometry 

Modern History Modern History 

Rhetoric and Literature Rhetoric and Literature 
JUNIOR 

Cicero First Semester 

Plane Geometry Plane Geometry 

Physics Physics 

♦American Literature American Literature 

♦Lnclish History English History 

Second Semester 

Cicero 

Plane Geometry Solid Geometry 

Physics Physics 

♦American Literature American Literature 

♦English History English History 

SENIOR 

Virgil First Semester 

English Literature English Literature 

♦Botany Botany 

♦United States History United States History 

♦Physical Geography Political Economy 
♦Arithmetic 

Second Semester 

English Literature English Literature 

♦Botany Botanv 

♦United States History United States History 

♦Bookkeeping Bookkeeping 

♦Bible Study Bible Study 

♦Arithmetic Business Law. 



lective. 



— to — 



Advanced classes in any of the lines of study will be 
formed whenever a sufficient number of pupils desire the 
higher work. The diploma of the Academy will admit the 
student to any of the colleges of Indiana or of other States 
without entrance examinations. 

Higher classes in any subject or classes in subjects not 
offered will be formed whenever there is sufficient demand, 
and tuition will be charged, one dollar per month for each 
study Satisfactory work in these studies may be substi- 
tuted for work in regular course at the discretion of the 
Superintendent. 

The course of study makes provision for a number of 
electives, thus giving the student an opportunity to select 
work along the line of his preference. The thirty-two 
credits required for graduation are distributed among the 
departments as follows: Latin, seven; English, six; His- 
tory, four; Mathematics, six; Science, two; Electives, 
seven. 

It is especially urged that all pupils take the regular 
Latin course of study, and after graduation attend college 
if possible. 

Increased advantages are offered in the arrangements 
made to take elective work in the following departments: 
Music, and Elocution and Oratory. 

ENGLISH. 
I. English Composition. 

The aim of this course is to give the student a practi- 
cal knowledge in the principles of English composition. 
Every student should be able to use correctly his own lan- 
guage both in writing and speaking. Two recitations per 

— ii — 



week are given in this study during each year of the Acad- 
emic course. The student is required to write at least one 
short theme each week. This theme is then discussed by 
the class and carefully criticised by the teacher. 

1st year — Composition and Grammar. 

2nd year — Composition and Rhetoric. 

3rd year— Composition and Rhetoric. 

4th year — Term essays and Thesis. 

II. English Literature. 

The purpose of this course is to create an interest in 
literature for its own sake and to increase the culture of 
the student by developing a love for the best in thought 
and style. This can be done only by a thorough study of 
the masterpieces of the most important English and Amer- 
ican writers. It is desired to emphasize that. the reading 
of the following selections does not constitute the proper 
study of literature. The time element is important. To 
receive credit for a year's work requires nine months' time 
under the careful supervision of an experienced teacher. 

First Year — First semester. (J) Longfellow's Poems, 
(2) Irving's Sketch Book. 3. Whittier's Poems. Home 
Reading, Irving's Alhambra. Second semester. 1. Haw- 
thorne's "Wonder Book 2 Bryant's Poems 3 Cooper's Last 
of the Mohicans. Home Reading — Hawthorne's House of 
Seven (tables. 

Second Year — First semester. 1. Lamb's Tales from 
Shakespeare. 2. Scott's Ivanhoe. 3. Scott's Lady of the 
Lake. Home Reading, Dickens' Tale of Two Cities. Sec- 
ond semester. 1. George Eliot's Silas Marner. 2. Shakes- 
peare's Merchant of Venice. 3. Goldsmith's The Deserted 



Village. 4. Coleridge's The Ancient Mariner. Home 
Reading, Goldsmith's Vicar of Wakefield. 

Junior — First semester. 1. American Literature, New- 
comer. 2. Selections from Poe. 3. Emerson's Essays. 
Home Reading, Elective, Modern Prose Fiction. 

Second semester — 1. American Literature, Newcomer. 
2. Webster's Oration, selected. 3. Lowell's Poems. 4. 
Holmes' Autocrat of the Breakfast Table. 

Senior — First Semester. 1. English Literature, New- 
comer. 2. Shakespeare's Hamlet and Macbeth. 3. Pope's 
Translation of the Iliad. 4. Milton's Paradise Lost or 
Milton's Minor Poems. Home Beading, selected. 

Second semester — 1. English Literature, Newcomer. 
2. Burke's Conciliation with the American Colonies. 3. 
Tennyson's The Princess or Tennyson's Idylls of the King. 
4. Ruskin's Sesame and Lilies. 

HISTORY. 

The course in History is now arranged to conform to 
the recommendations of the Committee of Seven of the 
American Historical Association. 

Besides the culture value of history, it is to be remem- 
bered that it is the study which furnishes the student the 
ideals of character which lead to the highest moral growth. 
The student should thoroughly understand the institu- 
tional life of the people studied. 

The purposes of history in the Academy are as follows : 

First — The development of moral character. History 
as the study of institutional life and of character teaches 
us to watch the progress of humanity in the rise and fall 
of nations. Success or failure in national life or in the 
life of a person will cause us to adopt for ourselves and 

— 13 — 



our country that which has proven of excellent worth. 
History helps us to avoid the mistakes of other people and 
nations. 

Second— The teaching of patriotism and the broaden- 
ing of our interests and sympathies. While we wish to be 
familiar with our own government and national character 
we must recognize the broad principle of the universal 
brotherhood of men. 

Third — The development of our powers of judgment. 
It is here that we especially study the relation between 
cause and effect. Every statesman has been a student of 
history. In studying the problems of life which have con- 
fronted other people we are greatly aided in the practical 
solution of the life problems of to-day. 

Fourth— The acquirement of useful facts. This 
though generally considered of most importance, is in 
fact but a subordinate purpose in the study of history. 

Fifth — The gaining of a broad and practical general- 
culture. The work consists of a study of Ancient History 
in the first year; a special study of Medieval and Modern 
History in the second year; of English History in the third 
year; U.S. History ami Civil Government m the fourth 
year. 

MATHEMATICS. 

The aim in this study is to introduce the student to 
mathematical methods and develop in him the power to 
reason clearly and accurately on any given problem. Al- 
gebra is studied throughout the first year of the high school 
and the first half of the second year ; Geometry during the 
last half of the second year and through the third year. 
A great deal of supplementary work is given in Algebra, 

— U — 



and original exercises are introduced as much as possible 
in Geometry. 

LATIN. 

There is no subject in the Academy which has greater 
disciplinary value to the pupil than the study of Latin. It 
trains and strengthens the memory, cultivates and quick- 
ens the preception, and develops habits of ready, accurate 
and sound thinking. 

A very large per cent, of all the words used in the 
dictionary will be of Latin origin, therefore some knowl- 
edge of tli is subject is absolutely necessary for a. correct 
understanding of our own English language. It gives us a 
key to a quicker understanding of all that we read or hear. 
It is essential to all who are to continue the work in col- 
lege. It is helpful to every professional man. It will give 
us a greater appreciation of the Latin writers and speak- 
ers. It increases our general culture and contributes to 
our broader discipline. 

The course in Latin is required of all who receive a 
diploma. In special cases, to lit the student for college, 
equivalent subjects may be substituted. 

SCIENCE. 

The Academy is supplied with sufficient apparatus to 
be a valuable aid in the study of natural sciences. In 
Physics the subject is illustrated by many simple pieces of 
apparatus, besides the air pump, electrical machine, bat- 
teries; etc. Geology and Mineralogy are illustrated by a 
collection of more than twelve hundred specimens, pre- 
sented to the Academy by the Alumni. In Zoology and 
Botany, animals and plants are studied from nature, and 

- 15- 



systems of classifications are made prominent. In all the 
sciences objects are used as much as possible. 

The following are the purposes in Science work: 
First — To interest the pupil in the observation of na- 
ture. 

Second — To develop the power of reasoning through 
the original investigation of the truths of nature. 

Third — To give a practical knowledge of the elemen- 
tary principles of those sciences which are now, in a great 
measure, causing our rapid progress in the civilization of 
the world. 

NORMAL DEPARTMENT 

For several years past special arrangements have been 
made to give those students desiring to teach, the oppor- 
tunity of normal instruction during the spring term. A 
special normal instructor has been employed, and many 
students of this and adjoining counties have availed them- 
selves of this opportunity. 

In the spring term, classes will be provided for those 
beginning the Normal work, and for those who have done 
one term's work. 

It is not the purpose of high schools to give students a 
teacher's knowledge of legal branches. However, it is 
known that many high-school graduates desire to teach. 
This course of Normal work is especially fitted for this 
class of students. 

In the Normal course it is not intended to conduct a 
scheme of cramming for examination, but it is our inten- 
tion to help teachers in their school quite as much as to aid 
them get license. 



Work will be so arranged that students who desire to 
take part in academic work and part normal work will be 
accommodated. 

COURSE IN MUSIC 

Vocal and instrumental music will be taught by an 
experienced teacher. 

In the beginning course students who have known 
nothing of music will be taught to read readily and sing 
ordinary church music. Advanced work will be given to 
prepare students to form and conduct chorus classes and to 
teach music in the public schools. 

Excellent opportunity will be offered to all students 
who wish to take special courses in instrumental music. 

GENERAL ITEMS 

The government of the school is based upon the idea 
that manhood is more than scholarship; that self-respect 
and self-control on the part of a student are important 
factors in the formation of character. Greater stress is 
laid upon the thoroughness of instruction and accuracy of 
knowledge than upon rapidity of advancement. 

For many years the health of students has been uni- 
formly good. There is probably no better location in the 
State in this respect. 

The Friends and Methodists both hold religious ser- 
vices on the Sabbath and each maintains a Sabbath school. 
Meetings of the Young People's Society of Christian En- 
deavor and the Epworth League are held every Sabbath 
evening, and students are welcome to their meetings and 
membership. 

-\7- 



A sufficient number of teachers is constantly employed 
so that large classes may be avoided, and students may re- 
ceive personal attention during the recitation. 

Expenses are as low as at any other school affording 
equal advantages. 

The managers of the school are very careful to make 
this an institution in which students who are away from 
home and its restraints will be surrounded by good, moral 
influences, and in this they have the co-operation of the 
citizens of the village. There are no beer, liquor or bil- 
liard saloons in the village. 

No student whose influence is known to have a cor- 
rupting tendency will be retained in the school. 

DIPLOMAS. 

Students whose conduct is exemplary, and who com- 
plete the course of study and prepare and deliver a suita- 
ble literary production, will be furnished a diploma, signed 
by the instructors and the President and Secretary of the 
Board of Trustees. To receive a diploma a student should 
be in attendance at the Academy one year, except when 
special arrangements are made with the Superintendent 
and Board of Trustees. 

LECTURES. 

Students have the opportunity to hear good lectures 
at small expense. Addresses on various subjects are given 
during the year. 

LITER A RY EXERCISES. 

Literary exercises may be required of all students in 
all grades, both in class work and before the public. Care 
is used that students may learn the art of composition and 

— 18 — 



public delivery. Essays and declamations are a part of the 
regular school work in the department of oratory. 



LIBRARIES. 

Four sets of encyclopedias are in the school rooms, 
and these, with the dictionaries and numerous reference 
books, are for the free use of all. There is a large library 
in connection with the school, which comprises about three 
thousand volumes. 

TEXTS USED DURING THE YEAR. 

First Latin Collar and Daniel 

Classics Various Texts 

English Selections 

Rhetoric Kavana and Beatty 

EnglishLiterature Newcomer 

Algebra Wells 

Geometry Wentworth 

Physical Geography Davis 

Physics 1 Gage 

Chemistry Cooley 

Astronomy Steel-Todd 

Botany Bailey 

Psychology Halleck 

English History Wrong 

Civics . Fiske 

Political Economy ..Walker 

U. S. History Ghanning 

Grammar Wisely 

Physiology Macy and Norris 

Ancient History West 

Modern Hi story Myers 

American Literature ... Newcomer 

Grammar Latin Bennett 

Caesar Bennett 

Cicero Bennett 

Virgil Bennett 

— 19 — 



EXPENSES 



RATES OF TUITION. 

Academic classes for each study $1.00 per month 

Academic classes for two or more studies, 2.00 per month 
Normal classes for each study 1.00 per month 

Students who enter at irregular times will be charged 
full tuition for the term in case they complete the term's 
work in such manner as to receive credit toward the di- 
ploma. 

Normal students and others who do not expect to earn 
credit in the regular course will be charged only for the 
time of actual enrollment in the classes. 

Occasionally those who are especially strong are per- 
mitted to earn credits by outside study under the super- 
vision of the teachers. For such credits as these one-half 
the regular tuition will be charged. 

Tuition is due at the opening of each term, and settle- 
ment should be made with the Superintendent or the 
Treasurer of the Board of Trustees. Students will receive 
no credit for their work until the tuition is paid. 

BOARDING. 

The citizens of Spicelaud have always given the stu- 
dents a hearty welcome by receiving them into their homes. 
The cost of boarding ami rooms in private families where 
everything is tarnished can be had for $2.00 to $.'J.OO a 
week. Rooms, both furnished and unfurnished, can be 
had from 25 to 50 cents a week, and table board of excel- 
lent quality at the rate of $1.50 to $2.00 for the full week. 

Thus persons who may live near enough to go home at 
the end of each week and who wish to economize, may 
reduce the cost of living to a very small sum. 



LIST 


OF STUDENTS 




SENIORS 


Bartlett, Hazel 


Painter, Levinus 


Bell, Irene 


Seaford, Howard 


Bowers, Bertha 


Smith, Clenna 


MeDamel, Ruby 


Williams, Hassel 




JUNIORS 


Brown, Paul 


Land, Elba 


Chandler, Ethel 


McDaniel, Paul 


Daugherty, John 


McLean, Cliitord 


Delon, Loma 


Moore, Fred 


English, Leslie 


Seaford, Mary 


Hardin, Margaret 


Sidwell, Bessie 


Kennard, Everett 


Wilson, Lucile 


Kirkham, Glenn 




SOPHOMORES. 


Arnold, Beula 


Pennington, Elgar 


Butler, Loren 


Ratliffj Estus 


Cooper, Minnie 


Reese, Hoyt 


Delou, Elbert 


Simmons, Minnie 


Hays, Walter 


Smith, Margaret 


Heacock, Hattie 


Wilkinson, Vaughn 


Iludelson, Ruth 


Williams, Poss 


Jarrett, Ada 


Wilson, Perry 


McGrady, .James 


Wright, Nettie 


Moflitt, Griffin 




FRESHMEN 


Antrim, Mary 


Moffitt, Ruth 


Brandy, Russel 


Seaford, Hazel 


Coffin, Arthur 


Sidwell, Lulu 


Griffin, Mary 


Smith, William 



— 21 — 



Harold, Anna 
Hendrick, Marie 
flenshaw, Bernice 
Riser, Minnie 
Manlove, Vier 
Markle, Andrew 
Moffitt, Bessie 



Stigleman, Edith 
Taylor, Will 
Taylor, Leanna 
Test Ralph 
Vaughn, Mollie 
"Wilson, Kerney 



Bitner, Alva 
Fields, Hazel 
Hoover, Edgar 
Matthews, Mabel 
Modlin, John 
Mougle, Williard 
( )sborne, Alma 
Osborne, Mary 



IRREGULAR 

Pearce, May 
I Scoville, Macey 
Shaffer, Frances 
Thomas, Murray 
Wales, Ada 
Williams, Nellie 
Woodward Floyd 



ALUMNI 



OFFICERS 1907-1908 

President Richard Broadbent 

Vice-President William S. Moffitt 

Secretary - - Els = ie I5e11 

Treasurer... Arden Stubbs 

i Elsie Anderson 

Executive Committee. <• Jessie Gordon 

( Everett Test 

Orator R.G.Boone 

Vice-Orator — - C> scar R - I5aker 

Historian Walter Wright 

Vice-Historian ..Alice Lawrence 

5870 

*Eli U. Cook - - 

John J. Stubbs..... ----- — 0maha - Neb 



187J 

♦Walter D.Jones 

*Alvin H. Jenkins 

*I. Macy Good 

C. R. Dixon Lawrence, Kan 

R. G. Boone Yonkers, X. Y. 

Dallas Sisson . Spiceland 

Mary Ballenger (Barnard) New Castle 

Louisa Wickersham Lewisville, R. F. D. I 

Lida Edwards (Saint) New Castle 

1872 

Lindley H. Johnson Dunreith 

*David Henley - 

♦Jacob Hill 

Henry W. Painter New Castle, R. F. D. I 

Robert G. Mitchell Pacific Grove, Cai 

J 873 

*Sadie I). Talbert (Wright) - - 

Aaron B. Bell Springtown, Ark 

*J. Tilman Hutchins 

John Pennington ..Ypsilanti, Mich., R. F. D. i 

Mary Stubbs (Painter) New Castle, R. F. D. I 

Nathan Williams Oswego, Kan 

Carrie Talbert (Newby).. Wichita, Kan 

1874 

Alice Coffin (Russell) New York City 

Elvira Spencer (Harold) Indianapolis 

J, P. Edwards Knightstown 

William S. Moffit Kennard 

Edwin O. Kennard ...Pasadena, Cal 

Nathan Rosenberger Muscatine, Iowa 

W. E.Jackson — ... Knightstown 

D. C. Mitchell „ Spiceland 

J 875 

W. W. Gregg . _ Spiceland 

William Pidgeon Mooresville 

Irvin Stanley Westfield 

: J)t'CC)ISC<i. 

— 23 — 



J 877 



Milton Roberts' Linnville, Iowa 

1878 

S. Ella Bogue (Dogget) Danville, Va 

Belle Chambers (Estes) New Castle 

J. Pinkney Mitchell Fresno, Cal 

Thomas Mitchell . Knightstown 

Flora Moore (Brady) Indianapolis 

John O. Reed - —Ann Arbor, Mich 

♦William S. Seaford 

Fannie Thornburg (Parsons) + Oak Park, 111 

J 879 

J. A. Buck Muncie 

Carrie Goodwin (Jeffrey) ...New Castle 

Thomas Newlin... Guilford, N. C. 

J 880 

J. Edgar Cloud Lafayette 

Win, N. Lamb San Francisco, Cal 

Mattie Lamb Outland Amboy 

Ada Grace Murphy - ..Chattanooga, Tenn 

Ida May Roberts .Matehuala 

Emma Belle Roberts Westfield 

Frank Symons - Portland, Me 

Lamira Trueblood (Kellum).. Camby 

J88J 

Oscar R. Baker Winchester 

♦Corrie Bogue 

Minnie Benedict ( Blankenship). Paragon 

Carrie Unthank (Kellum) Irvington 

♦Jessie Stratton. 

1382 

•Arthur H. Baily 

J. Newton Barnard Daleville 

Harriet Bogue (Newlin) - Irvington 

Hattie E. Dickinson .. Spiceland 

Charles Newlin ... Irvington 

('Deceased. 



— 24 — 



1883 

Anna Hudelson (Foster) Washington, D. C. 

Ryland Ratliff ... Danville 

Julia Stafford (Newby) ..New Castle, R. F. D. 2 

Emily Weeks Middletown R. F. D. i 

1884 

*Cora Kirk 

Ella Stratton (Hodson) New Castle, K. F. D. 4 

Virginia Griffin (Cory) Dunreith 

Isadore Hall (Wilson). Spiceland 

William Julian Hastings, Neb 

Charles Newby Converse 

1835 

Mary L. Brown (Pennington)... Spiceland 

Alfred Y. King Mt. Vernon, 111 

Oliver C. Steele ..Spiceland 

1886 

L.Winnie Baily (Clement).- Haddonfield, N. J. 

Mattie E. Brown Daytona, Fla 

Richard Broadbent ..Elwood 

Elbert Griffin Elwood 

Alonzo C. Hodson New Castle, R. F. D. 4 

♦John L. McNew 

1887 

Herbert T. Baily ..Spiceland 

Clarence H. Beard ..New Castle 

Anna K. liogue (Shaffer) Benton Harbor, Mich 

Lindley Compton Tomah, Wis 

Elizabeth S. Hiatt (Genau). Omaha, Neb 

Abr am Miller Woodstock, Canada 

Bert Smith... Zionsville 

1888 

Khoda Ballenger (Cunningham) Indianapolis 

Hannah Brown (Stribbing) Payton, Iowa 

Oryntha Brown (Jester).. Payton, Iowa 

♦Jessie Butler 

oDeceusod. 

■-25- 



Clara G. Edwards (Knight) St. Louis, Mo 

John C. Cook . New Castle, R. F. D. 2 

Elva Elliott (Compton) Tomah, Wis 

Achsah E. Ratcliff New Castle 

H, H. Ravi Muncie 

Charles Stubbs Plainfield 

J" A. Greenstreet... ... Richmond 

H. H. Ratcliff Mt. Morris, 111 

J 889 

Laura Benedict Indianapolis 

Blanch Braddock (McNew) T .Greenfield 

Frank Copeland Dunreith 

Estella Deem (Kennedy) Thorntown 

*Lawrence Gardner 

Gertrude Gordon (Genaux) Spiceland 

Sue Griffin (Evans).- Spiceland 

Otis Stubbs Lewisville, R. F. D. 

Mary White Pasadena, Cal 

1890 

L. Etta Butler Lewisville R. F. D. 

Elmer Deem Frankfort 

Edwin B. Ratcliff Spiceland 

Bennie Stratum. New Castle, R. l'\ D. 1 

S. E. Stubbs Wilkinson 

1891 

Ethel M. Copeland (Lee) Meadville, Pa 

Louie Edmundson fPoe) --- ...Charlottesville 

Maurine Gardner (Kern) Cadiz 

Charles N. llardv Markleville 

Alice Hiatt .(Copeland) Marion, Ind 

Ernest Sisson ...Greenfield 

Alfred H. Symons ........ Fort Yeats, North Dakota 

Mary M. Teas Centerville 

Charles Titus Warrington 

Herbert D. Woodard Fountain City 



♦Deceased. 



— 26 — 



1892 

Jesse S. Baily Silverton, Col 

Clara Brown Earlham, Ind 

Warren T. Evans.. Canby, Minn 

John B. Greenstreet .Lewisville, R. F. D. 

Winnie Hinshaw (Milligan) Winchester 

David M.Kemp Kempton 

Alice Lawrence Spiceland 

Estella Symons Minneapolis, Minn 

Alvin Ulrich j. Greensboro 

1893 

Oscar Bogue - ...... Spiceland 

Estella Charles Indianapolis 

Floy Hill Pasadena, Cal 

Arthur Holloway .Oskaloosa, Iowa 

Leora Jessup (Parker) Westland 

John Miller.. New Castle 

Olen Payne New Castle 

Lena Rayl Spiceland 

George Smith • Knightstown 

Orville White Galena, Kan 

1894 

Minnie Black (Moore) _ Chicago, 111 

Bessie 1. Brown Daytona, Fla 

Clarence V. Hall New Castle 

Horace Hardy . Markleville 

Ida Holloway (Ken worthy) Richmond 

Arlie Hood Chicago 

Bertha Jessup Clay Center, Neb 

Elma Lawrence. Spiceland 

Maud M. Shaffer (Payne) New Castle 

Frank Pitts Indianapolis 

Oscar F. Symons Minneapolis, Minn 

1895 

Clarence Painter Helena, Ark 

Mabel Wright (Garr) Kokomo 



-27- 



Edgar Cox ; ...i. Clarkton, N. C. 

♦Nellie Ratliff 

Howard Henley _ Tuttle I. T. 

Maud Wildman (Evans) Philadelphia, Pa 

Frank Hudelson .Mays 

*Pearl Moffett (Wood) 

1896 

Cora Hudson (Bogue) Spiceland 

Clara White (Wildman) Selina, O. 

Elsie Hudelson .Greenfield 

Anna Morris . Wabash 

Pearl M. James (Tweedy) Wabash 

Mabel Newby (Hood) Chicago 

W. J. Carson _ Chicago 

Nora Griffin (Beach) New Castle 

Theresa Wildman... Philadelphia, Pa 

Roscoe Edwards Moreland 

J 897 

Leoti Applegate (Coffin) Spiceland 

Elva M Hudson (Hall)... Spiceland 

Lois M. Henley Indianapolis 

Fanny Hayes ... Dunreith 

Floy Hudelson ..Greenfield 

Josie B. Harlan (Weatherman; Uana 

Jessie Leaky (Hiatt) ..New Lisbon 

Pearl Millikan (Hardy) Markleville 

Ethel Kifner (Newby) Englewood, Kan 

Mayme Stafford (Applegate) Spiceland 

Clyde Sisson Spiceland 

Minnie Stratton (Stafford New Castle, R. F. D. i 

Charles Smith Washington, D. C. 

*Irving White __ 

1898 

Clifford Applegate.. Spiceland 

James Holtsclaw Spiceland 

"•'Defeased. 

— 2S — 



Bavis Nay ..Springport 

Emory Ratcliff Madison, Wis 

Gertrude Seaford ...Spiceland 

Pearl Symons ..Spiceland 

Lelia Smith Spiceland 

Charles A. Beard New York, N. Y. 

Merritt Stafford Westland 

Cora Smith ..Spiceland 

Walter Painter Upland 

Bertha Charles Marlern, Mont 

Ernest Shockley Angora 

Elsie Shockley (Lockridge) Bloomington 

1899 

Bessie Haisley Spiceland 

Bertha O. Lawrence Oskaloosa, Iowa 

Florence O. Macy Metamoris, Mexico 

Earl Moffett Knightstown, R. F. D. 2 

Walter T. Pearce ...New Castle, R. F. U. 2 

Orabell Shaffer (Bell) ...New Castle, R. F. D. 2 

1900 

Ethel Applegate ; ...Spiceland 

Edgar Bazzle Muncie 

Susan Benedict (Nay) Springport 

Cora Charles (Carson) Logansport 

Connie Griffin Alexandria 

David W. Gordon Indianapolis 

Guy H. Hall New Lisbon 

Clyde Kennedy Richmond 

Clarence Macy -Hot Springs, S. Dak 

Everest Macy Gainesville, Fla 

Carroll Mills Lewisville, R. F. D. 

Cecil Newby Englewood, Kan 

Jeanette Rifner 

Pernia Thornburg (Griffin) - _ Russellville, 111 

John R. Thompson Sulphur Springs 

1901 

Ira E. Bell New Castle, R. F. D.2 



— 29 — 



Bertha E. Butler (Ballard) Lewisville 

Raymond Byrket.. Elwood 

Jennie Compton (Cope) __ Pendleton 

Everett Cope Pendleton 

Deborah Edwards . Knightstown, R. F. D. 

Ethel Edwards (Kramein) Bloomington, III 

Lillian H. Hayes. Dunreith 

Walter B. Harvey . Dunreith 

John R. Hinshaw . Greensboro 

Everett Macy Lewisville, R. F. D. 

Georgia Millikan (Hardy) .. Pennleton 

Jennie E. Millikan . Spiceland 

Homer E. Nugen Lewisville 

Cora E. Risk. Spiceland 

Robert A. Roberts Bloomington 

Grace F. Stewart (Johnson) Greentield 

Russell L. Wright ... Portland, Ore 

Walter C. Wilson St. Cloud, Minn 

1902 

Harley Anderson.. Spiceland 

Jessie Bailv Crestview, Tenn 

Mary Butler Spiceland 

Walter Byers Knightstown, R. F. D. 2 

Jennie Kirk Spiceland 

.Gurney Maple ....Lewisville 

Manning Smith Mt. Summit 

Rena Thomas Richmond 

Retta Thomas Fountain City 

Russell Wilson Spiceland 

India Yost (Cook) Sulphur Springs 

J903 

Rilla Bartlett Lewisville 

Nellie Beckett .... Spiceland 

Perrin Holt Markleville 

Arthur Johnson ...Dunreith 

Carl Newby Gate, Oklahoma 

Rupert Redic ..Salt Lake City 



— 30- 



Ralph Stubbs Spiceland 

Walter Wright Spiceland 

J904 

Elsie Bell. Spiceland 

Josephine Beeson Knightstown 

Will Benedict Springport 

Lawrence Bridges Markleville 

Warren Edwards Knightstown, R. F. D. 

Irl Evans Mt. Summit 

Jessie Gordan. Spiceland 

Ruth 1 larvey Dunreith 

Ha/el Heacock (Yockey) New Castle 

Homer Henley Spiceland 

Claire Hoover Spiceland 

Barton Jones Spiceland 

Belva Jordon (Coffin).. Spiceland 

Guy May Wilkinson 

Pansy Newby Lewisville 

Anna Painter . , New Castle, R. F. D. 

Clara Patterson (Rothrock) New Castle, L. F. D. 

Lois Pitts Morristown, R. F. D. 

Wendell Pitts . Morristown, R. F. D. 

Lawrence Reeves Markleville 

Robert Reeves Wilkinson 

Etta Rifner Spiceland 

John Rogers Mooreland 

Herbert Seaford Spiceland 

Ralph Silver Knightstown 

Bernetha Smith Spiceland 

Charles Yeach... Mt. Summit 

Ethel Wright (Hershaur) Dunreith 

Harold Yockey ..New Castle 

J 905 

Elsie Anderson Spiceland 

Walter Brandy Spiceland 

Raymond Duke Indianapolis 



— 31 — 



Alexander Gano New Castle, R. F. D. 

Oran Griffin Indianapolis 

Ruth Gardner .New Castle, R. F. D. i 

Elva Kennard _ Knightstown, R. 2 

Aura Lane Indianapolis 

Edward Pope New Castle, R. F. C. 6 

Jessie Reece Spiceland 

Ruby Reeves _. Markleville, R. 46 

Anna Reeves Wilkinson, R. 2 

*Arthur Rifner.. 

Arden Stubbs... _ Spiceland 

Everett Test... _ Spiceland 

Amy Thomas Greencastle 

Paul Wilson.. Knightstown, R. 1 

J 906 

Charles Bundy Spiceland 

Walter Rnndy Spiceland 

Arthur Hudelson Spiceland 

Hazel Hudelson.. Dunreith 

Edna Kellar .„ Lewisville 

Frances Nugen Dunreith 

Myron Painter Spiceland 

Edgar Rogers Mooreland 

Otis Shaffer ...Richmond 

Maud Simmons ..Wilkinson 

Grover VanDine Shirley 

Orville Wright New Castle, R. F. D. 



-Deceased. 




Knightstown IIBannor Print. 




— 32 — 



I 

j 



_ _ 

Knlghtstown Banner Print. 



i 



i 
i 



i 



FACULTY AND CALENDAR 

For the Academic Year 1908-1909 



INSTRUCTORS 



Homer H. Cooper, A. M., Superintendent 
History and Science 

Emma Kendall, A. B. 
Latin and English 

Ethel H. Publow 
Mathematics and Science 

Drawing 

Music 

Nellie Applegate 
Elocution and Oratory 



CALENDAR 



1908 

Fall Term begins Tuesday, September 15. 
Fall Term ends Thursday, December 24. 

1909 

Winter Term begins Tuesday, January 5. 
Winter Term ends Friday, March 10. 
Spring Term begins Tuesday, March 30. 
Commencement, Friday, June 4. 



BOARD OF TRUSTEES 



Alvin Painter, President 

S. B. Lane, Secretary and Treasurer 

Jesse Bell 

Arthur W. Osborn 

Seth C. Symons 

Charles B. Harvey 



INSTRUCTORS 
Academic Year 1907-1908 



Homer H. Cooper, A. M„ Superintendent 
History and Science 

Ethel Pearson, B. S. 
Mathematics and Science 

Emma Kendall, A. B, 
Latin and English 

Emily Hyde 
Drawing 

Music 

Nellie Applegate 
Elocution and Oratory 



SPICELAND ACADEMY 



HISTORY 

ptrplmtiJ AradfUUJ is the oldest academy in charge 
of the Friends in Indiana. It was chartered as an 
academy in 1870, but its history as a Friends' 
school extends over a period of seventy years. It 
is under the control of the Spiceland Monthly Meeting, by 
which body the Board of Trustees is appointed. The 
teachers are selected by the Trustees. While the school 
is under denominational control, it is not sectarian in the 
least; its foundation rests upon Christian culture ; it lias 
been kept under strong Christian inlluences, and its pur- 
pose is to develop practical, earnest, and active Christian 
manhood and womanhood. 

The first class graduated in INTO. The Alumni Asso- 
ciation now enrolls about three hundred and forty. About 
three thousand five hundred students have received in- 
struction in the school since its organization as an academy. 

LOCATION 

Spiceland Academy is located in the beautiful town of 
Spiceland, Indiana, in the southern part of Ilenry county, 
on the Lake Erie & Western railroad, two miles north of 
Dunreith, on the l'ennsylvania railroad. The buildings 
are situated in the midst of a beautiful grove, adjoining 




which is a large campus, well adapted to athletic sports. 
The interurban street-car line gives connections with sur- 
rounding cities. 

ENTRANCE 

Students may enter at any time, but- students coming 
from other schools are required to bring certificates stating 
their literary and moral standing. In the absence of ap- 
proved certificate, examinations will be held and students 
classified accordingly. Classes in Grammar School branches 
are maintained as demand may justify, affording oppor- 
tunity for preparatory work to students who may not be 
eligible to regular academic standing. 

The conditions for admission to the First Year class 
are the same as for entrance to the public high schools of 
this State. 

In general, a graduate from uou-eoniniissioned high 
schools of this county can enter the Academy with credit 
for the number of months' work he has studied in his 
home school wherein the work is up to the standard of the 
commissioned high school. 

THE COURSE OF STUDY IN FOUR YEARS 

The Academy course of study has been arranged with 
two purposes in view : 

First — It, is prepared to conform to the needs and de- 
sires of all students who may not have the opportunity to 
pursue a college course, but who desire a practical educa- 
tion which will prepare them to lead an active and suc- 
cessful life. 

Second— It is arranged to enable students to make the 

> — 6 — 



necessary preparation for admission in college without 
examination. 

THE COURSE IN THREE YEARS 

The course of study is so arranged that any pupil who 
may wish to complete the course in three years may do so 
by earnest and faithful work. 

Special opportunity will be given those who wish to 
take advantage of this offer and thus save time and ex- 
pense. 

THE ENGLISH COURSE 

The completion of the English Course will entitle one 
to a certificate of credit. It is intended for those who 
have no expectation of attending college but who wish to 
be as well prepared as possible for their work in life. 

It is to be understood that the College Preparatory 
Course is the one required for college entrance require- 
ments. 

BIBLE STUDY 

The study of the Bible is considered of so much import- 
ance that arrangements have been made by which it will 
be taught in the Academy. The subject will be made an 
elective one. Credit will be given as in other studies. 
This will be one of the most valuable studies in the course, 
and it is hoped many will take advantage of the work. 

STATE CERTIFICATE OF EQUIVALENCY 

The State Board of Education has given the Academy 
a Certificate of Equivalency. This enables the graduates 
to enter any college in the State without an examination. 



— 7 — 



OUTLINE OF COURSE OF STUDY 



COLLEGE PREPARATORY 

Latin Beginning 
English I 
Algebra 
♦Physical Geography 

Latin Beginning 
English I 
Algebra 
♦Physical Geography 



Algebra 
English II 
Caesar 

Ancient History 

Plane Geometry 
English II 
C;t:s.»r 

Ancient History 



Plane Geometry 
Physics 
Cicero 
♦Modern History 

Solid Geometry 

Physics 

Cicero 

♦Modern History 



English IV 
♦Botany 

Vergil 
♦United States History 

English IV 
♦Botany 
Elect 

♦United States History 



FIRST YEAR 
First Semester 



Second Semester 



SECOND YEAR 
First Semester 



Second Semester 



JUNIOR 
First Semester 



Second Semester 



SENIOR 
First Semester 



Second Semester 



ENGLISH 

Latin Beginning 
English I 
Algebra 
♦Physical Geography 

Latin Beginning 
English I 
Algebra 
♦Physical Geography 



Algebra 
English II 
Csesar 

Ancient History 

Algebra 
English II 
Oesar 

Ancient History 



Plane Geometry 
Physics 
♦Agriculture 
Modern History 

♦Bible Study 

Physics 
♦Agriculture 

Modern History 



English IV 
♦Botany 
♦Arithmetic 
♦United States History 

English IV 
♦Botany 
♦Arithmetic 
♦United States History 



ec;,,),;,.,,., marked with a star are elective. In place of those marked, the 
Solid Geometry, Ver«il, Music, Drawing, and Special elective. 



Advanced classes in any of the lines of study will be 
formed whenever a sufficient number of pupils desire the 
higher work. The diploma of the Academy will admit 
the student to any of the colleges in Indiana or of other 
States without entrance examinations. 

Higher classes in any subject or classes in subjects not 
offered will be formed whenever there is sufficient demand, 
and tuition will be charged, one dollar per mouth for each 
study. Satisfactory work in these studies may be substi- 
tuted for work in regular course at the discretion of the 
Superintendent. 

The course of study makes provision for a number of 
electives, thus giving the student an opportunity to select 
work along the line of his preference. The thirty-two 
credits required for graduation are distributed among the 
departments as follows: Latin, seven; English, six; His- 
tory, two ; Mathematics, six ; Science, two; Electives, nine. 

It is especially urged that all pupils take the regular 
College Preparatory Course of study, and after graduation 
attend college, if possible. 

Increased advantages are offered in the arrangements 
made to take elective work in the following departments : 
Drawing, Music, and Elocution and Oratory. 

ENGLISH 

I. English Composition. 

The aim of this course is to give the student a practi- 
cal knowledge in the principles of English composition. 
Every student should be able to use correctly his own lan- 
guage both in writing and in speaking. Two recitations 
per week are given in this study during each year of the 



— 9 — 



Academic course. The studeut is required to write at 
least one short theme each week. This theme is then dis- 
cussed by the class and carefully criticised by the teacher. 

1st year — Composition and Grammar. 
2nd year — Composition and Rhetoric. 
3rd year — Composition and Rhetoric. 
4th year — Term Essays and Thesis. 

II. English Literature. 

The purpose of this course is to create an interest in 
literature for its own sake and to increase the culture of 
the student by developing a love for the best in thought 
and style. This can be done only by a thorough study of 
the masterpieces of the most important English and Amer- 
ican writers. It is desired to emphasize that the reading 
of the following selections does not constitute the proper 
study of literature. The time element is important. To 
receive credit for a year's work requires nine months' 
time under the careful supervision of an experienced 
teacher. 

First Year— First semester. 1, Longfellow's Poems; 
2, Irving's Sketch Book; 3, Whittier's Poems; Home 
Reading, Irving's Alhambra. Second semester — 1, Haw- 
thorne's Wonder Hook; 2, Bryant's Poems; 3, Cooper's 
Last of the Mohicans; Home Reading,' selected. 

Second Year— First semester. 1, Lamb's Tales from 
Shakespeare; 2, Scott's Ivan hoe; 3, Scott's Lady of the 
Lake; Home Reading, selected. Second semester— 1, 
George Eliot's Silent Mariner; 2, Shakespeare's Merchant 
of Venice; 3, Goldsmith's The Deserted Village: 4, Cole- 
ridge's The Ancient Mariner ; Home Reading, Goldsmith's 
Vicar of Wakefield. 

— 10 - 



Junior — First semester. 1, American Literature, New- 
comer; 2, Selections from Poe; 2; Emerson's Essays; 
Home Reading, elective, modern prose fiction. Second 
semester — 1, American Literature, Newcomer; 2, Web- 
ster's Oration, selected; 3, Lowell's Poems; 4, Holmes' 
Autocrat of the Breakfast Table. 

Senior — First semester. 1, English Literature, New- 
comer; 2, Shakespeare's Hamlet and Macbeth; 3, Pope's 
Translation of the Iliad; 4, Milton's Paradise Lost or 
Milton's Minor Poems; Home Reading, selected. Second 
semester — 1, English Literature, Newcomer; 2, Burke's 
Conciliation with the American Colonies; 3, Tennyson's 
The Princess or Tennyson's Idylls of the King; 4, Ruskin's 
Sesame and Lilies. 

HISTORY 

The course in History is now arranged to conform to 
the recommendations of the Committee of Seven of the 
American Historical Association. 

Besides the culture value of history, it is to be re- 
membered that it is the study which furnishes the students 
the ideals of character which lead to the highest moral 
growth. The student should thoroughly understand the 
institutional life of the people studied. 

The purposes of history in the Academy are as follows : 

First — The development of moral character. History 
as the study of institutional life and of character teaches 
us to watch the progress of humanity in the rise and fall 
of nations. Success or failure in national life or in the 
life of a person will cause us to adopt for ourselves and our 
country that which has proven of excellent worth. History 
helps us to avoid the mistakes of other people and nations, 



— n — 



Second — The teaching of patriotism and the broaden- 
ing of our interests and sympathies. While we wish to 
be familiar with our own government and national char- 
acter we must recognize the broad principle of the univer- 
sal brotherhood of men. 

Third — The development of our powers of judgment. 
It is here that we especially study the relation between 
cause and ell'ect. Every statesman has been a studeut of 
history. In studying the problems of life which have con- 
fronted other people we are greatly aided in the practical 
solution of the life problems of to-day. 

Fourth — The acquirement of useful facts. This, 
though generally considered of most importance, is in 
fact but a subordinate purpose iu the study of history. 

Fifth — The gaining of a broad and practical general 
culture. The work consists of a study of Ancient History 
in the second year ; a special study of Medieval and Modern 
History in the third year: of English History in the third 
year; U. S. History and Civil Government in the fourth 
vear. 

MATHEMATICS 

The aim in this study is to introduce the student to 
mathematical methods and develop iu him the power to 
reason clearly and accurately on any given problem. Al- 
gebra is studied throughout the first year of the high school 
and the first half of the second \ ear ; Geometry during the 
last half of the second year and through the third year. 
A great, deal of supplementary work is given in Algebra, 
and original exercises are introduced as much as possible 
in Geometry. Arithmetic is au elective study. 



— 12 — 



LATIN 



There is no subject in the Academy which has greater 
disciplinary value to the pupil than the study of Latin. 
It trains and strengthens the memory, cultivates and 
quickens the perception, and develops habits of ready, 
accurate and sound thinking. 

A very large per cent, of all the words used in the 
dictionary will be of Latin origin, therefore some knowl- 
edge of this subject is absolutely necessary for a correct 
understanding of our own English language. It gives us a 
key to a quicker understanding of all that we read or hear. 
It is essential to all who are to continue the work in col- 
lege. It is helpful to every professional man. It will give 
us a greater appreciation of the Latin writers and speak- 
ers. It increases our general culture and contributes to 
our broader discipline. 

The College Preparatory Course is required of all who 
expect to attend college. In special cases, to fit the stu- 
dent for college, equivalent subjects may be substituted. 

SCIENCE 

The Academy is supplied with sufficient apparatus to 
be a valuable aid in the study of natural sciences. In 
Physics the subject is illustrated by many simple pieces of 
apparatus, besides the air pump, electrical machine, bat- 
teries, etc. Geology and Mineralogy are illustrated by a 
collection of more than twelve hundred specimens, pre- 
sented to the Academy by the Alumni. Iu Zoology and 
Botany, animals and plants are studied from nature, and 
systems of classification are made prominent. In all the 
sciences objects are used as much as possible. 



— 13- 



The following are the purposes in Science work: 

First — To interest the pupil in theobservation of nature. 

Second — To develop the power of reasoning through 
the original investigation of the truths of nature. 

Third — To give a practical knowledge of the elemen- 
tary principles of those sciences which are now, in a great 
measure, causing our rapid progress in the civilization of 
the world. 

COURSE IN MUSIC 

Vocal and instrumental , music will be taught by an 
experienced teacher. 

In the beginning course, students who have known 
nothing of music will be taught to read readily and sing 
ordinary church music. Advance work will be given to 
prepare students to form and conduct chorus classes and 
to teach music in the public schools. 

Excellent opportunity will be offered to all students 
who wish to take special courses in instrumental music. 

GENERAL ITEMS 

The government of the school is based upon the idea 
that manhood is more than scholarship ; that self-respect 
and self-control on the part of a student are important 
factors in the formation of character. Greater stress is 
laid upon the thoroughness of instruction and accuracy of 
knowledge than upon rapidity of advancement. 

For many years the health of students has been uni- 
formly good. There is probably no better location in the 
State in this respect. 

The Friends and Methodists both hold religious ser- 
vices on the Sabbath and each maintains a Sabbath school. 



— 14 — 



Meetings of the Young People's Society of Christian En- 
deavor and the Epworth League are held every Sabbath 
evening, and students are welcome to their meetings and 
membership. 

A sufficient number of teachers is constantly employed 
so that large classes may be avoided, and students may re- 
ceive personal attention during the recitation. 

Expenses are as low as at any other school affording 
equal advantages. 

The managers of the school are very careful to make 
this an institution in which students who are away from 
home and its restraints will be surrounded by good, moral 
influences, and in this they have the co-operation of the 
citizens of the village. There are no beer, liquor or bil- 
liard saloons in the village. 

No student whose influence is known to have a cor- 
rupting tendency will be retained in the school. 

DIPLOMAS 

Students whose conduct is exemplary, and who com- 
plete the course of study and prepare and deliver a suita- 
ble literary production, will be furnished a diploma, 
signed by the instructors and the President and Secretary 
of the Board of Trustees. To receive a diploma a student 
should be in attendance at the Academy one year, except 
when special arrangements are made with the Superin- 
tendent and Board of Trustees. 

LECTURES 

Students have the opportunity to hear good lectures 
at small expense. Addresses on various subjects are given 
during the year. 

- 15 - 



LITERARY EXERCISES 

Literary exercises may be required of all students in 
all grades, both in class work and before the public. Care 
is used that students may learn the art of composition and 
public delivery. Essays and declamations are a part of 
the regular school work in the department of oratory. 

LIBRARIES 

Five sets of encyclopedias are in the school rooms, and 
these, with the dictionaries and numerous reference books, 
are for the free use of all. There is a large library in 
connection with the school, which comprises about three 
thousand volumes. 



TEXTS USED DURING THE YEAR 

First Latin Collar and Daniel 

Classics - '. Various Texts 

English Selections 

Rhetoric 

English Literature Newcomer 

Algebra Wells 

Geometry Wentworth 

Physical Geography Davis 

Physics. _\ Milligan and Gale 

Chemistry Cooley 

Astronomy Steel-Todd 

Botany Bailey 

Psychology Halleck 

English History Wrong 

Civics Fiske 

Political Economy — Walker 

U. S. History 

Grammar Wisely 

Physioiocry Macy and Norris 

Ancient History West 

Modern History Myers 

American Literature Newcomer 

Grammar Latin Bennett 

Ca?sar -Bennett 

Cicero „ Bennett 

Vergil ; Bennett 

— 16 — 



EXPENSES 



RATES OF TUITION 

Academic classes for each study $1.00 per month 

Academic classes for two or more studies, 2.00 per month 
Normal classes for each study. 1.00 per month 

Students who enter at irregular times will be charged 
full tuition for the term in case they complete the term's 
work in such manner as to receive credit toward the diploma. 

Normal students and others who do not expect to earn 
credit in the regular course will be charged only for the 
time of actual enrollment in the classes. 

Occasionally those who are especially strong are per- 
mitted to earn credits by outside studv under the sujier- 
vision of the teachers. For such credits as these one-half 
the regular tuition will be charged. 

Tuition is due at the opening of each term, and settle- 
ment should be made with the Superintendent or the 
Treasurer of the Board of Trustees. Students will receive 
no credit for their work uutil the tuition is paid. 

BOARDING. 

The citizens of Spiceland have always given the stu- 
dents a hearty welcome by receiving them into their homes. 
The cost of boarding and rooms in private families where 
everything is furnished can be had for $2.50 to $3.00 a 
week. Rooms, both furnished and unfurnished, can be 
had from 25 to 50 cents a week, and table board of excel- 
lent quality at the rate of $2.00 to $2.50 for the full week. 

Thus persons who may live near enough to go home at 
the end of each week and who wish to economize, may re- 
duce the cost of living to a very small sum. 



-17- 



LIST OF STUDENTS 



SENIORS 



Alf, Herschel 


McLean, Clifford 


Burcham, Clara 


McDauiel, Baul 


Chandler, Ethel 


Redic, Vida 


Delon, Loma 


Reese, Hazel 


Hardin, Margaret 


Sidwell, Bessie 


Julian, Ruby 


Seaford, Mary 


Kennard, Everett 


i Swindell, Edna 


Kirkham, Glen 


Wilson, Lucile 


Land, Elba 




JUNIORS 


Arnold, Beula 


Reese, Hoyt 


Butler, Loren 


Reese, Harry 


Hays, Walter 


McGrady, James 


Hudelson, Ruth 


Simmons, Minnie 


Jarrett, Ada 


Smith, Margaret 


Mollitt, Griffin 


Teeter, Clayton 


Osborn, Alma 


Williams, Ross 


Bennington, Elgar 


Wilson, Berry 


SOBHOMORES 


Antrim, Mary 


Sidwell, Lulu 


Hendricks, Marie 


Smith, William 


Henshaw, Bernice 


Stigleman, Edith 


Kiser, Minnie 


Taylor, Leanna 


Markle, Andrew 


Test, Ralph 


Moffitt, Ruth 


Wilson, Kerney 


Seaford, Hazel 


Lines, Leetus 


FRESHMEN 


Biugaman, Walter 


Hoffman, Clarence 


Brown, Roy 


Luelleu, Fred 



Cochran, Hazel 
Cochran, Ruba 
Evans, Ralph 
Fields, Decil 
Grim, Elmer 
Hall, Arthur 
Harvey, Howard 
Harvey, Ruth 

Ballard, Addia 
Brandy, Russell 
Hays, Nellie 
Hopper, George 
King, Hilliard 
Martin, Ira 



Moffitt, Bessie 
Moffitt, Ethyle 
Bainter, Mira 
Bennington, Everett 
Toohey, Erma 
Welborne, Umba 
Williams, Ernestine 



IRREGULAR 



Osborn, Edgar 
Osborn, Mary 
Pleas, Ernest 
Reese, Charlie 
Stewart, Carl 



ALUMNI 



OFFICERS FOR 1908-1909 

President Russell Wright 

Vice-President Lena Rayl 

Secretary Roscoe Edwards 

Treasurer.. Homer Henley 

( ... Pearl Symons 

Executive Committee ■] Irene Bell 

( Arthur Hudelson 

Orator Charles Smith 

Vice-Orator Belle Chambers Baily 

Historian Isadore Hall Wilson 

Vice-Historian _. Alonzo C. Hodson 



1870 

*Eli U. Cook 

John J. Stubbs Omaha, Neb 



* Deceased. 

— 19 



1871 

♦Walter D. Jones 

*AIvin H. Jenkins • 

*I. Macy Good """"I™*.". " 

C R - Dixon - Lawrence, Kan 

R. G. Boone _ — -Yonkers, N. Y. 

Dallas Sisson - - .Spiceland 

Mary Ballenger (Barnard) New Castle 

Louisa Wickersham Lewisville, R. F. D. i 

Lida Edwards (Saint).... New Castle 

1872- 

Lindley H. Johnson.. .". ... Dunreith 

*David Henley. 

"Jacob Hill 

Henry W. Painter New Castle, R. F. D. i 

Robert G. Mitchell Pacific Grove, Cal 

1873 

♦Sadie D. Talbert (Wrigbtl 

Aaron B. Bell ..Springtown, Ark 

*J. Tilman Hutchins 

John Pennington .Ypsilanti, Mich., R. F. D. i 

Mary Stubbs (Painter) ...New Castle, R. F. D. I 

Nathan Williams ._ Oswego, Kan 

1874 

Alice Coffin (Russell).... New York City 

Elvira Spencer (Harold) Indianapolis 

J. P. Edwards Knightstown 

William S. Moffett. _ Kennard 

Edwin O. Kennard Pasadena, Cal 

Nathan Kosenberger.... Muscatine, Iowa. 

W. E. Jackson.. _ Knightstown 

D - c - Mitchell Spiceland 

1875 

W.W.Gregg Spiceland 

William Pidgeon Bloomington 

Irvin Stanley Westfield 

^Deceased. 

— 20 — 



1877 

Milton Roberts . Linnville, Iowa 

1878 

S. Ella Bogue (Dogget) _ Danville, Va 

Belle Chambers (Baily) New Castle /? ' 

J. Pinkney Mitchell.. Fresno, Cal 

Thomas Mitchell Knightstown 

Flora Moore (Brady) Indianapolis 

John O. Reed Ann Arbor, Mich 

♦William Seaford 

Fannie Thornburg (Parsons) Oak Park, 111 

1879 , r 

J. B. Buck Muncie / N 'S 

Carrie Goodwin (Jeffrey) '. .New Castle 

Thomas Newlin Whittier, Cal 

1880 

J. Edgar Cloud _ Lafpyette 

Wm. N. Lamb San Francisco, Cal 

Mattie Lamb Outland Amboy 

Ada Grace Murphy Chattanooga, Tenn 

Ida May Roberts ^Matehuala, Mexico 

Emma Belle Roberts Westfieid 

Frank Symons Portland, Me 

Lamira Trueblood (Kellum) Camby 

1881 

Oscar R. Baker Winchester 

♦Corrie Bogue 

Minnie Benedict ( Blankenship) Paragon 

Carrie Unthank (Kellum) Indianapolis 

♦Jessie Strattan 

1882 

♦Arthgr H. Baily 

J. New Barnard.. 

Harriet Bogue (Newlin) Indianapolis 

Hattie E. Dickinson Spiceland 

Charles Newlin Irvington 

f Deceased. 

— 21 — 



1883 

Anna Hudelson (Foster) Washington, D. C. 

Ry land Katliff Danville 

Julia Stafford (Newby) New Castle, R. F. D. 2 

Emily \Veek9 Middletown, R. F D. I 

1884 

*Cora Kirk 

Ella Stratton (Hodson) New Castle, R. F. D. 4 

^ Virginia Griffin (Cory) Dunreith 

Isadore Hall (Wilson). Spiceland 

William Julian — Hastings, Neb 

Charles Newby Converse 

1885 

Mary L. Brown (Pennington) Spiceland 

Alfred V. King ...Mt. Vernon, 111 

Oliver C. Steele Spiceland 

1886 

L Winnie Baily (Clement) Haddonfield, N.J 

Mattie £. Brown . _ Daytona, Fla 

Richard Broadbent Elwood 

Elbert Griffin ... Elwood 

Alonzn C. Hodson New Castle, R. F. D. 4 

*John L. McNew 

1887 

Herbert T. Baily _'. Spiceland 

Clarence H. Beard New Castle 

Anna K. Bogue (Shaffer) Benton Harbor, Mich 

Lindley Compton , Tomah, Wis 

Elizabeth S. Hiatt (Genau) Omaha, Neb 

Abram Miller Greensburg 

Bert Smith Zionsville 

1888 

Rhoda Ballenger (Cunningham) Indianapolis 

^Hannah Brown (Stribbing) Payton, Iowa 

Oryntha Brown (Jester) Payton, Iowa 

*Jessie Butler 

* Deceased. 

— 22 — 



Clara G. Edwards (Knight) St. Louis, Mo 

John C. Cook ...New Castle, R. F. D. 2 

Elva Elliott (Compton) Tomah, Wis 

Achsah E. Ratcliff New Castle 

H. H. Rayl Muncie 

Charles Stubbs Indianapolis 

J. A. Greenstreet - New Castle 

H. H. Ratcliff ...Mt. Morris. Ill 

1889 

Laura Benedict... - Indianapolis 

Blanch Braddock (McNew)... Greenfield 

Frank Copeland Dunreith 

Estella Deem (Kennedy) Spiceland 

♦Lawrence Gardner 

Gertrude Gordon (Genaux). ...Spiceland 

Sue Griffin (Evans) Spiceland 

Otis Stubbs Lewisville, R. F. D 

Mary While Pasadena, Cal 

18!)U 

L. Pitta Butler Lewisville R. F. D 

Elmer Deem ... ..Frankfort 

Edwin B. Ratcliff Spiceland 

Bennie Strntton New Castle, R. F. D. 1 

S. E. Stubbs Wilkinson 

1891 

Ethel E. Copeland (Lee) Meadville, Pa 

Louie Edmundson (Poe) Charlottesville 

Maurine Gardner (Kern); Cadiz ) 

Charles N. Hardy ._ Markleviile 

Alice Hiatt (Copeland) Cincinnati, O 

Ernest Sis^on Greenfield 

Alfred H. Symons Fort Yeats, North Dakota 

Mary M Teas - . Centerville 

Charles Titus- —Warrington 

Herbert D. Woodard Fountain City 

* Deceased. 

— 23 - 



1892 

Jesse S. Baily. Silverton, Col 

Clara Brown _. Earlham, Ind 

Walter T. Evans Canby, Minn 

John B. Greenstreet Lewisville, R. F. D. 

Winnie Hinshaw (Milligan) _ Winchester 

David M. Kemp ..Kempton 

Alice Lawrence _ Spiceiand 

Estella Symons Minneapolis, Minn 

Alvin Ulrich Greensboro 

Oscar Bogue _ _ Spiceiand 

Estella Charles... Indianapolis 

Floy Hill Pasadena, Cal 

Arthur Holloway Oskaloosa, Iowa 

Leora Jessup (Parker) Westland 

John Miller New Castle 

Olen Payne... .New Castle 

Lena Rayle.. ...Spiceiand 

George Smith Knightstown 

Orville White Joplin, Mo 

1894 

Minnie Black (Moore) Chicago, III 

Bessie I. Brown Daytona, Fla 

Clarence V. Hall New Castle 

Horace Hardy... Markleville 

Ida holloway (Kenworthy) _ Richmond 

Arlie Hood New Castle 

Bertha Jessup Clay Center, Neb 

Elma Lawrence ..Spiceiand 

Maud M. Shaffer (Payne New Castle 

Frank Pitts Indianapolis 

Oscar F. Symons ..Minneapolis, Minn 

1895 

Clarence Painter Osawatomie, Kan 

Mabel Wright (Garr) Kokomo 



— 24 — 



Edgar Cox Clarkton, N C. 

♦Nellie Ratliff - 

Howard Henley Tuttle, Okla 

Maud Wildman (Evans) Philadelphia, Pa 

Frank Hudelson - Mays 

*Pearl Moffett (Wood). 

189G 

Cora Hudson (Bogue) Spiceiand 

Clara White (Wildman) — .Selma, O 

Elsie Hudelson. Greenfield 

Anna Morris — Wabash 

Pearl M. James (Tweedy) Wabash 

Mabel Newby (Hood) New Castle 

W. J. Carson Chicago 

Nora Griffin (Beach) New Castle 

Theresa Wildman. Philadelphia, Pa 

Roscoe Edwards Mooreland 

1897 

Leoti Applegate (Coffin) Spiceiand 

Elva M. Hudson (Hall) Spiceiand 

Lois M. Henley + Indianapolis 

♦Fanny Hayes 

Floy H ud el son 4 Greenfield 

Josie B. Harlan (Weatherman) ..Dana 

Jessie Leaky (Hiatt) New Lisbon 

Pearl Millikan (Hardy) Markleville 

Ethel Rifner (Newby).. Englewood, Kan 

Mayme Stafford (Applegate) Spiceiand 

Clyde Sisson Spiceiand 

Minnie Stratton (Stafford) New Castle, R. F. D. i 

Charles Smith ..Boston, Mass 

*lrving White.... 

1898 

Clifford Applegate __ Spiceiand 

James Holtsclaw Spiceiand 

'Deceased. 

-25- 



Bavis Nay _ Springport 

Emory Ratcliff... __ Madison, Wis 

Gertrude Seaford Spiceland 

Pear! Symons ...Spiceland 

Lelia Smith (Rice) ....Spencer, O 

Charles A. Beard New York N. Y 

Merhtt Stafford _ Westland 

Cora Smith _ Spiceland 

Walter Painter.. Upland 

Bertha Charles Marlem, Mont 

Ernest Shockley Angora 

Elsie Shockley (Lockridge) Bloomington 

1899 

Bessie Haisley Spiceland 

Bertha O. Lawrence. ....Oskaloosa, Iowa 

Florence O. Macy Metamoris, Mexico 

Earl Moffett Knightstown, R. F. D. 2 

Walter T. Pearce New Castle, R. F. D. 2 

Orabell Shaffer (Bell) New Castle, R. F. D. 2 

19(10 

Ethel Applegate Spiceland 

Edgar Bazzle New Castle 

Susan Benedict (Nay) Springport 

Cora Charles (Carson) Logansport 

Connie Griffin Ogden 

David \V. Gordon Indianapolis 

Guy H. Hall New Lisbon 

Clyde Kennedy , Richmond 

Clarence Macy...^.,-.,'-J-'j. v tii.-.r^., Tr - Hot Springs, S. Dak 

Everest Macy Gainesville, Fla 

Carroll Mills Lewisville, R. F. D 

Cecil Newby Englewood, Kan 

♦Jeanette Rifner 

Pernia Thornburg (Griffin) Clermont, 111 

John R. Thompson Sulphur Springs 

1901 

Ira E. Bell New Castle, R. F. D. 2 



— 26- 



« 



Bertha E. Butler (Ballard) Lewisville 

Raymond Byrket El wood 

Jennie Compton (Cope) Dunreith 

Everett Cope. Dunreith 

Deborah Edwards Knightstown, R. F. D 

Ethel Edwards (Kramein) .Bloomington, 111 

Lillian H.Hayes Dunreith 

Walter B. Harvey Dunreith 

John R. Hinshaw Greensboro 

Everett Macy . Lewisville, R, F. D 

Georgia Millikan (Hardy)...' J.J^jsl. r Pendleton 

Jennie E. Millikaa ..fJtl.'J. iJ.'.-Ui L -)-■[-/.: .'.I... Spiceland 

Homer E. Nil gen C Lewisville 

Cora E. Risk _ Spiceland 

Robert A Roberts 1 Bloomington 

Grace E„ Stewart (Johnson) New Castle, R. F. D 

Russell L. Wright Greensboro 

Walter C. Wilson , ...St. Cloud, Minn 

191)2 

Harlev Anderson Spiceland 

Jessie Baily Crestview, Tenn 

Mary Butler Spiceland 

Walter Byers Knightstown, R. F. D. 2 

Jennie Kirk Spiceland 

Guerney Maple Lewisville 

Manning Smith Philadelphia 

Rena Thomas Richmond 

Retta Thomas Fountain City 

Russell Wilson St Cloud, Minn 

India Yost (Cook ) . _, ...Sulphur Springs 

Rilla Bartlett Lewisville 

Nellie Beckett Spiceland 

Perrin Holt Markleville 

Arthur Johnson Lewisville 

Carl Newby Gate, Ok lahoma 

Rupert Redic .El Paso, Texas 



— 27 - 



Ralph Stubbs. 
Walter Wright 



.. Spiceland 
Indianapolis 



1904 

Elsie Bell... _ Spiceland 

Josephine Beeson . Spiceland 

Will Benedict -- Springport 

Lawrence Bridges Markleville 

Warren Edwards Knightstown, R F. D 

Irl Evans. Mt. Summit 

Jessie Gordon.. Spiceland 

Ruth Harvey Dunreith 

Hazel Heacock (Yockey) - New Castle 

Homer Henley Tuttie.Okla 

Claire Hoover (May) - .Shirley 

Barton Jones Spiceland 

Belva Jordan (Coffin) ..Spiceland 

Guy May Shirley 

Pansy Newby Lewisville 

Anna Painter New Castle, R. F. D 

Clara Patterson (Rothrock) New Castle, R. F. D 

Lois Pitts - Morristown, R. F. D 

Wendell Pitts ...Morristown, R. F. D 

Lawrence Reeves -- Knightstown 

Robert Reeves Wilkinson 

Etta Rifner (Parker) - Hickory, N. C 

John Rogers Mooreland 

Herbert Seaford .Spiceland 

Ralph Silver --- Knightstown 

Bernetha Smith .Spiceland 

Charles Veach - -- Mt- Summit 

Ethel Wright (Hershaur) ...Dunreith 

Harold Yockey New Castle 

1905 

Elsie Anderson New Castle 

Walttr P.randy Spiceland 

Raymond Duke Indianapolis 

— 28 — 



Alexander Gano New Castle, R. F. D. 

Oran Griffin Indianapolis 

Ruth Gardner — New Castle, R. F. D. 1 

Elva Kennard Knightstown, R. R. 2 

Aura Lane Spiceland 

Edward Pope New Castle, R. F. D. 6 

Jessie Reece Indianapolis 

Ruby Reeves Knightstown 

Anna Reeves Wilkinson, R. 2 

*Arthur Rifner 

Arden Stubbs Spiceland 

Everett Test Spiceland 

Amy Thomas .Willow 

Paul Wilson ...Knightstown R. i 

1906 

Charles Bundy Muncie 

Walter Bundy Spiceland 

Arthur Hudelson — Spiceland 

Hazel Hudelson.. Dunreith 

Edna Kellar. ._ ..Lewisville 

Frances Nugen Dunreith 

Myron Painter Spiceland 

Edna Rogers Mooreland 

Otis Shaffer Richmond 

Maud Simmons Wilkinson 

Grover VanDine Shirley 

Orville Wright Spiceland 

1907 

Hazel Bartlett Lewisville 

Irene Bell C- r -Z— Spiceland 

Bertha Bowers \J. .Terre Haute 

Ruby McDaniel _~ _ Knightstown R. F. D. 3 

Levinus Painter New Castle R. F. D. 

Howard Seaford Spiceland 

Cle nna Smith . ... Lewisville 

llassel Williams .Muncie 

* Deceased. 

- 29 — 




1909 - 1910 

SPICELAND ACADEMY 

. SPICELAND, INDIANA 



(Knightstown Banner Print) 



FACULTY AND CALENDAR 

For "the Academic Year 1910-1911 



INSTRUCTORS 

\ 

Homer H. Cooper, A. M., Superintendent 
History and Science 

Emma Kendall, A. B. 
Latin and English 

Laura Doan, A. B. 
Mathematics and Science 



Drawing 



Music 



CALENDAR 



1910 

Fall Term begins Tuesday, September 13 
Fall Term ends Thursday, December 22 

1911 

Winter Term begins Tuesday, January 3 
Winter Term ends P'riday, March 17 
Spring Term begins Tuesday, March 28 
Commencement, Friday, June 2 

— 3 — 



BOARD OF TRUSTEES 



Edwin B. Ratcliff, President 

S. B. Lane, Secretary and Treasurer 

Alvin Painter 

Arthur \V. Osborn 

Seth C. Svmons 

Chaki.es B. Harvey 



INSTRUCTORS 
Academic Year 1909-1910 



Homer H. COOPER, A. M., Superintendent 
History and Science 

Ethel H. Publow 
Mathematics and Science 

Emma Kendall, A. B, 
Latin and English 

Mary Dickenson 
Drawing 

Rev. J. Stookey 
Music 



— 4 — 



HISTORY 

PICELAND ACADEMY is the oldest academy in 
charge of the Friends in Indiana. It was chartered 
as an academy in 1870, but its history as a Friends' 
school extends over a period of eighty years. It is 
under the control of the Spiceland Monthly Meeting, by 
which body the Board of Trustees is appointed. The 
teachers are selected by the Trustees. While the school 
is under denominational control, it is not sectarian in the 
least; its foundation rests upon Christian culture; it has 
been kept under strong Christian influences, and its pur- 
pose is to develop practical, earnest, and active Christian 
mauhood and womanhood. 

The first class graduated in 1870. The Alumni Asso- 
ciation now enrolls about three hundred seventy-five. 
About three thousand live hundred students have received 
instruction in the school since its organization as an 
academy. 

LOCATION 




Spiceland Academy is located in the beautiful town of 



Spiceland, Indiana, in the southern part of Henry county, 
on the Lake Erie & Western railroad, two miles north of 
Dunreith, on the Pennsylvania railroad. The buildings 
are situated in the midst of a beautiful grove, adjoining 
which is a large campus, well adapted to athletic sports. 
The interurban street-car line gives connections with sur- 
rounding cities. 

ENTRANCE 

Students may enter at any time, but students coming 
from other schools are required to bring certificates stating 
their literary and moral standing, in the absence of ap- 
proved certificate, examinations will be held and students 
classified accordingly. Classes in Grammar School 
branches are maintained as demand may justify, afford- 
ing opportunity for preparatory work to students who may 
not l>e eligible to regular academic standing. 

The conditions for admission to the First Year class 
are the same as for entrance to the public high schools of 
this State. 

In general, a graduate from non-commissioned high 
schools of this county. can enter the Academy with credit 
for the number of months' work he has studied in his 
home school wherein the work is up to the standard of the 
commissioned high school. 

THE COURSE OF STUDY IN FOUR YEARS. 

The Academy course of study has been arranged with 
two purposes in view : 



- 6 - 



First — It is prepared to conform to the needs and de- 
sires of all students who may not have the opportunity to 
pursue a college course, but who desire a practical educa- 
tion which will prepare them to lead an active and suc- 
cessful life. 

Second — It is arranged to enable students to make the 
necessary preparation for admission in college without 
examination. 

THE ENGLISH COURSE 

The completion of the English Course will entitle one 
to a certificate of credit. It is intended for those who 
have no expectation of attending college, but who wish to 
be prepared as well as possible for their work in life. 

It is to be understood that the College Preparatory 
Course is the one required for college entrance require- 
ments. 

BIBLE STUDY 

The study of the Bible is considered of so much im- 
portance that arrangements have been made by which it 
will be taught in the Academy. The subject will be made 
an elective one. Credit will be given as in other studies. 
This will be one of the most valuable studies in the course 
and it is hoped many will take advantage of the work. 

STATE CERTIFICATE OF EQUIVALENCY 

The State Board of Education has given the Academy 
a Certificate of Equivalency. This enables the graduates 
to enter any college in the State without an examination. 



OUTLINE OF COURSE OF STUDY 



College Preparatory 

Latin Beginning 
English I 
Algebra 
*Botany 

Latin Beginning 
English I 
Algebra 
Botany 

Plane Geometry 
English II 
Caesar 

Ancient History 

Plane Geometry 
English II 
Caesar 

Ancient History 

♦English III 

Algebra 

Physics 

Cicero 
♦Modern History 

English III 
Solid Geometry 
Physics 
Cicero 
♦Modern History 



FIRST YEAR 
First Semester 



Second Semester 



SECOND YEAR 
First Semester 



Second Semester 



JUNIOR 
First Semester 



Second Semester 



SENIOR 
First Semester 



English 
Latin Beginning 
English I 
Algebra 
♦Botany 

Latin Beginning 
English I 
Algebra 
Botany 

Algebra 
English II 
Ciesar 

Ancient History 

Algebra 
English II 
Caesar 

Ancient History 

♦English III 

Plane Geometry 

Physics 
♦Agriculture 

Modern History 

♦English III 
♦Bible Study 

Physics 
♦Agriculture 

Modern History 



English IV 
♦Physical Geography 

Vergil 
♦United States History 
♦Arithmetic, Commercial 

Second Semester 

English IV 
Physical Geography 
Elect 

♦United States History 

♦Arithmetic, Commercial 

■^Subjects marked with a star are elective. In pi 
lowing elective subjects may be taken : Arithmetic, 
History, English III, Botany, United States History 
Vergil, Music, Drawing, and special elective. 



English IV 

Physical Geography 
♦Arithmetic 
♦United States History 

Commercial Arithmetic 

English IV 

Physical Geography 
♦Arithmetic 
♦United States History' 

Commercial Arithmetic 
ace of those marked, the fol- 
I'hyslcal Geography, English 
, Bible Study, Solid (teometry, 



Advanced classes in any of the lines of study will be 
formed whenever a sufficient number of pupils desire the 
higher work. The diploma of the Academy will admit the 
student to any of the colleges in Indiana or of other States 
without entrance examinations. 

Higher classes in any subject or classes in subjects not 
offered will be formed whenever there is sufficient demand, 
and tuition will be charged, one dollar per month for each 
study. Satisfactory work in these studies may be substi- 
tuted for work in regular course at the discretion of the 
Superintendent. 

The course of study makes provision for a number of 
electives, thus giving the student an opportunity to select 
work along the line of his preference. The thirty-two 
credits required for graduation are distributed among the 
departments as follows : Latin, seven ; English, six; His- 
tory, two; Mathematics, six ; Science, two ; Elective, nine. 

It is especially urged that all pupils take the regular 
College Preparatory Course of study, and after graduation 
attend college, if possible. 

Increased advantages are offered in the arrangements 
made to take elective work in the following departments : 
Drawing, Music, and Elocution and Oratory. 

ENGLISH 

I. English Composition 1 

The aim of this course is to give the student a practi- 
cal knowledge in the principles of English composition. 
Every student should be able to use correctly his own lan- 
guage both in writing and in speaking. Two recitations 



- 9 — 



per week are given in this study during each year of the 
Academic course. The student is required to write at 
least one short theme each week. This theme is then dis- 
cussed by the class and carefully criticized by the teacher. 

1st year — Composition and Grammar. 
2nd year — Composition and Rhetoric. 
3rd year — Composition and Rhetoric. 
4th year — Term Essays and Thesis. 

II. English Literature. 

The purpose of this course is to create an interest in 
literature for its own sake and to increase the culture of 
the student by developing a love for the best in thought 
and style. This can be done only by a thorough study of 
the masterpieces of the most important English and Amer- 
ican writers. It is desired to emphasize that the reading 
of the following selections does not constitute the proper 
study of literature. The time element is important. To 
receive credil for a year's work requires nine months' 
time under the careful supervision of an experienced 
teacher. 

First Year — First semester. 1, Longfellow's Poems; 
2, Irving's Sketch Book; 3, Whittier's Poems; 4, Cooper's 
Last of the Mohicans; Home Reading, Pilgrims Progress. 
Second semester — 1, Lowell's Poems; 2, Hawthorne's Won- 
der Rook; 3, Ancient Mariner and Deserted Village; 4, 
Shakespeare, selected; Home Reading, Christmas Carol, 
A Man Without A Country. 

Second Year — First semester. 1, Scott's Ivanhoe; 2, 
Lady of thy bake; 3, Sit Roger de Coverley ; Home Lead- 



— 10 - 



ing, Lorua Doone. Second Semester — 1, Macaulay's Life 
of Johnson; 2, Silas Marner; 3, Merchant of Venice; 
Home Reading, selected. . 

Third Year — First semester. 1, Abernethy's Ameri- 
can Literature; 2, Washington's Farewell Address; 3, 
Webster's Bunker Hill Oration ; 4, Poe's Poems and Prose ; 
Home Reading, The Crisis. Second semester — 1, Emmer- 
son's Essays; 2, Lowell's Poems : 3, Shakespeare, selected. 

Fourth Year — First semester. 1, English Literature, 
Newcomer; 2, Hamlet and Macbeth; 3, Milton's Poems; 
Home Reading, selected. Second semester — 1, Burke's 
Conciliation with the American Colonies; 2, Fal^rave, 
Book IV; ;j, Tennyson's Foems; Home Reading, selected. 

HISTORY 

The course in History is now arranged to conform to 
the recommendations of the Committee of Seven of the 
American Historical Association. 

Besides the culture value of history, it is to be re- 
membered that it is the study which furnishes the stu- 
dents the ideals of character which lead to the highest 
moral growth. The student should thoroughly understaud 
the institutional life of the people studied. 

The purposes of history in the Academy are as follows : 

First — The development of moral character. History 
as the study of institutional life and of character teaches 
us to watch the progress of humanity in the rise and fall 
of nations. Success or failure in national life or in the 
life of a person will cause us to adopt for ourselves and our 
country that which lias proven of excellent worth. History 



— n — 



helps us to avoid the mistakes of other people and nations. 

Second — The teaching of patriotism and the broaden- 
ing of our interests and sympathies. While we wish to 
be familiar with our own government and national char- 
acter, we must recognize the broad principle of the uni- 
versal brotherhood of men. 

Third — The development of our powers of judgment. 
It is here that we especially study the relation between 
cause and effect. Every statesman has been a student of 
history. In studying the problems of life which have con- 
fronted other people we are greatly aided in the practical 
solution of the life problems of today. 

Fourth — The acquirement of useful facts. This, though 
generally considered of most importance, is in fact but a 
subordinate purpose in the study of history. 

Fifth — The gaining of a broad and practical general 
culture. The work consists of a study of Ancient History 
in the second year; a special study of Medieval and Mod- 
ern History in the third year; of English History in the 
third year; United States History and Civil Government 
in the fourth year. 

MATHEMATICS 

The aim in this study is to introduce the student to 
mathematical methods and develop in him the power to 
reason clearly and accurately on any given problem. Al- 
gebra is studied throughout the first year of the high school A 
and the first half of the third year; Geometry during the 
second year and through the last half of the third year. 
A great deal of supplementary work is given in Algebra, 



— 12 — 



and original exercises are introduced as much as possible 
in Geometry. Arithmetic is an elective study. 

LATIN 

There is no subject in the Academy which has greater 
disciplinary value to the pupil than the study of Latin. 
It trains and strengthens the memory, cultivates and 
quickens the perception, and develops habits of ready, 
accurate and sound thinking. 

A very large per cent, of all the words used in the 
dictionary will be of Latin origin, therefore some knowl- 
edge of this subject is absolutely necessary for a correct 
understanding of our own English language. It gives us 
a key to a quicker- understanding of all that we read or 
hear. It is essential to all who are to continue work in 
college. It is helpful to every professional man. It will 
give us a greater appreciation of the Latin writers and 
speakers. It increases our general culture and contributes 
to our broader discipline. 

The College Preparatory Course is required of all who 
expect to attend college. In special cases, to fit the stu- 
dent for college, equivalent subjects may be substituted. 

SCIENCE 

The Academy is supplied with sufficient apparatus to 
be a valuable aid in the study of natural sciences. In 
Physics the subject is illustrated by many simple pieces 
of apparatus, besides the air pump, electrical machine, 
batteries, etc. Geology and Mineralogy are illustrated by 
a collection of more than twelve hundred specimens, pre- 



— 13 — 



sented to the Academy by the Alumni. In Zoology and 
Botany, animals and plants are studied from nature, and 
stystems of classification are made prominent. In all the 
sciences objects are used as much as possible. ^ 

The following are the purposes in science work : 

First— To interest the pupil in the observationof nature. 

Second— To develop the power of reasoning through 
the original investigation of the truths of nature. 

Third— To give a practical knowledge of the elemen- 
tary principles of those sciences which are now, in a great 
measure, causing our rapid progress in the civilization of 
the world. 

COUPSE IN MUSIC 

A r ocal and instrumental music will be taught by an 
experienced teacher. 

In the beginning course, students who have known 
nothing of music will be taught to read readily and sing 
ordinary church music. Advance work will be given to 
prepare students to form and conduct chorus classes and 
to teach music in the public schools. 

Excellent opportunity will be offered to all students 
who wish to take special courses in instrumental music. 

GENERAL ITEMS 

The government of the school is based upon the idea 
that manhood is more than scholarship; that self-respect 
and self-control on the part of a student are important » 
factors in tho formation of character. Greater stress is 
laid upon the thoroughness of instruction and accuracy' of 
knowledge than upon rapidity of advancement. T 



— 14 — 



For many years the health of students has been uni- 
formly good. There is probably no better location in the 
State in this respect. 

The Friends and Methodists both hold religious servi- 
ces on the Sabbath and each maintains a Sabbath school. 
Meetings of the Young People's Society of Christian En- 
deavor and the Ep worth League are held every Sabbath 
evening, and students are welcome to their meetings and 
membership. 

A sufficient number of teachers is constantly employed 
so that large classes may be avoided, and students may re- 
ceive personal attention during the recitation. 

Expenses are as low as at any other school affording 
equal advantages. 

The managers of the school are very careful to make 
this an institution in which students who are away from 
home and its restraints will be surrounded by good, moral 
inlluences, and in this they have the co-operation of the 
citizens of the village. There are no beer, liquor or bil- 
liard saloons in the village. 

No student whose influence is known to have a cor- 
rupting tendency will be retained in the school. 

DIPLOMAS 

Students whose conduct is exemplary, and who com- 
plete the course of study and prepare and deliver a suita- 
ble literary production, will be furnished a diploma, 
signed by the instructors and the President and Secretary 
of the Board of Trustees. To receive a diploma a student 
should be in attendance at the Academy one year, except 



- 15 - 



when special arrangements are made with the Superin- 
tendent and Board of Trustees. 



LECTURES 

Students have the opportunity to hear good lectures 
at small expense. Addresses ou various subjects are given 
during the year. 

LITERARY EXERCISES 

Literary exercises may be required of all students in 
all grades, both in class work and before the public. Care 
is used that students may learn the art of composition and 
public delivery. Essays and declamations are a part of 
the regular school work in the department of oratory. 

LIBRARIES 

Five sets of encyclopedias are in the school rooms, and 
these with the dictionaries and numerous reference books, 
are for the free use of all. There is a large library in 
connection with the school, which comprises about three 
thousand volumes. 



— 16 — 



TEXTS USED DURING THE YEAR 



First Latin Collar and Daniel 

Classics Various Texts 

English Selections 

Rhetoric 

English Literature Newcomer 

Algebra Slaught and Lennes 

Geometry Wentworth 

Physical Geography 1 Davis 

Physics Milligan and Gale 

Chemistry , ' Cooley 

Astronomy Steele-Todd 

Botany Bailey 

Psychology Halleck 

English History . Wrong 

Civics Fiske 

Political Economy Walker 

U. S History 

Grammar Wisely 

Physiology Macy and Norris 

Ancient History : West 

Modern History., Myers 

American Literature Abernethy 

Grammar Latin Bennett 

Caesar .= Bennett 

Cicero 1 Bennett 

Vergil Bennett 

EXPENSES 



RATES OF TUITION 

Academic classes for each study $1.00 per month 

Academic classes for two are more studies 

Special classes for each study $1.00 per month 

Students who enter at irregular times will be charged 
full tuition for the term in case they complete the term's 
work in such manner as to receive credittoward the diploma. 

Special students and others who do not expect, to earn 
credit in the regular course will be charged only for the 
time of actual enrollment in the classes. 



- 17 - 



Occasionally those who are especially strong are per- 
mitted to earn credits by outside study under the super- 
vision of the teachers. For such credits as these one-half 
the regular tuition will be charged. 

Tuition is due at the opening of each term, and settle- 
ment should be made with the Superintendent or the 
Treasurer of the Board of Trustees. Students will receive 
no credit for their work until the tuition is paid. 

BOARDING 

The citizens of Spiceland have always given the stu- 
dents a hearty welcome by receiving them into their homes. 
The cost of boarding and rooms in private families where 
everything is furnished can be had for $2.50 to $3.00 a 
week. Booms, both furnished and unfurnished, can be 
had from 25 to 50 cents a week, and table board of excel- 
lent quality at the rate of $2.00 to $2.50 for the full week. 

Thus persons who may live near enough to go home at 
the end of the week, and who wish to economize, may re- 
duce the cost of living to a very small sum. 



LIST OF STUDENTS 



SENIORS 

Antrim, Mary Moll'ett, Ruth 

Bartlett, Helen Rich, Clarence 

Cartwright, Clarence Seaford, Hazel 

Grissom, Nettie Shively, Lena 

Hendricks, Marie Smith, William 

Henshaw, Bern ice Stigleman, Edith 

Jessup, Mary Taylor, Leanna 

Kiser, Minnie Test, Ralph 

Markle, Andrew Wilson, Kerney 
May, Ruth 



- 18 - 



JUNIORS 



Brown, Roy 
Cochran, Hazel 
Cochran, Ruby 
Evans, Ralph 
Fields, Decil 
Grim, Elmer 
Harvey, Howard 
Harvey, Ruth 



Hofi'man, Clarence 
Moffitt, Ethyle 
Myers, Grace 
Fainter, Mini 
Bennington, Everett 
Shipley, Leah 
Symons, Merwin 
Williams, Ernestiue 



Brown, Russell 
Bacon, Sadie 
Baily, John 
Bell, Dorothy 
Chandler, Ralph 
Chew, Edith 
Daugherty, Edith 
Delon, Horace 
Ewing, Russell 
Hardin, Alvin 
Hays, Martha 



SOFHOMORKS 



Mills, Orpha 
Howell, Ruby 
Lane, Melissa 
Macey, Mabel 
Moll'ett, Exie 
Montgomery, Clara 
Fittsford, Susie 
Test, Rachael 
Thomas, Virginia 
Toohey, Margaret 
West, Audrey 



FRESHMEN 



Buck, Mabel 
Bundy, Marie 
Bundy, Floyd 
Butler, Addie 
Butler, Rebecca 
Draper, Jessie 
Evans, Anna 
Hall, Iris 
Hammer, Lela 
Hoclson, Georgia 
Riser, Flossie 



Macey, Esther 
Mercer, Mildred 
Miles, Mae 
Moffitt, Hazel 
Munden, Beula 
Nugen, Lilian 
Ricks, Lucile 
Sellers, Lydia 
Stanley, Staeey 
Valentene, Richard 
Wilson, Ercel 



IRREGULAR 



Gray, Wayne 



Hall, Arthur 



- i 9 — 



ALUMNI 



OFFICERS FOR 1910-1911 



President ...Henry W. Painter 

Vice President Homer Henley 

Secretary Margaret Smith 

Treasurer Clifford Applegate 

_ . . ( .... O. H. Bogue 

Executive Committee j ... Mary Antrim 

, ( — Ruth Gardner 

Orator Walter Wilson 

Vice-Orator... Orville Wright 

Historian.. _ Lois Pitts 

Vice-Historian Glen Kirkham 



Those marked (*) are deceased. 

*Eli U. Cook _ 

John J. Stubbs Omaha, Neb 

♦Walter U. Jones 

*Alvin H. Jenkins 

*I. Macy Good 

C. R. Dixon Lawrence, Kan 

R. G. Boone New York City 

Dallas Sisson.. Spiceland 

Mary Ballenger (Barnard).. New Castle 

Louisa Wickersham Lewisville, R F 1) i 

Lida Edwards (Saint).. ; New Castle 

Lindley H. Johnson.. Dunreith 

*David Henley 

*Jacob Hill.... V:lV".l'Z"'.'. 

Henry W. Painter New Castle, R F D i 

Robert G. Mitchell Pacific Grove, Cal 

— 20 — 



1873 *Sadie D. Talbert (Wright) 

Aaron B. Bell — Springtown, Ark 

*J. Tilman Hutchins '. 

John Pennington Bylralia, O 

Mary Stubbs (Painter) New Castle, R F D I 

Nathan Williams - Oswego, Kan 

1874 Alice Coffin ( Russell) New York City 

Alvira Spencer (Harold) Indianapolis 

J. P. Edwards Knightstown 

William S. Moffitt Kennard 

Edwin O. Kennard Pasadena, Cal 

Nathan Rosenberger Muscatine, Iowa 

W. E. Jackson.. Knightstown 

D. C. Mitchell... Spiceland 

1871; W.W.Gregg Indianapolis 

William Pidgeon Bloomington 

Irvin Stanley Westfield 

1877 Milton Roberts Linnville, Iowa 

1878 S. Ella Bogue (Dogget) Danville, Va 

Belle Chambers (Baily) Richmond 

J. Pinkney Mitchell .Seattle, Wash 

Thomas Mitchell... Olin, N. C 

Flora Moore (Brady). Indianapolis 

John O. Reed Ann Arbor, Mich 

*William Seaford.. 

Fannie Tliornburg (Parsons) Oak Park, 111 

1879 J. A Ruck ...Terre Haute 

Carrie Goodwin (Jeffrey) New Castle 

Thomas Newlin Whit tier, Cal 

1880 J.Edgar Cloud Lafayette 

Wm. N. Lamb San Francisco, Cal 

Mattie Lamb Outland ..Amboy 



— 21 — 



Ada Grace Murphy _ .Chattanooga, Term 

Ida May Roberts Matehula, Mexico 

Emma Belle Roberts Westfield 

Frank Symons Portland, Maine 

Lamira Trueblood (Kellum)'. Camby 

1881 Oscar R. Baker. Winchester 

*Corrie Bogue 

Minnie Benedict (Blankenship) Paragon 

Carrie Unthank (Kellum) Indianapolis 

*Jessie Stratton 

1882 "Arthur H. Baily I 

J. Newton Barnard Daleville 

Harriet Bogue (Newlin) Indianapolis 

Hat tie E. Dickinson Spiceland 

Charles Newlin Indianapolis 

1883 Anna Hudelson (Foster) Washington, D. C 

Ryland Ratliff Danville 

Julia Stafford (Newby) ..New Castle, R F D 2 

Emily Weeks Middletown, R F D 1 

1884 *Cora Kirk 

Ella Stratton (Hodson) ...New Castle, R F D 10 

Virginia Griffin (Cory) Dunreith 

Isadore Hall (Wilson) Spiceland 

William Julian Hastings, Neb 

Charles Newby ..Converse 

1885 Mary L. Brown (Pennington) Spiceland 

Alfred Y. King Mt. Vernon, 111 

Oliver C. Steele.. .Spiceland 

1886 L. Winnie Baily (Clement) Haddonfield, N.J 

Matfie E. Brown Daytonia, Fla 

Richard Broadbent El wood 

Elbert Griffin El wood 

Alonzo C. Hodson New Castle, R F D 10 

♦John L. McNew .- 



— 22 — 



1887 Herbert T. Bailv Spiceland 

Clarence H. Beard New Castle 

Anna K. Bogue (Shaffer) Benton Harbor, Mich 

Lindley Compton Tomah, Wis 

Elizabeth S. Hiatt (Genau) Omaha, Neb 

Abraham L. Miller Seymour 

Bert Smith Zionsville 

1888 Rhoda Ballenger (Cunningham) Indianapolis 

*Hannah Brown (Stubbing)- 

Oryntha Brown (Jester) Payton, Iowa 

*Jessie Butler 

Clara G. Edwards (Knight) St. Louis, Mo. 

John C. Cook New Castle, R F D 2 

Elva Elliott (Compton) Tomah, Wis 

Achsah E. Ratcliff (Ratliff) Pasadena, Cat 

H. H RayL... Muncie 

Charles Stubbs Indianapolis 

J. A. Greenstreet New Castle 

H. H. Ratcliff-.. Taylorsville 

1889 Laura Benedict Indianapolis 

Blanch Braddock (McNew) Greenfield 

Frank Copeland ' Dunreith 

Estella Deem (Kennedy) Spiceland 

*Lawrence Gardner — . 

Gertrude Gordon (Geneaux) Spiceland 

Sue Griffin (Evans) ' Spiceland 

Otis Stubbs Lewisville, R F D 

May Stubbs - .Pasadena, Cal 

1890 L. Etia Butler Lewisville, R F D 

Elmer Deem... Frankfort 

Ed.win B Uatcliff Spiceland 

Bennie Stratton New Castle, R F D I 

S. E. Stubbs Wilkinson 

1891 Ettu l K. Copt-land (Lee) Meadville, Pa 

l.oui<- F.dniimdeon (Pot-) - Knightstown 

M,iurine Gardner (Kei n) New Castle 

Charles N Hank Markleville 

Alice Hiatt (Copil.n.d) ..Cincinnati, O 

— 23 — 



Ernest Sisson Greenfield 

Alfred H. Symons Fort Yeats, North Dakota 

Mary M. Teas (Parker) Eaton, O 

Charles Titus Warrington 

Herbert D. VYoodard ..Fountain City 

1892 Jesse S. Baily Silverton, Col 

Clara Broun __ .Spiceland 

Warren T. Evans Canny, Minn 

John B. Greenstreet Lewisville, R F D 

Winnie Hinshaw (Milligan) ...Winchester 

David M. Kemp ...Kempton 

Alice Lawrence f Salem, Iowa 

E Stella Symons Minneapolis, Minn 

Alvin Ulrich. Greensboro 

1893 Oscar Bogue Spiceland 

Estella Charles (Fawcett) Indianapolis 

Floy Hill Pasadena, Cal 

Arthur Holloway Osklaloosa, Iowa 

Leora Jessup (Parker) ' Westland 

John Miller New Castle 

Olen Payne New Castle 

Lena Rayle. ..Spiceland 

George Smith Knightstown 

Orville White Joplin, Mo 

1894 Minnie Black (Moore) Chicago, 111 

Bessie I. Brown (Stone) Daytona, Fla 

Clarence V, Hall.. New Castle 

Horace Hardy Markleville 

Ida Holloway ( Kenworthy) Richmond 

Arlie Hood ...Chicago 

Bertha Jessup Clay Center, Neb 

El ma Lawrence... .Spiceland 

• Maud M. Shaffer ( Payne ) New Castle 

Frank Pitts Indianapolis 

Oscar F. Symons. Minneapolis, Minn 

1895 Clarence Painter.. Van Buren, Ark 

Mabel Wright (Gaar) ..Kokomo 

Edgar Cox .... ..Clarkton, N. C 



— 24 — 



♦Nellie Ratliff- - 

Howard Henley.. -. Tuttle, Okla 

Maud Wildman (Evans) Philadelphia, Pa 

Frank Hudelson Mays 

*Pearl Moffett (Wood) 

1896 Cora Hudson (Bogue) ...Spiceland 

Clara White (Wildman)... Selma, O 

Elsie Hudelson (Holland )._ Brooklyn 

Anna Morris (Wilson)... South Wabash 

Pearl M.James (Tweedy) - Wabash 

Mabel Newby (Hood) Chicago 

W. J. Carson Chicago 

Nora Griffin (Beach) New Castle 

Theresa Wildman Philadelphia, Pa 

Roscoe Edwards New Castle 

1897 Leoti Applegate (Coffin)... New Castle, RFDi 

Elva M. Hudson (Hall) Spiceland 

Lois M, Henley Indianapolis 

*Fannie Hayes. 

Floy Hudelson Greenfield 

Josie B. Harlan (Weatherman) Dana 

Jessie Leaky (lliatt) ■ New Lisbon 

Pearl Millikan (Hardy) .Markleville 

Ethel Rifner (Newby) Englewood, Kan 

Mayme Stafford (Applegate).. Spiceland 

Clyde Sisson (Moore) Indianapolis 

Minnie Stratton (Stafford) New Castle, R F D 1 

Charles Smith Cleveland, O 

*Irving White 

1898 Clifford Applegate Spiceland 

James Holtsciaw Spiceland 

Bavis Nay Springport 

Emory Katcliff New Castle R F D 

Gertrude Seaford Spiceland 

Pearl Symons Spiceland 

Lelia Smith (Rice) Spencer, O 

Charles A. Beard New York City 

Merritt Stafford ..Westland 



- 25 - 



Cora Smith (Sparks)... Summitville 

Walter Painter Lowell 

Bertha Charles .Marlem, Mont 

Ernest Shockley.. ._ Angola 

Elsie Shockley (Lockridge) Shawnee, Okla 

1800 Bessie Haisley ...Spiceland 

Bertha O. Lawrence Oskaloosa, Iowa 

Florence O. Macy Metamoris, Mexico 

Earl Moffett Knightstown, R F D 2 

Walter T. Pearce New Castle, R F D 2 

Orabell Shaffer (Bell) New Castle, R F D 2 

igoo Ethel Applegate (Fainter) Spiceland 

Edgar Ba/.zle New Castle 

Susan Benedict (Nay) Springport 

Cora Charles (Carson) Logansport 

Connie Griffin Ogden 

David W. Gordon Indianapolis 

Guy H. Hall New Lisbon 

Clyde Kennedy Rnshville 

Clarence Macy Lewisville 

Everett Macy Gainesville, Fla 

Carroll Mills... New Castle, R F D 

Cecil Newby Englewood, Kan 

*Jeanette Rifner 

Pernia Thornburg (Griffin).. Clermont, 111 

John R. Thompson Sulphur Springs 

1901 Ira E. Bell New Castle, R F D 2 

Bertha E. Butler (Ballard) Lewisville 

Raymond Byrket Ehvood 

Jennie Compton (Cope) Dunreith 

Everett Cope .Dunreith 

Deborah Edwards Knightstown, R F D 

Ethel Edwards (Kramein) Bloomington, Ind 

Lillian II. Hayes Dunreith 

Walter B. Harvey. Pittsburg, Pa 

John R. Hinshaw .Greensboro 

Everett Macy Lewisville, R F D 



- 26 — 

\ 



Georgia Millikan (Hardy) ..Pendleton 

Jennie E. Millikan (Wright) .Edinburg 

Homer E. Nugen Lewisville 

Cora E. Risk (Deem) Spiceland 

Robert A. Roberts ...New Albany 

Grace E. Stewart (Johnson) New Castle, R F D 

Russell L. Wright Portland, Oregon 

Walter C. Wilson. Pasadena, Cal 

1902 Harley Anderson.. Spiceland 

Jessie Bail y . .Cre&tyiew, Tenn 

Mary Butler . New Castle, R F D 1 

Walter Byers Knightstown, R F D 2 

Jennie Kirk Spiceland 

Guerney Maple ... . ... . .Pasadena, Cal 

Manning Smith Philadelphia, Pa 

Rcna Thomas . Richmond 

Retta Thomas .. Fountain City 

Russell Wilson . Leet, West Va 

India Yost (Cook) ... . Sulphur Springs 

1903 Rilla Bartlett Lewisville 

Nellie Beckett Spiceland 

Perrin Holt., . Indianapolis 

Arthur Johnson ...Lewisville 

Carl Newby Gate, Oklahoma 

Rupert Redic Cloudcroft, N M 

Ralph Stubbs Spiceland 

Walter Wright . . Edinburg 

1904 Elsie Bell (Applegate) Spiceland 

Josephine Beeson (Manifold) Spiceland 

Will Benedict . Springport 

Lawrence Bridges Warrington 

Warren Edwards .. .. . Knightstown, R F D 

III Evans Mt. Summitt 

Jessie Gordon (Newby) Spiceland 

Ruth Harvey Dunreith 

Hazel Heacock (Yockey) Richmond 

Homer Henley Wagner, Okla 

Claire Hoover (May) Joilet 

— 27 — 



Barton Jones Spiceland 

Belva Jordan (Coffin' New Castle, R F D I 

Guy Mriy 1 Joilet 

Pansy Newby Lewisville 

Anna Painter New Castle, R F D 

Clara Patterson (Rothrock) New Castle, R F D 

Lois Pitts Morristown, R F D 

Wendell Pitts Morristown, R F D 

Lawrence Reeves Knightstown 

Robert Reeves Wilkinson 

Etta Rifner (Parker) Hickory, N C 

John Rogers Mooreland 

Herbert Seaford ; Spiceland 

Ralph Silver . Knightstown 

Bernetha Smith Muncie 

Charks Veach Mt. Summit 

Ethel Wright (Hershaur) Dunreith 

Harold Yockey Oklahoma City, Okla 

1905 Elsie Anderson (Conwell) Mooreland 

Walter Brandy Spiceland 

Raymond 1 hike Indianapolis 

Alexander Gano — Spiceland 

Oraii Griffin Indianapolis 

Ruth Gardner New Castle, R F D I 

Elva Kennard--- Knightstown, R FD2 

Aura Lane -- ..Chicago 

Edward Pope ...New Castle, R F 1)6 

Jessie Reece Indianapolis 

Ruby Reeves ...Knightstown 

Anna Reeves Wilkinson, R F D 2 

♦Arthur Rifner 

Arden Snibbs Spiceland 

Everett Test Danville, Ky 

Amy Thomas.. Willow 

Paul Wilson Knightstown, R F D 1 

1906 Charles Dundy .- ..Billings, Mont 

Walter Uitndy Spiceland 

Arthur Hudelson New Castle, R F 1) 

Hazel Hudelson ... Dunreith 



— 28 — 



Edna Kellar Lewisville 

Frances Nugen Dunreith 

Myron Painter Spiceland 

Edgar Rogers Mooreland 

Otis Shaffer Richmond 

Maud Simmons Wilkinson 

Grover VanDine Shirley 

Orville Wright. Spiceland 

4907 Hazel Bartlett Lewisville 

Irene Bell (Wright). Greensboro 

Bertha Bowers (Rogers) Mooreland 

Ruby McDaniel Knightstown, R F D 3 

Levinus Painter New Castle, R F D 

Howard Seaford .. Spiceland 

Clenua Smith (Moflitt; . Knightstown, R F D 

Hassel Williams. . _ Muncie 

1908 Herschel All . ... .Lewisville 

Clara liurcham _. _. New Castle, R F D 10 

Ethel Chandler _ . Spiceland 

Loma Delon Spiceland 

Margaret Harden Knightstown, R F D 2 

Ruby Julian • .Lewisville 

Everett Kennard Knightstown, R F D 2 

Glen Kirkham .. . . . Rushville, R FD9 

Paul McDaniel . . . Knightstown, R F D 3 

Vida Redic ClOudcroft, New Mexico 

Hazel Reese New Castle, R F D 9 

Bessie SidwelL St. Clairsville, O 

Mary Seaford Spiceland 

Edna Swindell Greensboro 

Lucile Wilson Spiceland 

1909 Beula Arnold New Castle, R F D 6 

Loren Butler New Castle, R F D 1 

Marie Clarke Bradford, O 

Walter Hays Markleville 

Ruth Hudelson ... ,_ New Castle, R F D 10 

Ethel Jackson ... . Straughn 
Ada J arret! Lewisville, R F D 



— 29 — 



Lucile Mcllvaine Lewisville 

James McGrady New Castle 

Griffin Moffitt Knightstown, R FD 

Alma Osborn Winchester, R FD 

Elgar Pennington Spiceland 

Hoyt Reese Knightstown, R FD 

Hazel Skaates Lewisville 

Minnie Simmons Wilkinson 

Margaret Smith Spiceland 

Clayton Teeter Mooreland 

Ross Williams Dunreith 

Perry Wilson Spiceland 



1 9 1 19 11 

SPICELAND ACADEMY 

SPICELAND, INDIANA 




FACULTY AND CALENDAR 



For the Academic Year 1911-1912 



INSTRUCTORS 



Homer H. Cooper, A. M., Superintendent 
History and Science 

Ethel Publow, B. S. 
Mathematics and Science 

Anna Painter, A. B. 
Latin and English 

Manual Tiu. . . 

Edn.^ 
Dravv • 



Music 



CALENDAR 



1911 

Fall Term begins Tuesday, September 12 
Fall Term ends Friday, December 22 

1912 

Winter Term begins Monday, January 1 
Winter Term ends Friday, March 15 
Spring Term begins Monday, March 25 
Commencement, Friday, May 31 



— 3 — 



BOARD OF TRUSTEES 



Edwin B. Ratcliff, President 

S. B. Lane, Secretary and Treasurer 

John S. Griffin 

Seth C. Symons 

Charles B. Harvey 

Arthur \V. Osborn 



INSTRUCTORS 



Academic Year 1910-1911 

Homer H. Cooler, A. M., Superintendent 
History and Science 

Laura Doan 
Mathematics and Science 

Emma Kendall, A. B. 
Latin and English 

Nellie Jones 
Music and Drawing 

— 4 — 



SPICELAND ACADEMY 



HISTORY 

PICELAND ACADEMY is the oldest Academy in 
charge of the Friends in Indiana. It was chartered 
as an academy in INTO, but its history as a Friends' 
school extends over a period of eighty years. It is 
under the control of the Spicelaud Monthly Meet- 
ing, by which body the Board of Trustees is ap- 
pointed. The teachers are selected by the Trustees. 
While the school is under denominational control, it is 
not sectarian in the least; its foundation rests upon Chris- 
tian culture'; it has been kept under strong Christian in- 
fluences, and its purpose is to develop practical, earnest, 
and active Christian manhood and womanhood. 

The first class graduated in 1870. The Alumni Asso- 
ciation now enrolls three hundred ninety-seven. About 
three thousand five hundred students have received in- 
struction in the school since its organization as an academy. 

LOCATION 

Spiceland Academy is located in the beautiful town 



of Spiceland, Indiana, in the southern part of Henry 
county, on the Lake Erie & Western railroad, two miles 
north of Dunreith, on the Pennsylvania railroad. The 
buildings are situated in the midst of a beautiful grove, 
adjoining which is a large campus, well adapted to athletic 
sports. The interurban street-car line gives connections 
with surrounding cities. 

ENTRANCE 

Students may enter at any time, but students coming 
from other schools are required to bring certificates stat- 
ing their literary and moral standing. In the absence of 
approved certificate, examinations will be held and stu- 
dents classified accordingly. Classes in Grammar School 
branches are maintained as demand may justiy, ail'ording 
opportunity for preparatory work to students who may 
not be eligible to regular academic standing. 

The conditions for admission to the First Year class 
are the same as for entrance to the public high schools of 
this State. 

In general, a graduate from non-commissioned high 
schools of this comity can enter the Academy with credit 
for the number of months' work he has studied in his 
home school wherein the work is up to the standard of the 
commissioned high school. 

THE COURSE OF STUDY 

The Academy course of study has been arrauged with 
two purposes in view: 



First — It is prepared to conform to the needs and 
desires of all students who may not have the opportunity 
to pursue a college course, but who desire a practical edu- 
cation which will prepare them to lead an active and a 
successful life. 

Second — It is arranged to enable students to make the 
necessary preparation for admission in college without 
examination. 

THE ENGLISH COURSE 

The completion of the English Course will entitle one 
to a certificate of credit. It is intended for those who 
have no expectation of attending college, but who wish to 
be prepared as well as possible for their work in life. 

It is to be understood that the College Preparatory 
Con rse is the one required for college entrance require- 
ments. 

BIBLE STUDY 

The study of the Bible is considered of so much im- 
portance that arrangements have been made by which it 
will be taught in the Academy. The subject will be made 
an elective one. Credit will be given as in other studies. 
This will be one of the most valuable studies in the course 
and it is hoped many will take advantage of the work. 

STATE CERTIFICATE OF EQUIVALENCY 

The State Board of Education has given the Academy 
a Certificate of Equivalency. This enables the graduates 
to enter any college in the State without an examination. 



COURSE OF STUDY 



COLLEGE PREPARATORY 

Latin or 
German 
Algebra 
English I 
Botany or 

Physical Geography 

Caesar or German 
Geometry 
Ancient History 
English II 

Cicero or German 
Higher Algebra 
"•"Modern History 
English III 
Solid Geometry 

Latin 

*U. S. History 

Physics 

English IV 
*Nature 
*Bible 

"Commercial Arithmetic 



FIRST YEAR 



SECOND YEAR 



JUNIOR 



SENIOR 



ENGLISH 

*Manual Training 
*Domestic Science 

Algebra 

English I 

Botany or 

Physical Geography 

*Agriculture 
Geometry 
Anc ient History 
English II 

*Bookkeeping 
Algebra 

*Modern History 

English III 
*Solid Geometry 

^Commercial Arithmetic 
*U. S. History 

Physics 

English IV 
* Nature 
*Bible 



* Subjects marked with a «tar are elective, 
in addition to those above mentioned, the following eleetives may be taken : 
KilfHifili History, Music, Drawing, and special eleetivrs. 



MANUAL TRAINING. AGRICULTURE, BOOKKEEPING 

The Board of Trustees is making special preparation for the teaching 
of the practical subjects demanded by the spirit of the times. Special 
courses in Manual Training, Agriculture, and Bookkeeping are offered. 
Those of our young people who do not expect to attend college may now 
have the opportunity in the Academy of securing an education in those 
subjects especially desired by them. 

Students who wish to do post-graduate work will have an excellent 
opportunity to study in elective subjects. 



Advanced classes in any of the lines of study will be 
formed whenever a sufficient number of pupils desire the 
higher work. The diploma of the Academy will admit the 
student to any of the colleges in Indiana or of other States 
without entrance examination?. 

Higher classes in any subject or classes in subjects not 
offered will be formed whenever there is sufficient de- 
mand, and tuition will be charged, one dollar per month 
for each study. Satisfactory work in these studies may be 
substituted for work in regular course at the discretion of 
the Superintendent. 

The course of study makes provision for a number of 
eleetives, thus giving the student an opportunity to select 
work along the line of his preference. The thirty-two 
credits required for examination are distributed among the 
departments as follows: Latin, seven; English, six; His- 
tory, two; Mathematics, six; Science, two; Elective, nine. 

It is especially urged that all pupils take the regular 
College Preparatory Course of study, and after graduation 
attend college, if possible. 

Increased advantages are offered in the arrangements 
made to take elective work in the following departments : 
Drawing, Music, and Elocution and Oratory. 

ENGLISH 

I. English Composition. 

The aim of this course is to give the student a practi- 
cal knowledge in the principles of English composition. 
Every student should be able to use correctly his owu lan- 
guage both in writing and in speaking. Two recitations 



— 9 — 



per week are given in this study during each year of the 
Academic course. The student is required to write at 
least one short theme each week. The theme is then dis- 
cussed by the class and carefully criticised by the teacher. 

1st year — Composition and Grammar. 
2nd year — Composition and Rhetoric. 
3rd year — Composition and Rhetoric. 
4th year — Term Essays and Thesis. 

II. English Literature. 

The purpose of this course is to create an interest in 
literature for its own sake and to increase the culture of 
the student by developing a love for the best in thought 
and style. This can be done only by a thorough study of 
the masterpieces of the most important English and Amer- 
ican writers. It is desired to emphasize that the reading 
of the following selections does not constitute the proper 
study of literature. The time element is important. To 
receive credit for a year's work requires nine months* 
time under the careful supervision of an experienced 
teacher. 

First Year — First semester. 1, Longfellow's Poems; 
2, Irving's Sketch Book; 8, Whittier's Foems; 4, Cooper's 
Last of the Mohicans; Home Reading, Pilgrim's Progress. 
Second semester — 1, Lowell's Foems; 2, Hawthorne's Won- 
der Book; 3, Ancient Mariner and Deserted Village; 4, 
Shakespeare, selected; Home Reading, Christinas Carol, 
A Man Without a Country. 

Second Year — First semester. 1, Scott's Ivauhoe ; 2, 
Lady of the Lake; 3, Sir Roger de Coverley; Home Read- 



— 10 — 



ing, Lorna Doone. Second semester — 1, Macaulay's Life 
of Johnson; 2, Silas Marner; 3, Merchant of Venice; 
Home Reading, selected. 

Third Year — First semester. 1, Abernethy's Ameri- 
can Literature; 2, Washington's Farewell Address; 3, 
Webster's Bunker Hill Oration ; 4, Foe's Poems and Prose ; 
Home Reading, The Crisis. Second semester — 1, Emerson's 
Essays; 2, Lowell's Poems; 3, Shakespeare, selected. 

Fourth Year — First semester. 1, English Literature, 
Newcomer; 2, Hamlet and Macbeth; 3, Milton's Poems; 
Home Reading, selected. Second semester — 1, Burke's 
Conciliation with the American Colonies; 2, Palgrave, 
Book IV; 3, Tennyson's Poems; Home Reading, selected. 

HISTORY 

The course in History is now arranged to conform to 
the recommendations of the Committee of Seven of the 
American Historical Association. 

Besides the culture value of history, it is to be re- 
membered that it is the study which furnishes the students 
the ideals of character which lead to the highest moral 
growth. The studeut should thoroughly understand the 
institutional life of the people studied. 

The purposes of history in the Academy are as follows : 
First — The development of moral character. History 
as the study of institutional life and of character teaches 
us to watch the progress of humanity in the rise and fall 
of nations. Success or failure in national life or in the 
life of a person will cause us to adopt for ourselves and our 
country that which has proven of excellent worth. History 



— 11 — 



helps us to avoid the mistakes of other people and nations. 

Seconds— The teaching of patriotism and the broaden- 
ing of our interests and sympathies. While we wish to 
be familiar with our own government and national char- 
acter, we must recognize the broad principle of the uni- 
versal brotherhood of men. 

Third — The development of our powers of judgment. 
It is here that we especially study the relation between 
cause and effect. Every statesman has been a student of 
history. In studying the problems of life which have con- 
fronted other people we are greatly aided in the practical 
solution of the life problems of today. 

Fourth — The acquirement of useful facts. This, 
though generally considered of most importance, is in 
fact but a subordinate purpose in the study of history. 

Fifth — The gaining of a broad and practical general 
culture. The work consists of a study of Ancient History 
in the second year; a special study of Medieval and Mod- 
ern History in the third year; of English History in the 
third year; United States fli story and Civil Government 
in the fourth year. 

MATHEMATICS 

The aim of this study is to introduce the student to 
mathematical methods and develop in him the power to 
reason clearly and accurately on any given problem. Al- 
gebra is studied throughout the first year of the high 
school and the first half of the third year; Geometry dur- 
ing the second year and through the last half of the third 
year. A great deal of supplementary work is given in 



— 12 — 



Algebra, and original exercises are introduced as much as 
possible in Geometry. Arithmetic is an elective study. 

LATIN 

There is no subject in the Academy which has greater 
disciplinary value to the pupil than the study of Latin. It 
trains and strengthens the memory, cultivates and quick- 
ens the perception, and developes habits of ready, accu- 
rate and sound thinking. 

A very large per cent, of all the words used in the 
dictionary will be of Latin origin, therefore some knowl- 
edge of this subject is absolutely necessary for a correct 
understanding of our own English language. It gives us 
a key to a quicker understanding of all that we read or 
hear. It is essential to all who are to continue work in 
college. It is helpful to every professional man. It will 
give us a greater appreciation of the Latin writers and 
speakers. It increases our general culture and contributes 
to our broader discipline. 

The College Preparatory Course is required of all who 
expect to attend college;. In general cases, to (it the stu- 
dent for college, equivalent subjects may be substituted. 

SCIENCE 

The Academy is supplied with sufficient apparatus to 
be a valuable aid in the study of natural sciences. In 
Physics the subject is illustrated by many simple pieces 
of apparatus, besides the air pump, electrical machine, 
batteries, etc. Geology and Mineralogy are illustrated by 
a collection of more than twelve hundred specimens, pre- 



— 13 — 



sented to the Academy by the Alumni. In Zoology and 
Botany, animals and plants are studied from nature, and 
systems of classification are made prominent. Iu all the 
sciences objects are used as much as possible. 

The following are the purposes of science work : 
First — To interest the pupil in the observation of na- 
ture. 

Second — To develop the power of reasoning through 
the original investigation of the truths of nature. 

Third — To give a practical knowledge of the elemen- 
tary principles of those sciences which are now, in a great 
measure, causing our rapid progress in the civilization of 
the world. 

COURSE IN MUSIC 

Vocal and instrumental music will be taught by an 
experienced teacher. 

Iu the beginning course, students who have known 
nothing of music will be taught to read readily and sing 
ordinary church music. Advance work will be given to 
prepare students to form and conduct chorus classes and 
to teach music in the public schools. 

Excellent opportunity will be offered to all students 
who wish to take special courses in instrumental music. 

GENERAL ITEMS 

The government of the school is based upon the idea 
that manhood is more than scholarship; that self-respect 
and self-control on the part of a student are important 
factors in the formation of character. Greater stress is 



laid upon the thoroughness of instruction and accuracy of 
knowledge than upon rapidity of advancement; 

For many years the health of students has been uni- 
formly good. There is probably no better location in the 
State in this respect. 

The Friends and Methodists both hold religious servi- 
ces on the Sabbath and each maintains a Sabbath school. 
Meetings of the Young People's Society of Christian En- 
deavor and the Epworth League are held every Sabbath 
evening, and students are welcome to their meetings and 
membership. 

A sufficient number of teachers is constantly employed 
so that large classes may be avoided, and students may re- 
ceive personal attention. 

Expenses are as low as at any other school affording 
equal advantages. 

The managers of the school are very careful to make 
this an institution in which students who are away from 
home and its restraints will be surrounded by good, moral 
influences, and in this they have the co-operation of the 
citizens of the village. There are no beer, liquor or bil- 
liard saloons in the village. 

No student whose inlluence is known to have a cor- 
rupting tendency will be retained in the school. 

DIPLOMAS 

Students whose conduct is exemplary, and who com- 
plete the course of study and prepare and deliver a suita- 
ble literary production, will be furnished a diploma, 
signed by the instructors and the President and Secretary 



— 15 — 



of the Board of Trustees. To receive a diploma a student 
should be in attendance at the Academy one year, except 
when special arrangements are made with the Superin- 
tendent and Board of Trustees. 

LECTURES 

Students have the opportunity to hear good lectures 
at small expense. Addresses on various subjects are given 
during the year. , 

LITERARY EXERCISES 

Literary exercises may be required of all students in 
all grades, both in class work and before the public. Care 
•is used that students may learn the art of composition and 
public delivery. Essays and declamations are a part of 
the regular school work in the department of oratory. 

LIBRARIES 

Five sets of encyclopedias are in the school rooms, 
and these, with the dictionaries and numerous reference 
books, are for the free use of all. There is a large library 
in connection with the school, which comprises about three 
thousand volumes. 



— 1G — 



TEXTS USED DURING THE YEAR 



First Latin Collar and Daniel 

Classics Various Texts 

English . . Selections 

Rhetoric ___Stebbins 

English Literature Newcomer 

Algebra Slaught and Lennes 

Geometry Went worth 

Physical Geography Davis 

Physics Millikan and Gale 

Chemistry . Cooley 

Astronomy Steele-Todd 
Botany Bergen and Bailey 

Psychology . Halleck 



English History. ..Wrong 

Civics Fiske 

Political Economy Walker 

U. S. History Hart 

Grammar- Wisely 

Physiology Macy and Norris 

Ancient History ._ West 

Modern History- . Myers 

American Literature . Abernethy 

Grammar Latin Bennett 

C;esar Bennett 
Cicero Bennett 
Vergil .... Bennett 



EXPENSES 
RATES OF TUITION 

Academic classes for each study $1.00 per month 

Academic classes for two or more studies 

Special classes for each study $].<>() per month 

Students who enter at irregular times will be charged 
full tuition for the term in case they complete the term's 
work in such manner as to receive credit toward the diploma. 

Special students and others who do not expect to earn 
credit in the regular course will be charged only for the 
time of actual enrollment in the classes. 

Occasionally those who are especially strong are per- 
mitted to earn credits by outside study under the super- 
vision of the teachers. For such credits as these one-half 
the regular tuition will be charged. 

Tuit ion is due at the opening of each term, and settle- 



— 17 — 



J 



merit should be made with the Superintendent or the 
Treasurer of the Board of Trustees. Students will receive 
no credit for their work until the tuition is paid. 

BOARDING 

The citizens of Spiceland have always given the stu- 
dents a hearty welcome by receiving them into their homes. 
The cost of boarding and rooms in private families where 
everything is furnished can be had for $8.00 to $4.00 a 
week. Rooms, both furnished and unfurnished, can be 
had from 28 to 50 cents a \reek, and table board of excel- 
lent quality at the rate of $:2.o0 to $3.50 for the full week. 

Thus persons who may live near enough to go home at 
the end of the week, and who wish to economize, may re- 
duce the cost of living to a very small sum. 



LIST OF STUDENTS 



SENIORS 



Brown, Roy 
Caldwell, Howard 
Cochran, Hazel 
Cochran, Ruby 
Evans, Ralph 
Fields, Decil 
Harvey, Ruth 
Harvey, Howard 
HoU'man, Clarence 
Hunnicutt, Myra 



Hunnicutt, Margaret 
Myers, Grace 
Painter, Mira 
Pennington, Everett 
Pierson, Erma 
Potterf, Rex 
Shipley, Leah 
Smith, Andrew 
Symons, Merwin 
Williams, Ernestine 



Bacon, Sadie 
Baily, John 



JUNIORS 

Howell, Ruby 
Lane, Melissa 



— 18 — 



Bell, Dorothy 
Chandler, Ralph 
Chew, Edith 
Dau^herty, Edith 
DeVVitte, Gertrude 
Ewing, Russell 
Fields, Ada 
Hardin, Alviu 
Hays, Martha 



Macev, Mabel 
MolFe tt, Exie 
Montgomery, Clara 
Peckinpaugh, Earl 
Test, Rachel 
Thomas, Bear! 
Thomas, Virginia 
Toohey, Margaret 
West, Audrey 



SOPHOMORES 



Buck, Mabel 
Bundy, Marie 
Butler, Addie 
DeWitte, Olive 
Draper, Jessie 
Evans, Anna 
Hall, Iris 
Hodson, Georgia 
Kiser, Flossie 



Long, Marie 



Mercer, Mildred 
Moffitt, Hazel 
Munden, Beula 
Pickett, Leonora 
Sellers, Lydia 
Stanley, Stacey 
Wilson, Oassell 
Wilson, Ercel 
Waddell, Zola 



FRESHMEN 



Black, Marie 
Brown. Harold 
Catt, Edith 
Cramer, Paul 
Copeland, Mary 
Dan»ihertv, Helen 
Davis, Esther 
Delon, Floyd 
Ewing, Cortez 
Fields, Hattie 
Haisley, Pauline 

Trobau 



Hardin, Fred 
Harvey, Ethel 
HutFord, George 
Jarrett, Carl 
Ka^sen, Mabel 
McDaniel, Irene 
Mmllin, Marie 
Pennington, A.mies 
Pickering, Vivian 
Sliephard Maurine 
Thomas, Mark 
gh, Leslie 



IRREGULAR 

Delon, Horace Shipley, Esther 

Valentine, Richard 



— 19 — 



LIST OF ACADEMY SUPERINTENDENTS 



Clarkson Davis 1863-1867 

Edward Taylor 1867-1868 

Clarkson Davis 1868-1874 

Timothy Wilson 1874-1876 

Clarkson Davis 1876- 1 882 

Thomas Newlin 1882-1883 

Timothy Wilson 18831885 

Thomas Newlin 1885-1802 

J. Frank Brown 1892-1893 

Arthur W. Jones 1893-1894 

George W. Neet 1894-1898 

Murray S. Wildman 1808-1901 

M.S.Woods ... ... 1901-1903 

Homer !I. Cooper 1003- 



ALUMNI 



OFFICERS FOR 191 1-1 V 12 

President ..... Lindley Johnson 

Vice-President .. Lawrence Reeves 

Secretary , Pearl Symons 

Treasurer Walter Hays 

( James Holtsclaw 
Executive Committee .. ■] Myron Painter 

( Decil Fields 

Orator L. Ftta Butler 

Vice-( tr.itor Nellie Uedcett 

Historian... Lena Kayle 

Vice-Historian Louis Henley 



Those marked (*) are deceased. 

1870 *Eli U.Cook 

John J. Stubbs._> - .Omaha, Neb 



— 20 — 



1871 *Walter D. Jones 

*A!vin H. Jenkins 

*I. Macy Good — 

C. R. Dixon Paonia, Co) 

R. G. Boone New York City 

Dallas Sisson ... Spiceland 

Mary Ballenger (Barnard) New Castle 

Louisa Wickersham . Lewisville, R. F. D 1 

Lida Edwards (Saint) New Castle 

1872 Lindley H. Johnson ..Dunreith 

*David Plenley 

♦Jacob Hill 

Henry W. Painter New Castle, R F D 1 

Robert G. Mitchell Pacific Grove, Cal 

1873 *S*die D Talbert (Wright) 

Aaron li. Bell Springtown, Ark 

*J. Tilrnan Hutchins 

John Pennington Damascus, O 

Mary Stubbs (Painter).. ...New Castle, R F D 1 

Nathan Williams Oswego, Ran 

S. Carrie Talbert (Newby) Wichita, Kan 

1874 Alice Coffin (Russell) .'New York City 

Alvira Spencer (Harold ) Indianapolis 

J. P. Edwards Knightstown 

William S. Motrin Rennard 

Edwin 0. Kennard Pasadena, Cal 

Nathan Kosenberger Muscatine, Iowa 

W. E. Jackson... Knightstown 

D. C. Mitchell. ...Spiceland 

1875 W. W. Gregg...-.:. Indianapolis 

William Pidgeon L .... .. Hloomington 

lrv in Stanley West lie Id 

1877 Milton Roberts Linnville, Iowa 

1878 S.Ella ISogue (Dogget).. Danville, Va 

Belle Chambers ( liaily) Richmond 

J. Pinkney Mitchell ...Seattle, Wash 

Thomas Mitchell Knightstown, R F D 1 

— 21 — 



Flora Moore (Brady) ....Lincolnville 

John O. Reed Ann Arbor, Mich 

♦William Seaford 

Fannie Thornburg (Parsons) ...Oak Park, III 

1879 J- A. Buck Terre Haute 

Carrie Goodwin (Jeffrey) New Castle 

Thomas Newlin Whittier, Cal 

1880 J. Edgar Cloud Louisville, Ky 

Wm. N. Lamb San Francisco. Cal 

Mattie Lamb Outland ..Amboy 

Ada Grace Murphy ...Chattanooga, Tenn 

Ida May Roberts Westfield 

Emma Belle Robersi. Westfield 

Frank Symons Portland, Maine 

Lamira Trueblood (Kellum) Camby 

1881 Oscar R. Baker.. Winchester 

*Corrie Bogue 

Minnie Benedict ( Blankenship) Paragon 

Carrie Unthank (Kellum) ...Indianapolis 

*Jessie Stratton 

1882 *Arthur H. Baily _. 

J Newton Barnard Daleville 

Harriet Bogue (Newlin) ...Indianapolis 

Hattie E. Dickinson ..Spiceland 

Charles Newlin ..Indianapolis 

1883 Anna H tide I son (Foster) Washington, D. C 

Ryland Ratliff Danville 

Julia Stafford (Newby) New Castle, R F D 2 

Emily Weeks Middletown, R F D 1 

1884 *Cora Kirk .* 

Ella Stratton (Hodson) New Castle, R F I) io 

Virginia Griffin (Cory) Dunreith 

Isadore Hall (Wilson) Spiceland 

William Julian Hastings, Neb 

Charles Newby Converse 

1885 Mary L. Brown (Pennington) Spiceland 

Alfred Y. King. '.. Mt. Vernon, III 

Oliver C. Steele Spiceland 

— 22 — 



1886 L. Winnie Baily (Clement) Haddonfield, N J 

Mattie E. Brown Daytonia, Fla 

Richard Broadbent Elwood 

Elbert Griffin _' Elwood 

Alonzo C. Hodson New Castle, R F D 10 

*John L. McNew 

Russell Ratliff Marion 

1887 Herbert T. Baily Spiceland 

Clarence H. Beard New Castle 

Anna K. Bogue (Shaffer).. Benton Harbor, Mich 

Lindley Compton Tomah, Wis 

Elizabeth S. Hiatt (Genau) Omaha, Neb 

Abraham Miller Seymour 

Bert Smith Zionsville 

1888 Rhoda Ballenger (Cunningham) Indianapolis 

*Hannah Brown (Stubbing) 

Oryntha Brown (Jester) Payton, Iowa 

*Jessie Butler 

Clara G. Edwards (Knight) St. Louis, Mo 

John C. Cook New Castle, R F D 2 

Elva Elliott (Compton) ....Tomah, Wis 

Achsah E. Ratcliff (Ratliff) Pasadena, Cal 

H. II. Rayl M uncle 

Charles Stubbs Frankfort 

J. A. Greenstreet New Castle 

H. H. Ratcliff Taylorsville, 11| 

1889 Laura Benedict Indianapolis 

Blanch Braddock (McNew) ..Greenfield 

Frank Copeland -.Dunreith 

Estella Deem (Kennedy) Spiceland 

♦Lawrence Gardner 

Gertrude Gordon (Gcneaux) Independence, Kan 

Sue Griffin (Evans) Spiceland 

Otis Stubbs Lewisvilie, R F D 

May White T l'asadena, Cal 

1890 L. Etta Butler Lewisvilie, R F D 

Elmer Deem ...Frankfort 

Edwin B. Ratcliff ...Spiceland 



-23- 



Bennie Stratton 
S. E. Stubbs.. 



New Castle, R F D i 
Wilkinson 



1891 Ethel E. Copeland (Lee) .Meadville, Pa 

Louie Edmundson (Poe) Knightstown 

Maurine Gardner (Kern) — Spice land 

Charles N Hardy.. Markleville 

Alice Hiatt (Copeland) Cincinnati, O 

Ernest Sisson Greenfield 

Alfred H. Symons Supai, Ariz 

Mary M. Teas (Parker) ..Eaton, O 

Charles Titus , ' Warrington 

Herbert D. VVoodard Chicago, III 

1892 Jesse S. Baily Silverton, Col 

Clara Brown Spiceland 

Warren T. Evans Canby, Minn 

John B. Greenstreet _. Lewisville, R FD 

Winnie Ilinshaw (Milligan) Winchester 

David M. Kemp Kemp ton 

Alice Lawrence Spiceland 

Estella Symons Minneapolis, Minn 

Alvin Ulrich Greensboro 

1893 Oscar liogue Spiceland 

Estella Charles (Fawcett) Indianapolis 

Floy Hill Pasadena, Cal 

Arthur Holloway Oskaloosa, Iowa 

Leora Jessup ( Parker) - Westland 

John Miller New Castle 

' *01en Payne 

Len?. Rayle Spiceland 

George Smith .. Knightstown 

Orville White .Joplin, Mo 

1894 Minnie Black (Moore) .... Chicago, 111 

Bessie I. Brown (Stone) Daytona. Fla 

Clarence V. Hall - New Castle 

Horace Hardy Markleville 

Ida Holloway (Kenworthy) Richmond 

Arlie Hood Chicago 

Bertha Jessup Clay Center, Neb 



— 24 — 



Elma Lawrence 

Maud M. Shaffer (Payne) 

Frank Pitts 

Oscar F. Symons 

1895 Clarence Painter - .. 

Mabel Wright (Gaar;. 
Edgar Cox .. 

♦Nellie Ratliff . 

Howard Henley 

Maud Wildman (Evans) 

Frank Hudelson 

♦Pearl Moffett 



1896 Cora Hudson (Bogue) ..Spiceland 

Clara White (Wildman) Selma, O 

Elsie Hudelson (Holland) Brooklyn 

Anna Morris (Wilson) South Wabash 

Pearl M. James (Tweedy) Wabash 

Mabel Newb> (Hood) Chicago 

W.J.Carson New York 

Nora Griffin (Beach) Anderson 

Tneresa Wildman _ Philadelphia, Pa 

Roscoe Edwards New Castle 

1897 Leoti Applegate (Coffin) . . . New Castle, R F D 1 

Elva M. Hudson (Hall) . .■ . .Spiceland 

Lois M. Henley Indianapolis 

♦Fannie Hayes - 

Floy Hudelson. . Greenfield 

Josie B. Harlan (Weatherman) Dana 

Jessie Leaky (Hiatt) New Lisbon 

Pearl Millikan (Hardy). . . Markleville 

Ethel Rifner (Newfoy) Englewood, Kan 

Mayme Stafford (Applegate) Spiceland 

Clyde Sisson (Moore) ----- Indianapolis 

Minnie Stratton (Stafford) New Castle, R F D 1 

Charles Smith Mt, Summit 

♦Irving White 

1898 Clifford Applegate Spiceland 

James Holtsclaw Spiceland 



— 25 — 



Spiceland 

New Castle 

Indianapolis 

Minneapolis, Minn 

Van Buren, Ark 
Cambridge City 
Clarkton, N C 



Tuttle, Okla 
Philadelphia, Pa 
.Mays 



BavisNay Danville 

Emory Ratcliff New Castle, R F D 

Gertrude Seaford Spiceland 

Pearl Symons Spiceland 

Lelia Smith (Rice) Spencer, O 

Charles A. Heard New York City 

Merritt Stafford Carthage 

Cora Stafford (Sparks) Summitville 

Walter Painter . Lowell 

Bertha Charles (Hewitt; Harlem, Mont 

Ernest Shockley Angola 

Elsie Shockley (Lockridge) Shawnee, Okla 

1899 Bessie Haisley ._ i Spiceland 

Bertha (). Lawrence. Gibara, Cuba 

Florence O. Macy Metamoris, Mexico 

Earl Moffeit Knightstown, R F 1) 2 

Walter T. Pearce Rushville 

Ofabell Shaffer (Bell) New Castle, R F 1) 2 

1900 Ethel Applegate (Painter) Spiceland 

Edgar Baz/.le ...New Castle 

Susan Benedict (Nay) Danville 

Cora Charles (Carson) Spiceland 

Connie Griffin Ogden 

David W. Gordon St. Louis 

Guy H. Hall New Lisbon 

Cl>de Kennedy Berkley, Cal 

Clarence Macy .Scott City, Kan 

Everett Macy Scott City, Kan 

Carroll Mills . New Castle, R F D 

Cecil Newby Englewood, Kan 

*Jeanette Rifner 

Pernia Thornburg (Griffin) Clermont, III 

John K. Thompson ...New Castle 

1901 Ira E, Hell New Castle, R F 1) 2 

Bertha E. Butler (Ballard) Lewisviile 

Raymond Byrket Lewisviile 

Jennie Conipto.n (Cope) Dunreith 

Everett Cope ...Dunreith 



— 26 — 



Deborah Edwards Knightstown, R F D 

Ethel Edwards (Kramein) Bloomington, 111 

Lillian H. Hayes Dunreith 

Walter B. Harvey Pittsburg, Pa 

John R, Hinshaw New Castle 

Everest Macy Lewisviile, R F D 

Georgia Millikan ( Hardy ) Pendleton 

Jennie E. Millikan (Wright) ... Edinburg 

Homer Nugen Lewisviile 

Cora E. Risk (Deem) Spiceland 

Robert A. Roberts New Albany 

Grace E. Stewart (Johnson) Greenfield 

Russell L. Wright Portland, Oregon 

Walter C. Wilson Pasadena, Cal 

1902 Harley Anderson Spiceland 

Jessie Baily Crestview, Tenn 

Mary Butler New Castle, R F D 1 

Walter Byers Knightstown, R F D 2 

Jennie Kirk . New Castle 

Guerney Maple . Pasadena, Cal 

Manning Smith Philadelphia, Pa 

Rena Thomas Fountain City 

Retta Thomas Matamoras, Md 

Russell Wilson . Whittier, Cal 

India Yost (Cook) Sulphur Springs 

1903 Rilla Bartlett (Harvey) Pittsburg 

Nellie Beckett Spiceland 

Perrin Holt Indianapolis 

Arthur Johnson Lewisviile 

Carl Newby Gate, Oklahoma 

Rupert Redic El Paso, Tex 

Ralph Sttibbs .. Spiceland 

Walter Wright Edinburg 

1904 Elsie Bell (Applegate) ... Spiceland 

Josephine Beeson Spiceland 

Will Benedict Springport 

Lawrence Bridges Warrington 

Warren Edwards Knightstown, R F D 



— 27 — 



Irl Evans Mt. Summitt 

Jessie Gordon (Newby) Spiceland 

Ruth Harvey Dunreith 

Hazel Heacock (Yockey) Spiceland 

Homer Henley Muskoogee, Okla 

Claire Hoover (May) Indianapolis 

Barton Jones Spiceland 

Helva Jordan (Coffin) New Castle, RFDi 

Guy May Indianapolis 

Pansy Newby Lewisville 

Anna Painter New Castle, R F D 

Clara Patterson (Rothrock) New Castle, R F D 

Lois Pitts ... Morristown, R F 1) 

Wendell Pitts.. Morristown, R F 1) 

Lawrence Reeves Knightstown 

Robert Reeves Wilkinson 

Etta Kifner (Parker)... ... Indianapolis 

John Rogers Mooreland 

Heroert Sea ford ...... Spiceland 

Ralph Silver ... Knightstown 

Bernetha Smith . .Muncie 

Charles Yeach .. Mt. Summitt 

Ethel Wr ight ( Hershaur) . Dunreith 

Harold Yockey Oklahoma City, Okla 

1905 Elsie Anderson (Conwell) ..Mooreland 

Walter Brandy . _ .Spiceland 

Raymond Duke .Indianapolis 

Alexander Gano Spiceland 

Oran Griffin Indianapolis 

Ruth Gardner New Castle, R F Di 

Kl\a Kennard . Knightstown, R F D2 

Aura Lane Spiceland 

Edward Pope .New Castle, R F D 6 

Jessie Reece ... . . Indianapolis 

Ruby Reeves . .Knightstown 

Anna Reeves .Wilkinson, R F D 2 

*Arthur Riiner 

Arden Stubbs New Castle 

Evetett Test Spiceland 



— 23 — 



Amy Thomas (Sherry) Willow 

Paul Wilson Spiceland 

1906 Charles Bundy Billings, Mont 

Walter Bundy Spiceland 

Arthur Hudelson New Castle, R F D 

Hazel Hudelson ... Dunreith 

Edna Kellar ... Lewisville 

Frances Nugen . . .Hagerstown 

Myron Painter . .. Spiceland 

Edgar Rogers .. ... _ Mooreland 

Otis Shaffer. . . Richmond 

Maud Simmons ( Bolin) Zanesvilie, O 

Grover VanDine Shirley 

Orville Wright _ . Spiceland 

1907 Hazel Bartlett Lewisville 

Irene Bell (Wright) ..Greensboro 

Bertha Bowers (Rogers) Mooreland 

Ruby McDaniel Knightstown, R F D3 

Levinus Painter . New Castle, R F D 

Howard Seaford _ Spiceland 

Genua Smith (Moftitt) Lewisville 

Hassel Williams Muncie 

1908 Herschel Alf .... Lewisville 

Clara Burcham ._ New Castle, R F D 10 

Ethel Chandler Spiceland 

Loma Delon . ... Spiceland 

Margaret Harden Knightstown, R F D 

Ruby Julian (Reece) Washington, D C 

Everett Kennard Knightstown, R F D 2 

Glen Kirkharn Rushville, R F D9 

Paul McDaniel Knightstown, R F D 3 

Vida Redic ..Cloudcroft, New Mexico 

Ha/.el Reese New Castle, R F Dg 

Bessie Sidwell St. Clairsville, O 

Mary Seaford (Alf) .. Lewisville 

Edna Swindell ... Greensboro 

Lucile Wilson Pasadena, Ca! 



— 29 



1900 Beula Arnold. New Castle, R F D 6 

Loren Butler New Castle, R F D i 

Marie Clarke Bradford, O 

Walter Hays... Markleville 

Ruth Hudelson New Castle, RFDio 

Ethel Jackson Straughn 

Ada Jarrett Spiceland 

Lucile Mcllviine Lewisville 

James McGrady New Castle 

Griffin Moffitt Knightstown, R F D 

Alma Osborn Winchester, R F D 

Elgar Pennington __ Spiceland 

Hoyt Reese Knightstown, R F D 

Hazel Skaates Lewisville 

Minnie Simmons Wilkinson 

Margaret Smith Columbus, O 

Clayton Teeter Moorcland 

Ross Williams Dunreith 

Perry Wilson Spiceland 

1910 Mary Antrim Spiceland 

Helen Bartlett ...Lewisville 

Clarence Cartwright Lewisville 

Nettie Grissom New Castle 

Marie Hendricks Straughn 

Bernice Henshaw Dunreith 

Mary Jessup Modoc 

Minnie Riser (Boyd) Dunreith 

Andrew Markle. Shirley 

Ruth May .. . Straughn 

Ruth Moffett Knightstown, R F D 

Clarence Rich Mays, R F D 25 

Hazel Seaford Spiceland 

Lena Shively Mt. Summit 

William Smith Columbus, O 

Edith Stigleman Spiceland 

Leanna Taylor Spiceland 

Ralph Test. . Spiceland 

Kerney Wilson Spiceland 



- 30 — 



FACULTY AND CALENDAR 



For (he Academic Year 1912-1913 



INSTRUCTORS 

Homer H. Cooper, A. M., Superintendent 
History 

Virginia Graves 
Latin and German 

Anna Painter, A. B. 
English and Science 

LlJClLE Mdl.VAINE 

Mathematics and Science 

Edna Macy 
Drawing 



Music 

CALENDAR 

1912 

Fall Term begins Tuesday, September 10 
Fall Term ends Friday, December 20 

1913 

Winter Term begins Monday, January ii 
Winter Term ends Friday, March 21 
Spring Term begins Monday, March 31 
Commencement, Friday, June 6 



/ 



BOARD OF TRUSTEES 



Edwin B. Ratcliff, President 

S. B. Lane, Secretary and Treasurer 

John S. Griffin 

Seth C. Symons 

Charles B. Harvey 

Arthur W. Osborn 



INSTRUCTORS 



Academic Year 1911-1912 

Homer H. Cooper, A. M., Superintendent 
History 

Catherine Hartman, A. B. 
, German and Mathematics 

Anna M. Painter 
Latin and English 

Lucile McIi.vaine 
Latin and Science 

Edna Macy 
Drawing 



j§>ptr£lauii Araitemg 

I H li I Z3 

I I 

HISTORY 

PIOELAND ACADEMY is the oldest academy in 
charge of the Friends in Indiana. It was chartered 
as an academy in 1870, but its history as a Friends' 
school extends over a period of eighty years. It is 
under the control of the Spiceland Monthly Meeting, by 
which body the Board of Trustees is appointed. The 
teachers are selected by ilie Trustees. While the school is 
under denominational control, it is not sectarian in the 
least; its foundation rests upon Christian culture; it has 
been kept under strong Christian influences, and its pur- 
pose is to develop practical, earnest, and active Christian 
manhood and womanhood. 

The first class graduated in 1870. The Alumni Asso- 
ciation now enrolls four hundred sixteen. About three 
thousand live hundred students have received instruction 
in the school since its organization as an academy. 

LOCATION 

Spiceland Academy is located in the beautiful towu 

-5- 




of Spiceland, Indiana, in the southern part of Henry 
county, on the Lake Erie & Western railroad, two miles 
uortli of Dunreith, on the Pennsylvania railroad. The 
buildings are situated in the midst of a beautiful grove, 
adjoiniug which is a large campus, well adapted to athletic 
sports. The interurban street-car line gives connections 
with surrounding cities. 

ENTRANCE 

Students may enter at any time, but students coining 
from other schools are required to bring certificates stat- 
ing their literary and moral standing. In the absence of 
approved certificate, examinations will be held and stu- 
dents classified accordingly. Classes in Grammar School 
branches are maintained as demand may justify, affording 
opportunity for preparatory work to students who may 
not be eligible to regular academic standing. 

The conditions for admission to the First Year class 
are the same as for entrance to the public high schools of 
this State . 

In general, a graduate from non commissioned high 
schools of this county can enter the Academy with credit 
for the number of months' work he has studied in his 
home school wherein the work is up to the standard of the 
commissioned high school. 

THE COURSE OF STUDY 

The Academy course of study has been arranged with 
two purposes in view : 

-6— 



First — It is prepared to conform to the needs and 
desires of all students who may not have the opportunity 
to pursue a college course, but who desire a practical edu- 
cation which will prepare them to lead an active and a 
successful life. 

Second — It is arranged to enable students to make the 
necessary preparation for admission in college without 
examination . 

THE ENGLISH COURSE 

The completion of the English Course will entitle one 
to a certificate of credit. It is intended for those who 
have no expectation of attending college, but who wish to 
be prepared as well as possible for their work in life. 

It is to be understood that the College Preparatory 
Course is the one required for college entrance require- 
ments. 

BIBLE STUDY 

The study of the Bible is considered of so much im- 
portance that arrangements have been made by which it 
will be taught in the Academy. The subject will be made 
an elective one. Credit will be given as in other studies. 
This will bo one of tire most valuable studies in the course 
and it is hoped many will take advantage of the work. 

STATE CERTIFICATE OF EQUIVALENCY 

The State Board of Education has given the Academy 
a Certificate of Equivalency. This enables the graduates 
to enter any college in the State without an examination. 



COURSE OF STUDY 



FIRST YEAR 



SECOND YEAR 



JUNIOR 



COLLEGE PREPARATORY 

Latin or 
German 
Algebra 
English I 
Botany or 

Physical Geography 

Caesar or German 
Geometry 
Ancient History 
English II 

Cicero or German 
Higher Algebra 
♦Modern History 
English III 
Solid Geometry 

Latin 
*U. S. History 

Physics 

English IV 
♦Nature 
*Bible 

♦Commercial Arithmetic 



Subjects marked with a star arc elective. 
1 11 ml'ii tii m to tin isc above mentioned, the fol 
Advanced linglish, English History, Music, Drawi 



ENGLISH 



SENIOR 



♦Manual Training 
♦Domestic Science 

Algebra 

English I 

Botany or 

Physical Geography 

♦Agriculture 
Geometry 
Ancient History 
English II 

♦Bookkeeping 

Algebra 
♦IVIodern History 

English III 
♦Solid Geometry 

♦Commercial Arithmetic 
*U. S. History 

Physics 

English IV 
♦Nature 
♦Bible 



OTVinft electives maybe taken: 
if?, and special electives. 



MANUAL TRAINING, AGRICULTURE, BOOKKEEPING 
The Board of Trustees is making special preparation for the teaching 
of the practical subjects demanded by the spirit of the times. Special 
courses in Manual Training, Agriculture, and Bookkeeping are offered. 
Those of our young people who do not expect to attend college may now 
have the opportunity in the Academy of securing an education in those 
subjects especially desired by them. 

Students who wish to do post-graduate work will have an excellent 
opportunity to study in elective subjects. 



Advanced classes in any of the lines of study will be 
formed whenever a sufficient number of pupils desire the 
higher work. The diploma of the Academy willadmit the 
student to any of the colleges in Indiana or of other States 
without entrance examinations. 

Higher classes in any subject or classes in subjects not 
offered will be formed whenever there is snilicient de- 
mand, and tuition will be charged, one dollar per month 
for each study. Satisfactory work in these studies may be 
substituted for work in regular course at the discretion of 
the Superintendent. 

The course of study makes provision for a number of 
electives, thus giving the student an opportunity to select 
work along the line of his preference. The thirty-two 
credits required for examination are distributed among the 
departments as follows ' Latin, seven ; English, six; His- 
tory, two; Mathematics, six ; Science, two; Elective, nine. 

It is especially urged that all pupils take the regular 
College Preparatory Course of study, and after graduation 
attend college, if possible. 

Increased advantages are offered in the arrangements 
made to take elective work in the following departments: 
Drawing, Music, and Elocution and Oratory. 

ENGLISH 

I. English Composition. 

The aim of this course is to give the student a practi- 
cal knowledge in the principles of English composition. 
Every student should be able to use correctly his own lan- 
guage both in writing and in speaking. Two recitations 

—9— 



per week are given in this study during each year of the 
Academic course. The student is required to write at 
least one short theme each week. The theme is then dis- 
cussed by the class and carefully criticised by the teacher. 

1st year — Composition and Grammar. 
2nd year — Composition and Rhetoric, 
ord year — Composition and Rhetoric. 
4th year — Term Essays and Thesis. 

II. English Literature. 

The purpose of this course is to create an interest in 
literature for its own sake and to increase the culture of 
the student by developing a love for the best in thought 
and style. This can be done only by a thorough study of 
the masterpieces of the most important English and Amer- 
ican writers. It is desired to emphasize that the reading 
of the following selections does not constitute the proper 
study of literature. The time element is important. To 
receive credit for a year's work requires nine months' 
time under the careful supervision of an experienced 
teacher. 

First Year — First semester. 1, Longfellow's Poems; 
2., Cooper's Last of the Mohicans; J$, Dickens' Christmas 
Carol, and Cricket on the Hearth; Outside Heading, Pil- 
grim's Progress, or The Deerslayer. Second semester — 
1, Whittier's Poems; 2, Hawthorne, selected; 3, Irving's 
Sketch Book; 4, Shakespeare, Merchant of Venice; Out- 
side Reading, A Man Without a Country, or Treasure 
Island. 

Second Year — First semester. 1, Scott's Ivanhoe; 2, 
Lady of the Lake; 3, Eliot's Silas Marner; 4, Coleridge 

—10— 



and Goldsmith, selected ; Outside Reading, Vicar of Wake- 
field, or Lorna Doone. Second semester — 1, The Sir Roger 
de Coverley Papers ; 2, Beowulf ; 0, Shakespeare, selected ; 
4, Browning's Poems; Outside Reading, Quentin Diir- 
ward. 

Third Year — First Semester. 1, Abernethy's Ameri- 
can Literature; 2, Lowell's Poems; 3, Emerson's Essays; 
4, Washington's Farewell Address, and Webster's Bunker 
Hill Oration ; Outside Reading, The Crisis. Second sem- 
ester — 1, Poe's Poems and Prose; 2, Howells' The Rise of 
Silas Lapham ; 15, Shakespeare, selected; Outside Read- 
ing, selected. 

Fourth Year — First semester. 1, English Literature, 
Newcomer; 2, Hamlet and Macbeth; 3, Milton's Poems; 
Home Reading, selected. Second semester — 1, Burke's 
Conciliation with the American Colonies: 2, Palgrave, 
Book IV ; Tennyson's Poems; Home Reading, selected. 

HISTORY 

The course in History is now arranged to conform to 
the recommendations of the Committee of Seven of the 
American Historical Association. 

Besides the culture value of history, it is to be re- 
membered that it is the study which furnishes the students 
the ideals of character which lead to the highest moral 
growth. The student should thoroughly understand the 
institutional life of the people studied. 

The purposes of history in the Academy are as follows : 

First — The development of moral character. History 
as the study of institutional life and of character teaches 
us to watch the progress of humanity in the rise and fall 
of nations. Success or failure in national life or in the 

—11- 



life of a person will cause us to adopt for ourselves and our 
country that which has proven of excellent worth. History 
helps us to avoid the mistakes of other people and nations. 

Second— The teaching of patriotism and the broaden- 
ing of our interests and sympathies. While we wish to 
be familiar with our own government and national charac- 
ter, we must recognize the broad principle of the universal 
brotherhood of men. 

Third — The development of our powers of judgment. 
It is here that we especially study the relation between 
cause and effect. Every statesman has been a student of 
history. In studying the problems of life which have con- 
fronted other people we are greatly aided in the .practical 
solution of the life problems of today. 

Fourth — The acquirement of useful facts. This, 
though generally considered of most importance, is in 
fact but a subordinate purpose in the study of history. 

Fifth — The gaining of a broad and practical general 
culture. The work consists of a study of Ancient History 
in the second year; a special study of Medieval and Mod- 
ern History in the third year; of English History in the 
third year; United States History and Civil Government 
in the fourth year. 

MATHEMATICS 

The aim of this study is to introduce the student to 
mathematical methods and develop in him the power to 
reason clearly and accurately mi any given problem. Al- 
gebra is studied throughout the first year of the high 
school and the first, halt' of the third year; Geometry dur- 
ing the second year and through the last half of the third 
year. A great deal of supplementary work is given in 

—12- 



Algebra, and original exercises are introduced as much as 
possible in Geometry. Arithmetic is an elective study. 

LATIN 

There is no subject in the Academy which has greater 
disciplinary value to the pupil than the study of Latin. It 
trains and strengthens the memory, cultivates and quick- 
ens the perception, and develops habits of ready, accurate 
and sound thinking. 

A very large per cent, of all the words used in the 
dictionary will be of Latin origin, therefore some knowl- 
edge of this subject is absolutely necessary for a correct 
understanding of our own English language. It gives us 
a key to a quicker understanding of all that we read or 
hear. It is essential to all who are to continue work in 
college. It is helpful to every professional man. It will 
give us a greater appreciation of the Latin writers and 
speakers. It increases our general culture and contributes 
to our broader discipline. 

The College Preparatory Course is required of all who 
expect to attend college. In general cases, to fit the stu- 
dent for college, equivalent subjects may be substituted. 

SCIENCE 

The Academy is supplied with sullicient apparatus to 
be a valuable aid in the study of natural sciences. In 
Physics the subject is illustrated by many simple pieces 
of apparatus, besides the air pump, electrical machine, 
batteries, etc. Geology and Mineralogy are illustrated by 
a collection of more than twelve hundred specimens, pre- 

—13- 



sented to the Academy by the Alumni. In Zoology and 
Botany, animals and plants are studied from nature, and 
systems of classification are made prominent. In all the 
sciences objects are used as much as possible. 

The following are the purposes of science work : 

First— To interest the pupil in the observation of na- 
ture. 

Second — To develop the power of reasoning through 
the original investigation of the truths of nature. 

Third— To give a practical knowledge of the elemen- 
tary principles of those sciences which are now, in a great 
measure, causing our rapid progress in the civilization of 
the world. 

COURSE IN MUSIC 

Vocal music will be taught by an experienced teacher. 

In the beginning course, students who have known 
nothing of music will be taught to read readily and sing 
ordinary church music Advance work will be given to 
prepare students to form and conduct chorus classes and 
to teach music in the public schools. 

GENERAL ITEMS 

The government of the school is based upon the idea 
that manhood is more than scholarship; that self-respect 
and self-control on the part of a student are important 
factors in the formation of character. Greater stress is 
laid upon the thoroughness of instruction and accuracy of 
knowledge than upon rapidity of advancement. 

For many years the health of students has been uni- 

—14- 



formly good. There is probably no better location in the 
State in this respect. 

The Friends and Methodists both hold religious servi- 
ces on the Sabbath and each maintains a Sabbath school. 
Meetings of the Young People's Society of Christian En- 
deavor and the Epworth League are held every Sabbath 
evening, and students are welcome to their meetings and 
membership. 

A sufficient number of teachers is constantly employed 
so that large classes may be avoided, and students may re- 
ceive personal attention. 

Expenses are as low as at any other school affording 
equal advantages. 

The managers of the school are very careful to make 
this an institution in which students who are away from 
home and its restraints will be surrounded by good, moral 
influences, and in this they have the co-operation of the 
citizens of the village. There are no beer, liquor or bil- 
liard saloons in the village. 

No student whose influence is known to have a cor- 
rupting tendency will be retained in the school. 

DIPLOMAS 

Students whose conduct is exemplary, and who com- 
plete the course of study and prepare and deliver a suita- 
ble literary production, will be furnished a diploma, 
signed by the instructors and the President and Secretary 
of the Board of Trustees. To receive a diploma a student 
should be in attendance at the Academy one year, except 
when special arrangements are made with the Superin- 
tendent and Board of Trustees. 

— J5- 



LECTURES 



Studeuts have the opportunity to hear good lectures 
at small expense. Addresses on various subjects are given 
during the year. 

LITERARY EXERCISES 

Literary exercises may be required of all studeuts in 
all grades, both in class work and before the public. Care 
is used that students may learn the art of composition and 
public delivery. Essays and declamations are a part of 
the regular school work in the department of oratory. 

LIBRARIES 

Five sets of encyclopedias are in the school rooms, 
and these, with the dictionaries and numerous reference 
books, are for the free use of all. There is a large library 
in connection with the school, which comprises about three 
thousand volumes. 



TEXTS USED DURING THE YEAR 



First Latin Collar and Daniel 

Classics Various Texts 

English Selections 

Rhetoric. 

English Literature Newcomer 

Algebra . Slaught and Lennes 

Geometry. _ Went worth 

Physical Geography Davis 

Physics Millikan and Gale 

Chemistry Cooley 

Astronomy Steele-Todd 

Botany.. Bergen and Bailey 



English History Wrong 

Civics Fiske 

Political Economy Walker 

U. S. History Hart 

Grammar Wisely 

Physiology.. Macy and Morris 

Ancient History West 

Modern History Myers 

American Literature Abernethy 

Grammar Latin . Bennett 

Cajsar Bennett 

Cicero Bennett 

Vergil Bennett 



EXPENSES 

RATES OF TUITION 

Academic classes for eacli study $1.00 per month 

Academic classes for two or more studies 

Special classes for each study $1.00 per month 

Students who enter at irregular times will be charged 
full tuition for the term in case they complete the term's 
work in such manner as to receive credit toward the diploma. 

Special students and others who do not expect to earn 
credit in the regular course will be charged only for the 
time of actual enrollment in the classes. 

Occasionally those who are especially strong are per- 
mitted to earn credits by outside study under the super- 
vision of the teachers. For such credits as these one-half 
the regular tuition will be charged. 

Tuition is due at the opening of "ach term, and settle- 



V 



merit should be made with the Superintendent or the 
Treasurer of the Board of Trustees. Students will receive 
no credit for their work until the tuition is paid. 



BOARDING 

The citizens of Spiceland have always given the stu- 
dents a hearty welcome by receiving them into their homes. 
The cost of boarding and rooms in private families where 
everything is furnished can be had for $-3.00 to $4.00 a 
week. 

I'ersons who may live near enough to go home at the 
end of the week, and who wish to economize, may reduce 
the cost of living to a very small sum. 

LIST OF STUDENTS 



SENIORS 



Bacon, Sadie 
Bell, Dorothv 
Chandler, Ralph 
Chew, Edith 
Conner, Ruth 
DeWitte, Gertrude 
Kwing, Russell 
Fields, Ada 
Fletcher, Paul 
Hardin, Alvin 



Buck, Mabel 
Butler, Addie 
Bundy, Marie 



Hays, Martha 
Lane, Melissa 
Macy, Mable 
Moffett, Exie 
Montgomery, Clara 
I'iersoit, Norma 
Smith, Andrea- 
Test, Rachel 
Tiioliey, Margaret 
West, Audrev 



JUNIORS 



Long, Marie 
Mercer, Mildred 
Moffitt, Hazel 



-18 



DeWitte, Olive 
Draper, Jessie 
Evaus, Anna 
Fields, Hazel 
Hall, Iris 
Hodsou, Georgia 
Riser, Floss 



Pickett, Leonora 
Sellers, Lydia 
Stubbs, Raymond. 
Swain, Mary 
Swindell, Fave 
Waddell, Zofa 
Wilson, Ercel 



SOPHOMERES 



Black, Marie 
Brown, Harold 
Cott, Edith 
Caldwell, Corenne 
Daugherty, Helen 
Ewing, Cortez 
Haisley, L'auline 
Hardin, Fred 
Huiford, George 



Cramer, Paul 
Evans, Dorris 
Hall, Wan eta 
llanna, Marie 
Hill, Louise 
Leigh, Howard 
Luthultz, Mabel 



Jarrett, Curl 
McDaniel, Irene 
Mcllvaine, Albert 
Modlin, Marie 
Fen nington, Agnes 
Pickering, Vivian 
Shepherd, Maurine 
Trobuugh, Leslie 



FRESHMEN 



Luthultz, Lorine 
Millikan, Carroll 
Pickering, Irene 
Reece, Paul 
Rifner, Floyd 
Stewart, Mildred 
Toohey, Carl 



IRREGULAR 



Copeland, Donald 
Cochran, Ruby 



Delon, Floyd 



LIST OF ACADEMY SUPERINTENDENTS 



Clarkson Davis 1863-1867 

Edward Taylor 1867-1868 

Clarkson Davis 1868 1874 

Timothy Wilson 1874-1876 

Clarkson Davis 1876-1882 

Thomas- N'ewlin 1882- 1883 

Timothy Wilson — ...1883-1885 

Thomas Newlin 1885-1892 

J. FraDk Brown .. 1892-1893 

Arthur W. Jones L 1893-1894. 

George W. Neet 1894-1898- 

Murray S. Wildman 1898-1901 

M. S. Woods 1901-1903 

Homer H. Cooper 19O3- 



ALUMNI 

OFFICERS FOR 1912-191.3 

President .. 

Vice-President 

Secretary 

Treasurer 

Executive Com mitt 

Orator. 

Vice-Orator 

Historian 

Yice-1 lisiorian 

Those marked (*) are deceased. 



Oscar Boguc 

Ross Williams- 

Ruba Cochran 

Kerney Wilson 

( Isidore Wilson 
- Paul Wilson 
( Margaret Toohey 
..John R. Hinshaw 

Kuth Hudelsora 

Klyii Hall 

..(!( rirude Seaford 



1870 *Eli U. Cook . 
John J. Stubbs 



-20- 



Omaha, Neb 



1871 *Walter D. Jones 

*Alvin H. Jenkins. __ 

*I. Macy Good 

C. R. Dixon Paonia, Col 

R. G. Boone.. New York City 

Dallas Sisson Spiceland 

Mary Ballenger ( Barnard) New Castle 

Louisa Wickersham Lewisville R F D I 

Lida Edwards (Saint) New Castle 

1872 Lindley H. Johnson .Dunreith 1 

**David Henley 

Jacob Hill 

Henry W. Painter New Castle, R F D I 

Robert G. Mitchell Pacific Grove, Ca! 

1873 *Sadie D. Talbert (Wright) 

Aaron B. Bell- Springtown, Ark 

*J. Tilman Hutchins 

John Pennington Damascus, O 

Mary Stubbs (Painter) New Castle, R F D I 

Nathan Williams Oswego, Kan 

S. Carrie Talbert (Newby) Wichita, Kan 

1871 Alice Coffin (Russell) New York City 

A I vira Spencer (Harold) Indianapolis 

J. P. Edwards Knightstown 

William S. Moffifl . Kennard 

Edwin O. Kennard Pasadena Cal 

Nathan Rosenberger ... Muscatine, Iowa 

W. E. Jackson . ... Knightstown 

D. C. Mitchell Spiceland 

1875 W.W.Gregg, Indianapolis 

William Pidgeon __ Bloomington 

Irvin Stanley Westrield 

1877 Milton Roberts .. Linnv ille, Iowa 

1878 S. Klla liogue (Dogget) Danville, Va 

Belle Chambers (Baily) Richmond 

J. Pinkney Mitchell Seattle, Wash 

Thomas Mitchell Knightstown, R F D i 



—21— 



Flora Moore (Brady) Lincolnville 

John O. Reed Ann Arbor, Mich 

*\Yilliam Seaford 

Fannie Thornburg (Parsons) Oak Park, III 

1879 J. A. Buck Terre Haute 

Carrie Goodwin (Jeffrey) New Castle 

Thomas Newlin Whittier, Cal 

1880 J. Edgar Cloud Louisville, Ky 

Wm. N. Lamb San Francisco, Cal 

Mattie Lamb Outland Amboy 

Ada Grace Murphy Chattanooga, Tenn 

Ida May Roberts Westfield 

Emma Belle Roberts Westfield 

Frank Syrr.ons _. Portland, Maine 

Lamira Trueblood (Kellum) Camby 

1881 Oscar R. B^ker Winchester 

*Corrie Bogue 

Minnie Benedict ( Blankenship( ...Paragon 

Carrie I'nthank (Kellum) Indianapolis 

*Jessie Stratton 

1882 *Arthur H. Baily 

J. Newton Barnard Daleville 

Harriet Bogue ( Xewlin) Indianapolis 

Hauie E. Dickinson Spiceland 

Charles Newlin Indianapolis 

1883 Anna Hudelson (Foster) Washington, 1) C 

Ryland Ratliff Danville 

Julia Stafford (Newby) New Castle, R F D 2 

Emily Weeks Middletown, R F D 1 

1884 *Cora Kirk 

Ella Siration (Hodson) New Castle, R F D 10 

Virginia Griffin (Cory) Dunreith 

Isadore Hall (Wilson) . Spiceland 

William Julian.... Hastings, Neb 

Charles Newby ..Converse 

1885 Mary L. Brown (Pennington) Spiceland 

Alfred V. King Mt. Vernon, 111 

Oliver C. Steele ... Spiceland 



-22— 



1886 L. Winnie Baily (Clement) Haddonfield, N J 

Mattie E. Brown Daytonia, Fla 

Richard Broadbent Ehvood 

Elbert Griffin _ . Elwood 

Alonzo C. Hodson New Castle, R F D 10 

*John L. McNew 

Russell Ratliff. .Marion 

1887 Herbert T. Baily Spiceland 

Clarence H. Beard Indianapolis 

Anna K. Bogue (Shaffer) Benton Harbor, Mich 

Lindley Compton Tomah, Wis 

Elizabeth S. Hiatt (Geneau) Omaha, Neb 

Abraham Miller Seymour 

Bert Smith Zionsville 

1888 Rhoda Ballenger (Cunningham) . ..Indianapolis 

*Hannah Brown (Stribhling) 

Oryntha Brown (Jester) Pavton, Iowa 

*Jessie Butler. 

Clara G. Edwards (Knight) St. Louis, Mo 

John C. Cook New Castle 

Elva Elliottt (Compton).. ..Tomah, Wis 

Achsah E. Ratcliff (Ratliff) .'jiasadena, Cal /' 

H. H. Ray] Muncie 

Charles Stubbs 1 ...Frankfort 

J. A. Greenstreet New Castle 

H. H. Ratcliff... Connersville 

1889 Laura Benedict Indianapolis 

Blanch Braddock (McNew) Greenfield 

Frank Copeland Dunreith 

Estella Deem (Kennedy) Spiceland 

*Lawrence Gardner 

Gertrude Gordon (Geneaux) ... Victoria, Texas 

Sue Griffin (Evans) .... .Spiceland 

Otis Stubbs .. Lewisville, R F D 

May White Pasadena, Cal 

1890 L. Etta Butler Lewisville, R P' D 

Elmer Deem... Frankfort 

Edwin B. Ratcliff . Spiceland 



-23- 



Bennie Stratton New Castle, R F D i 

S. E. Stubbs Wilkinson 

1891 Ethel E. Copeland (Lee) Meadville, Pa 

Louie Edmundson (Poe) New Castle 

Maurine Gardner (Kern) Cadiz 

Charles N. Hardy Markleville 

Alice Hiatt (Copeland) Cincinnati, O 

Ernest Sisson ..Greenfield 

Alfred H. Symons . Supai, Ariz 

Mary M. Teas (Parker) Eaton, O 

Charles Titus Warrington 

Herbert 1). Woodard Chicago, 111 

1892 Jesse S. Baily . . . _Sil verton, Col 

Clara Brown Spiceland 

Warren T. Evans Canby, Minn 

John B. Greenstreet Lewisville, R F D 

Winnie Hinshaw Milligan Winchester 

David M. Kemp Kempton 

Alice Lawrence Spiceland 

Estella Symons Minneapolis, Minn 

Alvin Ulrich Greensboro 

1893 Oscar Bogue .Spiceland 

Estella Charles (Fawcett) Indianapolis 

Floy Hill - .Pasadena, Cal 

Arthur Holloway Oskaloosa, Iowa 

Leora Jessup (Parker) Westland 

John Miller ... .New Castle 

*Olen Payne 

Lena Rayle A /..•..' Spiceland 

George Smith Knightstown 

Orville White - Joplin, Mo 

1894 Minnie Black (Moore) Chicago, 111 

Bessie I. ISrown (Stone) Daytona, Fla 

Clarence V . Hall New Castle 

Horace Hardy Markleville 

Ida Hoilowav (Kenworthy) Richmond 

Arlie Hood Chicago, 111 

Bertha Jessup... Clay Center, Neb 

-24— 



Elma Lawrence . _. Spiceland 

Maud M. Shaffer ( Payne )il0.LiAj-C-f- New Castle 

Frank Pitts ..Indianapolis 

Oscar F. Symons Benton Harbor, Mich 

1895 Clarence Painter ..Van Buren, Ark 

Mabel Wright (Gaar) Cambridge City 

Edgar Cox Clarkton, N C 

♦Nellie Ratliff 

Howard Henley Tutile, Okla 

Maud Wildman (Evans) . Philadelphia, Pa 

Frank Hudelson Mays 

*Pearl Moffett (Wood) 

1896 Cora Hudson ( Bogue) . _ Spiceland 

Clara White (Wildman) Selma, O 

Elsie Hudelson ( Holland) ... Brooklyn 

Anna Morris (Wilson) . South Wabash 

Pearl M. Janus (Tweedy) Wabash 

■ Mabel Newhy ( Hood ) . Chicago 

W. J. Carson.. .. New York 

Nor* Griffin (Beach). ... New Castle 

Theresa Wildman . ... Philadelphia, Pa 

Roscoe Edwards .: ..' New Castle 

1897 Leoti Applegate (Coffin).^ .Spiceland 

Elva M. Hudson ( Hall ) Spiceland 

Lois M. Henley Indianapolis 

*Fannie Hayes. 

Floy Hudelson Greenfield 

Josie B. Barlan (Weatherman) _ ... Dana 

Jessie Leaky (Hi itt). New Lisbon 

Pearl Millikan (Hardy) . Markleville 

Ethel Rifner (Kewb) ) .Englewoo l, Kan 

Mayme Stafford (Applegate) .Spiceland 

Clyde Sisson (Moore) , Indianapolis 

Minnie Stratton (Stafford) New Castle, R F O 1 

Charles H. Smith Philadelphia, Pa 

V.T rv,n S White 

1898 Clifford Applegate Spiceland 

James Holtsclaw Spiceland 

-25- 



Bavis Nay Danville 

. Emory Ratcliff New Castle, R F D 

Gertrude Seaford Spiceland 

Pearl Symons Spiceland 

Lelia Smith (Rice) Spencer, O 

Charles A Heard ' New York City 

Merritt Stafford Carthage 

Cora Smith (Sparks) Summitville 

Walter Painter .... Crown Point 

Bertha Charles (Hewitt) Harlem, Mont 

Ernest Shockley Angola 

Elsie Shockley (Lockridge) Shawnee, Okla 

1899 Bessie Haisley Spice. and 

Bertha 0. Lawrence Gibara, Cuba 

Florence 0. Macy (Parker) Carthage 

Earl Mol'fett . Knightstown, R F 1) 2 

Walter '1'. Pearce Rushville 

Orabell Shaffer (Bell) New Castle, R F I) 2 

1900 Ethel Applegate ( Painter). Spiceland 

Edgar Ba/.zle New Castle 

Susan Benedict (Nay) .....Danville 

Cora Charles (Carson) ..Crete 

Connie Griffin Ogden 

David W. Gordon St. Louis 

Guy H. Hall New Lisbon 

Cljde Kennedy Berkley, Cal 

Clarence Macy. Scott City, Kan 

Everett Macy ..Scott City, Kan 

Carroll Mills Kirkvilie, Mo 

Cecil Newby . Englewood, Kan 

*Jeanette Rilner.. - 

Pernia Thornburg (Griffin) Merino, Col 

John R. Thompson .... New Castle 

1901 Ira E. Bell New Castle, R F D 2 

Bertha E. Butler (Ballard) Lewisville 

Raymond Byrket Lewisville 

Jennie Compton (Cope) . Dunreith 

Everette Cope " Dunreith 

—26- 



Deborah Edwards Knightstown, R F D 

Ethel Edwards (Kramein) Bloomington, III 

Lillian H. Hayes . Dunreith 

Walter B. Harvey . . Pittsburg, Pa 

John R. Hinshaw New Castle 

Everest Macy. . Scoit City, Kan 

Georgia Millikan (Hardy) . Pendleton 

Jennie E. Millikan (Wright) Edinburg 
Homer Nugen . .. Lewisville 

LUra E. Risk ( Deem) .. Spiceland 

Robert A. Roberts . New Albany 

Grace E. Stewart .d&lui UMtll Greenfield 

Russell L.Wright . .... ... Portland, Oregon 

Walter C. Wilson . ... Pasadena, Cal 

1902 Harley Anderson Spiceland 

Jessie Baily Spiceland 

Mary Butler New Castle, R F D 1 

Walter Byers..,., . . . Knightstown, R F D 2 

Jennie Kirk . lA New Castle 

Guerney Maple Pasadena, Cal 

Manning Smith . Philadelphia, Pa 

Rena Thomas. ... Fountain City 

Retta Thomas , Matamoras, Mex 

Russell Wilson Whittier, Cal 

India Yost (Cook) Sulphur Springs 

1903 Rilla Bartlett (Han ey) Pittsburg, Pa 

Nellie Beckett Spiceland 

Perriti Holt Indianapolis 
Arthur Johnson Lewisville 
Carl Newby . Mulh.all, Oklahoma 

Rupert Redic . HI Prtso, Tex 

Ralph Stubbs ... Spiceland 

Walter Wright Edinburg 

1904 Elsie Bell (Applegate) . Spiceland 

Josephine Beeson (Niles) Spiceland 

Will Benedict _ Ann Arbor, Mich 

Lawrence Bridges Knightstown 

Warren Edwards .. ..Knightstown, R F D 



—27- 



Irl Evans Mt. Summit 

Jessie Gordon (Newby) T Spiceland 

Ruth Harvey Dunreith 

Hazel Heacock (Yockey)... Spiceland 

Homer Henley Muskogee, Okla 

Claire Hoover (May) Indianapolis 

Barton Jones Spiceland 

Belva Jordan (Coffin) New Castle, RFDi 

Guy May ._ .. Indianapolis 

Pansy Newby ' Lewisville 

Anna Fainter New Castle, R F D I 

Clara Patterson (Rothrock) New Castle, RFDl 

Lois Pitts Morristovvn, R F I) 

Wendell Pitts Morristown, R F D 

Lawrence Reeves Knightstown 

Robert Reeves Wilkinson 

Etta Rifner (Parker) Indianapolis 

John Rogers Mooreland 

♦Herbert Sea lord - ■ 

Ralph Silver Knightstown 

Bernetha Smith Muncie 

Charles Veach - Mt. Summit 

Ethel Wright (Hershaur) Dunreith 

Harold Vockey Oklahoma City, Okla 

1905 Elsie Anderson (Conwell) .. Mooreland 

Walter Brandy Spiceland 

Raymond Duke Indianapolis 

Alexander Gano. Indianapolis 

Oran Griffin Indianapolis 

Ruth Gardner New Castle, R F D 1 

Elva Kennard (Mueller) New Castle 

Aura Lane .' Spiceland 

Edward Pope ....New Castle, R F 1)6 

Jessie Reece... Long Beach, Cat 

Ruby Reeves Knightstown 

Anna Reeves ..Wilkinson, R F D 2 

*Arthur Rilner 

Arden Stubbs.. New Castle 

Everett Test - Spiceland 

-28- 



Amy Thomas (Sherry) 
Paul Wilson 



...Willow 
Spiceland 



3906 Charles Bundy 1 . Spiceland 

Walter Bundy Spiceland 

Arthur Hudelson .. New Castle, R F D 

Hazel Hudelson.. Dunreith 

*Edna Kellar -- 

Frances Nugen ... Hagerstown 

Myron Painter .. . .. Spiceland 

Edgar Rogers ... . Mooreland 

Otis Shaffer . . Richmond 

Maud Simmons ( Bolin) Zanesville, O 

Grover VanDine . Shirley 

Orville Wright New Castle, R F D 



4907 Hazel Bartlett . ...Lewisville 

Irene Bell (Wright) Greensboro 

Bertha Bowers ( Rogers) .. ..Mooreland 

Ruby McDaniel ( Rutherslord) Rushville, R F D 

Levinus Painter New Castle, R F D 

Howard Seaford __ .. Spiceland 

Clenna Smith (Moffitt) Lewisville 

Hassel Williams . Indianapolis 



1908 Herschel All Lewisville 

Clara Burcham ... . . New Castle, R F D 10 

Ethel Chandler Spiceland 

Loma Delon .Spiceland 

Margaret Harden Knightstown, R F D 

Ruby Julian (Reece) Washington, D C 

Everett Kennard Knightstown, R F D 

Glenn Kirkham ._ Rushville, R F D 9 

Paul McDaniel Knightstown, R F I) 3 

Vida Redic Cloiidcroft, New Mexico 

Hazel Reese New Ostle, R F D9 

Bessie Sidwell St. Clairsville, O 

Mary Seaford (All) . Lewisville 

Edna Swindell Greensboro 

Lucile Wilson Pasadena, Cal 



-29- 



1909 Beula Arnold New Castle, RF D6 

Loren Butler Spiceland 

Marie Clarke Greenwood 

Walter Hays Markleville 

Ruth Hudelson New Castle, R F D io 

Ethel Jackson (Clayton) Straughn 

Ada Jarrett Spiceland 

Lucile Mcllvaine Lewisville 

James McGrady . New Castle 

Griffin Moffitt Knightstown, R F D 

Alma Osborn .Winchester, R F D 

Elgar Pennington .... ... Spiceland 

Hoyt Reese Whittier, Cal 

Hazel Skaates Lewisville 

Minnie Simmons. .Wilkinson 

Margaret Smith Columbus, O 

Clayton Teeter Mooreland 

Ross Williams Dimreith 

Terry Wilson .' Spiceland 

1910 Mary Antrim.. — ..Spiceland 

Helen Bartletl ...Lewisville 

Clarence Cartwrigbt Lewisville 

Nettie Grissom - New Castle 

Marie Hendricks Straughn 

Bernice Henshaw Dunreith 

Mary Jessup . - Modoc 

Minnie Riser (Boyd) Dunreith 

Andrew Markle - . Shirley 

Ruth May Straughn 

Ruth Moffett Knightstown, R F D 

Clarence Rich Mays, R F D 25 

Hazel Seaford Spiceland 

Lena Shi vely Mt. Summit 

William Smith Columbus, O 

Edith Stigleman (Moffitt) Knightstown, R V I) 

Leanna Taylor „ .- — Spiceland 

Ralph I'est NewCastle, R K D 1 

Kerney Wilson Spiceland 

—30- 



1911 Roy Brown Spiceland 

Howard Caldwell Indianapolis 

Hazel Cochran _ Spiceland 

Ruba Cochran .... ..'.'.-.•.•j.. J Spiceland 

Ralph Evans. Spiceland 

Decil Fields Spiceland 

Ruth Harvey Spiceland 

Howard Harvey .New Castle 

Clarence Hoffman. Spiceland 

Myra Hunnicutt . ./3 — Economy 

Margaret Hunnicutt ... Economy 

Giace Myers .. New Castle, R F I) 

Myra Painter .... Richmond 

Everett Pennington . . . Spiceland 

Erma l'ierson (Smullen) ..Lewisville 

Rex 1'otterf Lewisville 

Merwin Symons ...Lewisville 

Ernestine Williams (Millikan) New Castle 



-31- 




SP1CELAND ACADEMY 

SPICELAND, INDIANA 



FACULTY AND CALENDAR 



For the Academic Year 1914-1015 



INSTRUCTORS 



HOMER H. COOPER, A. 111., Superintencli rit 
History 

Anna Painter, A. B. 
English and Vocal Music 

Barclay Morris, A. B. 
Mathematics and Science 

Clara Kendall, A. B. 
Language and Science 

Mrs. Adella H. Ratcliff 
Pianoforte 

I 



CALENDAR 



1914 

Fall Term begins Tuesday,' September 8 
Fall Term ends Thursday, December 24 

1915 

Winter Term begins Monday, January 4 
Winter Term ends Friday, March 19 

Spring Term begins Monday, March 29 
Commencement, Friday, May 28 



BOARD OF TRUSTEES 



Edwin B. Ratcliff, President 

Jesse Bell, Secretary and Treasurer 

John S. Griffin 

Seth C. Symons 

Charles B. Harvey 

George Evans I 



INSTRUCTORS 



Academic Year 1913-1914 

Homer H. Cooper, A. M., Superintendent 
History 

Anna Painter, A. B. 
English and Music 

Barclay Morris, A. B. 
Mathematics and Science 



Clara Kendall, A, B. 
Latin and German 



Spiceland Academy 



HISTORY 

SPICELAND ACADEMY is the oldest academy in charge of the 
Friends in Indiana. It was chartered as an academy in 1870, 
but its history as a Friends' school extends over a period of 
eighty years. It is under the control of the Spiceland 
Monthly Meeting, by which the Hoard of Trustees is appointed. The 
teachers are selected by the Trustees. While the school is under 
denominational control, it is not sectarian in the least; its founda- 
tion rests upon Christian culture; it has been kept under strong 
Christian influences, and its purpose is to develop practical, ear- 
nest, and active Christian manhood and womanhood. 

Tfte first class graduated in 1870. The Alumni Association now 
enrolls four hundred fifty. About three thousand five hundred 
students have received instruction in the school since its organiza- 
tion as an academy. The Course of Study and the Methods of 
teaching aiv kepi conservative in character and thoroughly pro- 
gressive in spirit 

LOCATION 

Spiceland Academy is located in the beautiful town of Spice- 
land, Indiana, in the southern part of Henry county, on the Lake 
Erie & Western railroad, two miles north of Dunreith, on the 
Pennsylvania railroad. The buildings are situated in the*midst of 



a beautiful grove, adjoining which is a large campus, well adapted 
to athletic sports. The interurban strset-ear line gives connections 
with surrounding cities. 

Spiceland Academy has a new and thoroughly modern building 
— well heated — well lighted and ventilated. Besides the gymna- 
sium it lias ton commodious rooms all devoted to high school pur- 
poses The 100ms for Sciences, Manual training, and Domestic 
Science arc especially suited for their purposed. The sanitary 
water supply system is used. The library has been brought up to 
date and is one of the finest reference libraries in similar second- 
ary schools. In the new building there is an abundance of room 
for tiu a regular recitations and for prevocational work. Excellent 
equipment lias been furnished for the proper teaching of all sub- 
jects for secondary schools. The building has been arrang d and 
every facility given for keeping Spiceland Academy in the very 
highest v:\i\k <>1 schools. 

ENTRANCE 

Students may enter at any time, but students coming from 
other schools are required to bring certificates slating their liter- 
ary and moral standing. In the absence of approved certificate, 
examinations will be held and students classified accordingly. 

The conditions for admission to the First Year class are the 
same as for entrance to the public high schools of this state. 

In general, a graduate from mm commissioned high schools of 
tliis county can enter the Academy with credit for the number of 
months' work he has studied in his home school wherein the work 
is up to the standard of the commissioned high school. 

THE COURSE OF STUDY 

The Academy Course of Study conforms to the requirements 
of the State Board of Education. In addition many elective sub- 
jects are offered, and thus a student may prepare tor any college, 
or more thoroughly equip himself for his life's work. The Course 
of Study has been arranged with two purposes in view: - 

First. It Is pr-parcd to conform to the needs and desir » of 
all students who may not have the opportunity to pursue a college 
course, but who desire a practical education which will pre;raie 
them to lead an active and a successful life. 

Second— It is arranged to enable students to make the n.cess- 
ary preparation for admission in college without examination. 

6 



THE ENGLISH COURSE 

The completion of the English Course will entitle one to a 
certificate of credit. It is intended for those who have no expecta- 
tion of attending college, but who wish to be prepared as well as 
possible for their work in life. 

It is to be understood that the College Preparatory Course is 
the one required lor college entrance requirements. 

BIBLE STUDY 

The study of the Bible is eonsid red of so much importance 
that arrangements have been made by which it will be taught in 
the Academy. The subject will be made an elective one. Credit 
will be given as in other studies. This will be one of the most 
"aluable studies in the course and it is hoped many will take ad- 
vanage of the work. 

STATE CERTIFICATE OF EQUIVALENCY 

The State Hoard of Education has given the Academy a Certi- 
ficate of Equivalency. This enables the graduates to enter any 
college in the State without an examination. 

First Year Second Year Junior Senior 



English 
Amer. Hist, 
and Civics 



Latin 
German 
Physics 
Arithemetic J /& 
year. 

Bible, y 2 year 
English ilist. 
Nature study, 
or any subject 
not taken in 
1st, 2nd or 3rd 
years. 

(Any two) 



In addition to those mentioned above, the following elective* 
may bo taken: Advanced English, Vocal or Instrumental Music, 
Drawing, Agriculture, Bookkeeping, Trigonometry, Chemistry, 
Astronomy, Business I. aw, Political Economy, Typewriting, Mechan- 
ical Drawing, or any special elective. 

1 

7 

! 



Re- 
quir'd 



English 
Algebra 



English 
Geometry 
Ancient Hist. 



'nglish 



Elect 
ive 



Latin 

German 

Botany 

Domestic Sci. 
Manual Train. 
Phys. Geogr'y 
(Any two) 



a tin 
German 
Domestic Sci. 
Manual Train. 

— or — 
Any of first 
yr. not taken. 

(Any one) 



Latin 
German 
Algebra y s yr. 
Solid Geome- 
try y s year. 
Manual Train. 
Domestic Sci. 
Modern Hist. 
Any of first or 
second years 
not taken. 

( Any three) 



MANUAL TRAINING, AGRICULTURE, BOOKKEEPING 



The Board of Trustees is making special preparation lor the 
teaching of the practical subjects demanded by the spirit of the 
times. Special courses in Manual Training, Domestic Science, 
Agriculture, and Bookkeeping are offered. Those of our young 
people who do not expect to attend college may now have the op- 
portunity in the Academy of securing an education in those sub- 
jects especially desired by them. 

Students who wish to do post-graduate work will have an ex- 
cellent opportunity to study in elective subjects. 

Advanced classes in any of the lines of study will be formed, 
whenever a sufficient number of pupils desire the higher work. 
The diploma of the Academy will admit the student to any of the 
colleges in Indiana or of other States without entrance examina- 
tions. 

Higher classes in any subject or classes in subjects not offered 
will be formed whenever there is sufficient demand, and tuition will 
be charged, one dollar per month for each study. Satisfactory work 
in these studies may be substituted for work in regular course at 
the discretion of the Superintendent. 

The course of study makes provision for a number of electives, 
thus, giving the student an opportunity to select work along the 
i line of his preference. 

It is especially urged that all pupils take the regular College 
Preparatory Course of study, and after graduation attend college, 
if possible. 

Increased advantages are offered in the arrangements made to 
take elective work in the following departments: Drawing, Music, 
ami 1'revocational work. 

ENGLISH. 

1. English Composition. 

The aim of this course is to give the student a practical 
knowledge jn the principles of English composition. Every student 
should be able to use correctly his own language both in writing 
and in speaking. Two recitations per week are given in this study 
during each year of the Academic-course. The student is required 
to write at least one short theme each week. The theme is then 



8 



discussed by the class and carefully criticised by the teacher. 

1st year— Composition and Grammar. 
2nd year — Composition and Rhetoric. 
3rd year — Composition and Rhetoric. 
4th year — Term Essays and Rhetoric. 

II. English Literature. 

The purpose of this course is to create an interest in literature 
for its own sake and to increase the culture of the student by 
developing a love for the best in thought and style. This can be 
done only by a thorough study of the masterpieces of the most im- 
portant English and American writers. It is desired to emphasize 
that the reading of the following selections does not constitute the 
proper study of literature. The time element is important. To 
receive credit for a year's wcrk requires nine months' time under 
the careful supervision of an experienced teacher. 

Firs! Year. I, Longfellow's Poems; Stevenson's Treasure Is- 
land; Dicken's Christmas Carol and Cricket on the Hearth. Out- 
side Reading, Pilgrim's Progress; The Deerslayer or Man Without 
a Country. II, Whittier's Poems; Hawthorne's Wonder Book; 
Shakespeare's Merchant of Venice, Irving's Sketch Book. Out- 
side Reading, The House of Seven Cables or Tom Brown at Rugby. 

Second Year. I, Scott's Ivanhoe; Lady of, the Lake; Eliot's Si- 
las Marner. Outside Reading, The Vicar of Wakefield or Lorna 
Doone. II, Sir Roger DeCoverley Papers; Beowulf, Shakespeare's 
Julius Caesar; Swift's Gulliver's Travels. Outside Reading, The 
Talisman; Quintin Durward; A Tale of Two Cities; David Copper- 
field; Old Curiosity Shop. 

Third Year. I. Lowell's I'oenis; Washington's Farewell Ad- 
dress; Webster's Hunker Hill Oration; Hawthorne's Twieetold 
Tales. Outside Reading, The Crisis or the Crossing or The Virgin- 
ian. II, Poe's Poems and Tales; Emerson's Manners, Friendship 
and Other Essays; Shakespeare's As You Like It; Moody, Lovett 
and Boynton's First View of American Literature. Outside Read- 
ing, The Rise of Silas Lapham or The Oregon Trail. 

Fourth Year. I. Moody, Lovett and Boynton's First View of 
English Literature; Shakespeare's Hamlet; Macbeth and A Mid- 
summer Night's Dream; Milton's Short Poems. II. Burke's Con- 
ciliation with the American Colonies; Tennyson's Poems; Palgrave 
Hook III. Outside Reading for the year, Any two of the follow- 
ing: — David Copp?rfield ; The Last Days of Pompeii; Vanity Fair; 

<» 



Hypatia; Kenilworth; A Tale of Two Cities; The Old Curiosity 
Shop; The Mill on the Floss; Pendehnis, Pride and Prejudice. 

HISTORY. 

The course in History is now arranged to conform to the re- 
commendations of the Committee of Seven of the American His- 
torical Association. 

Besides the culture value of history, it is to be remembered 
that it is the study which furnishes the students the ideals of 
character which lead to the highest moral growth. The student 
should thoroughly understand the institutional life of the people 
studied. 

The purposes of history in the Academy are as follows: 

First — The development of moral character. History as the 
study of institutional life and of character teaches us to watch the 
progress of humanity in the rise and fall of nations. Success or 
failure ill national life or in the life of a person will cause us lo 
adopt for ourselves and our country that which has proven of ex- 
cellent worth. History helps us to avoid the mistakes of other 
people and nations. 

Second — The teaching of patriotism and the broadening of our 
interests and sympathies. While we wish to be familiar with our 
own government and national character, we must recognize the 
broad principle of the universal brotherhood of men. 

Third — The development of our powers of judgment. It is 
here that we especially study the relation between cause and ef- 
fect. Every statesman has been a student of history. In studying 
the problems of life which have confronted other people we are 
greatly aided hi the practical solution of the life problems of to- 
day. 

Fourth -The acquirement of useful facts. This, though gen- 
erally considered of most importance, is in fact but a subordinate 
purpose in the study of history. 

Fifth—The gaining of a broad and practical general culture. 
The work consists of a study of Ancient History in the second 
year; a special study of Medieval and Modern History in the third 
year; of English History in the third year; United States History 
and Civil Government in the fourth year. 

MATHEMATICS. 

The aim of this study is to introduce the student to mathema- 
tical methods and develop in him the power to reason clearly and 



10 



accurately on any given problem. Algebra is studied throughout the 
first year of the high school and the first half of the third year; 
Geometry during the second year and through the last half of the 
third year. A great deal of supplementary work is given in Alge- 
bra, and original exercises are introduced as much as possible in 
Geometry. Arithmetic is an elective study. 

LATIN. 

Th?re is no subject in the Academy which has greater disci- 
plinary value to the pupil than the study of Latin. It trains and 
strengthens the memory, cultivates and quickens the perception, 
and develops habits of ready, accurate and sound thinking. 

A very large per cent, of all the words used in the dictionary 
will be of Latin origin, therefore some knowledge of this subject 
is absolutely necessary for a correct understanding of our own 
English language. It gives us a key to a quicker understanding 
of all that we read or hear. It is essential to all who are to con- 
tinue work in college. It is helpful to every professional man. It 
will give us a greater appreciation of the Latin writers and speak- 
ers. It increases our general culture and contributes to our broad- 
er discipline. 

The College Preparatory Course is required of all who expect 
to attend college. In general cases, to fit the student for college, 
equivalent subjects may be tiiibstii.itei. 

SCIENCE. 

Prevocational Studies. 

In Domestic Science one year's work will be given. This will 
consist of the following: 

I. A study of foods and their preparation. 

II. Sewing. 

III. House Furnishing. 

IV. Laundry Work. 

V. Hygiene- study of the care of the body — of diseases, etc. 
In Manual Training, there will be a study of the elements of 

mechanical drawing and wood finishing. There will be the prac- 
tical construction of various useful articles. 

The principles of Agriculture will consist of the study of Soils 
and fertility of farm and garden crops, of horticulture, dairying and 
husbandry. 

In all prevocational work the student will have the very best 
opportunity of learning the practical side of the work. Each of 



11 



these studies will be given five days in the week throughout the 
year. 

The Academy is supplied with sufficient apparatus to be a 
valuable aid in the study of na*ural sciences. In Physics the sub- 
ject is illustrated by many simple pieces of apparatus, besides the 
air pump, electrical machine, batteries, etc. Ceology and Mineral- 
ogy are illustrated by a collection of more than twelve hundred 
specimens, presented to the Academy by the Alumni. In Zoology 
and Botany, animals and plants are studied from nature, and sys- 
tems of classification are made prominent. In all the sciences ob- 
jects are used as much as possible. 

The following are the purposes of science work: 

First — To interest the pupil in the observation of nature. 

Second— To develop the po\v:'r of reasoning through the ori- 
ginal investigation of the truths of nature. 

Third — To give a practical knowledge of the elementary princi- 
ples of those sciences which are now, in a great measure, causing 
our rapid progress in the civilization of the world. 

COURSE IN MUSIC. 

Both vocal and instrumental music will be taught by exper- 
ienced teachers and credit will be given for the completion of the 
required work. 

hi instrumental music the student may need to take, a pre- 
paratory course before beginning the work for which the Academy 
will give credit. 

The work rerpiired of students in the first y?ar of college work, 
or its equivalent, will furnish the standard for the work in the 
Academy. ICaoh candidate lor credit should complete sufficient 
work to enable him to appear in public recitals. 

In the Piano Course (he fimdaiu "lltal purpose will be to supply 
complete (raining in the literature of pianoforte music as repre- 
sented by the degree of advancement attained in each grade, and 
bo to instill a love for the best in music, that the amateur as well 
as tha more serious student, will find the work comprehensive. 

The work will be based upon: 

1. Mason's System of Fundamental Technics. 

2. A knowledge of Scale Formation and chord construction. 

3. Studies from such noted teachers and composers as Heller, 



Czerny, Bertini, for gaining fluency and assurance in playing and 
sight-reading. 

4. Sonatas and compositions from modern and classic com- 
posers. And — 

5. The training of musical memory, and the preparation of 
compositions for recital use. 

Tuition charges to students taking piano music will be extra, 
but much Ipss than tuition for the same work elsewhere. 

Private lessons, of one hour, or two of thirty minutes each, per 
week, will be given, as needed, for which the tuition will be $10. 
in advance per semester. This price includes the study of theory 
and history of music, which studies will be required of students of 
the piano. 

In vocal music the work will consist of the following: 

1. The development of the voice through the training of the 
ear to the appreciation of perfect tones. 

2. The studies in the oratorios and songs from the masters of 
music. 

Ii. A study of the history and development of music having in 
view both the acquaintance and appreciation of music. 

4. A study of the nature and tendency of modern music as 
selected from the b ;st of modern composers. 

5. Special chorus singing leading to some public performances. 

GENERAL ITEMS. 

The government of the school is based upon the idea that 
manhood is more- than scholarship; that self-respect and self-con- 
trol on the part of a student are important factors in the forma- 
tion of character. (!rentir stress is laid upon (lie thoroughness of 
instruction and accuracy of knowledge than upon rapidity of ad- 
vancen cut . 

For many years the health of students has been uniformly 
good. There is probably no better location in the State in this 
respect. 

The Fri nds and Methodist both hold religious services on the 
Sabbath and each maintains a Sabbath school. Meetings of the 
Young People's Society of Christian Endeavor and the Epworth 
League are held every Sabbath evening, and students are welcome 
to their M eetings and membership. 

A sufficient number of teachers is constantly employed so that 

1.3 



large classes may be avoided, and students may receive personal 
attention. 

Expenses are as low as at any other school affording equal 
advantages. 

The managers of the school are very careful to make this an 
Institution in which students who are away from home and its 
restraints will he surrounded by good, moral influences, and in this 
they have the co-operation of the citizens of the village. There are 
no beer, liquor or billiard saloons in the villag?. 

No student whose influence is known to have a corrupting 
tendency, will be retained in the school. 

DIPLOMAS. 

Students whose conduct is exemplary, and who complete the 
course of study and prepare and deliver a suitable literary pro- 
duction, will be furnished a diploma, signed by the instructors and 
the President and Secretary of the Board of Trustees. To re- 
ceive a diploma a student should be in attendance at the Academy 
one year, except when special arrangements are made with the 
Superintendent and Hoard of Trustees. 

LECTURES. 

Students have the opportunity to hear good 1 rehires at small 
expense. Addresses on various subjects are given during the year. 

LITERARY EXERCISES. 

Literary exercises may be required of all students in all 
grades, both in class work and before the public. Caie is \ised 
that students may learn the art of composition and public delivery. 
Essays and declamations are a part of the regular school work in 
the department of oratory. 

LIBRARIES. 

Five sets of encyclopedias are in the school rooms, and these, 
with the dictionaries and numerous reference books, are for the 
free use of all There is a large library in connection with' the 
school, which comprises about three thousand volumes. 

The texts adopted by the State Board of Kducation are used 
in the Academy. 

14 



EXPENSES. 

RATES OF TUITION. 

Special classes for each study $1.00 per month 

Academic classes for two or more studies 

Special clases for each study $1.00 per month 

Students who enter at irregular times will be charged full tui- 
tion for tha term in case they complete the term's work in such 
manner as to receive credit toward the diploma. 

Special students and others who do not expect to earn credit 
in the regular course will lie charged only for the time of actual 
enrollment in the classes. 

Occasionally those who are especially strong are permitted 
to earn credits by outside study under the supervision of the 
teachers. For such credits as these one-half the regular tuition 
will be charged. 

Tuition is due at the opening of each term, and settlement 
should, be made with the Superintendent or the Treasurer of the 
Board of Trustees. Students will receive no credit for their work 
until the tuition is paid. 

BOARDING. 

The citizens of Spiceland have always given the students a 
hearty welcome by receiving them into their homes. The cost of 
boarding and rooms in private families where everything is 
furnished can be had for $3.00 to $4.00 a week. ; 

Persons who may live near enough to go home at the end of 
the week, and who wish to economize, may reduce the cost of 
living to a very small sum. 

LIST OF STUDENTS. 

SENIORS. 

Black, Marie Mcllvaine, Albert 

Brown, Harold Modlin, Marie 

Daugherty, Helen Pennington, Agnes 

lOwing, Gbrtez Pickering, Vivian 

llaisley, Pauline Boners, Clyde 

Hardin, Fred Shepherd, Maurine 

Jarrett, Carl Swain, Mary 

Jefferies, Lowell Woodward, Noramn 
Mc Daniel, Irene 



15 



JUNIORS. 



Delon, Frank Pickering, Irene 

Evans, Dorris Pratt, Adrain 

Hall, Waneta Reece, Paul 

Hanna, Marie Spahr, Wayne 

Hill, Louise Stewart, Mildred 

Leigh, Howard Trobaugh, Leslie 

SOPHOMORES 

Antrim, Karl James, Kathrina 

Brewer, Ruby ( Jay, Menia 

Deem. Claude Millikan, Carroll 

Gordon, Royden Pennington, Irene 

Hill, Ezra Peer, Edward 

Hoffman, .Marie Ratlin", Ruth 

FRESHMEN. 

Butler, Mary McFarland, Ralph 

■ Chambers, Nina Pale, Grace 

Copeland, Vernon Pate, Clara 

Kssington, Cash Pike, Myron 

Ewing, llollis Poer, Emma 
Henshaw, Howard 1 Ratliff, Hazel 

Kimbrell, Olen Wilson, Georgia 

LIST OF ACADEMY SUPERINTENDENTS . 

Oliver Bales 1859-180:5 

btarkson Davis 1863-1867 

Edward Taylor 1867-1868 

Clarkson Davis 1868-1874 

Timothy Wilson 1S74-1876 

Clarkson Davis 1 876-1 SS2 

Thomas Newlin 1 882-1 883 

William P. Pinkham 1884-1885 

Thomas Newlin 1885-1892 

J. Prank Brown * . . . .' 1892-1893 

Arthur \V. Jones '..1893-1894 

George W. Neet 1894-1898 

16 



Murray S. Wild man 

M. S. Woods 

Homer H. Cooper . . 

ALUMNI. 



1898-1901 
1901-1903 
1903- 



OFFICERS FOR 1914-1915. 

President Edwin Rateliff 

Vice-President Anna Painter 

Secretary Elma Lawrence 

Treasurer Hazel Cochran 

Orator Louisa Wickersham 

Vice-Orator Belle Chambers Bailey 

Historian Harriet Dickinson 

Vice-Historian Myron Painter 

William Smith 

Executive Committee Mary Antrim Wilson 

Marie Bundy 



Those marked (*) are deceased. 

1870 *Eli U. Cook i 

John J. Stubbs Omaha, Neb 

1871 *Walter D. Jones 

*Alvin H. Jenkins 

*T. Macy Good 

C. R. Dixon Paonia, Col 

R. G. Boone Berkeley, Cal 

Dallas Sisson Spicelaird 

Mary BaTlenger (Barnard) New Castle 

Louisa Wickersham Spiceland 

Lida Edwards (Saint) New Castle 

1872 Lindley H. Johnson Dunreith 

•David Henley 

♦Jacob Hill 

Henry W. Painter New Castle, R F D 1 

Robert fi. Mitchell Pacific Grove, Cal 

1873 *Sadie D. Talbert (Wright) 

Aaron B. Bell Springtown, Ark 

*J. Tilman DuUhins 

John Pennington Damascus, O 



17 



Mary Stubbs (Painter) New Castle, R F D 1 

Nathan Williams Oswego, Kan 

S. Carrie Talbert (Newby) Wichita, Kan 

1874 Alice Coffin (Russell) New York City 

Alvira Spencer (Harold) Indianapolis 

.1. P. Edwards Knightstown 

William S. Moffitf Kennard 

Edwin O. Kennard Pasadena, Cal 

Nathan Roseftberger Muoatine, Iowa 

*\v. E. Jackson 

D. C. Mitchell Spiceland 

1875 VV. VV. Gregg Indianapolis 

William Pidgeon Bloomington 

Irvin Stanley f Westfield 

1877 Milton Roberts Linnville, Iowa 

1878 S. Ella Cogue (Dogget) Danville, Va 

Belle Chambers (Daily) Richmond 

J. Pinkney Mitchell Seattle, Wash. 

Thomas Mitchell Knightstown, R ED 1 

Flora Moore (Brady) Lincoln vilte 

Jbhn O. Reed Ann Arbor, Midi 

*William Seaford 

Fannie Thomburg (Parsons) Oak Park, III 

1879 J. A. Buck Terre Haute 

Carrie Goodwin (Jeffrey) New Castle 

Thomas Newlin Whittier, Cal 

1880 J. Edgar Cloud San Diego, Cal 

Win. N. Lamb San Francisco, Cal 

Maftie Lamb Outland Aniboy 

Ada Grace Murphy Chattanooga, Tenn 

Ida May Roberts Indianapolis 

Emma Belle Roberts Indianapolis 

Frank Symons Portland, Maine 

Lamira Truoblood (Kelluni) Camby 

1881 Oscar R. Baker Winchester 

♦Corrie Bogue 

Minnie Benedict ( Blankenship) Paragon 

Carrie Unthank (Kelluni) Indianapolis 

*Jessie Stratton 

1882 'Arthur H. Baily 

J. Newton Barnard Daleville 

Harriet Bogue (Newlin) Indianapolis 

Hattie E. Dickinson Spiceland 



18 



Charles Newlin Indianapolis 

'J883 Anna Hnddelson (Foster) Washington, 1) C 

Ryland Ratliff Danville 

Julia Stafford (Newby) New Castle, R E D 2 

Emily Weeks Middletown.R I'' 1) 1 

11884 *Cora Kirk 

Ella Stratton (Hodson) New Castle, R E 1) 10 

Virginia Griffin (Cory) Dunreith 

Isadore Hall (Wilson) Spiceland 

William Julian Hastings, Neb 

Charles Newby Converse 

T885 Mary L. Broun (Pennington) Spiceland 

Alfred Y. King Mt. Vernon, 111 

Oliver C. Steele Spiceland 

188G L. Winnie Baily (Clement) Haddonfield, X. J. 

Mattie 10. Brown Daytonia, Ela 

Richard Broadbent Ehvood 

Elbert Griffin Elwood 

Alonzo C. Hodson New Castle, R E I) 10 

*John L. McNew 

Russell Ratliff Marion 

1887 Herbert T. Baily Spiceland 

Clarence H. Beard Indianapolis 

Anna K. Bogue (Shaffer) Benton Harbor, Midi 

Lindley Cornpton Toinah, Wis 

Elizabeth S. Hiatt (Geneau) Omaha, Neb 

Abraham Miller Seymour 

Bert Smith Zionsville 

1888 Rhoda Bailenger (Cunningham) Indianapolis 

♦Hannah Brown (Stribbing) 

Oryntba Brown (Jester) Pavton, Iowa 

*Jessie Butler 

Clara G. Ed wards (Knight) St. Louis, Mo 

John C. Cook New Castle 

Elva Elliott (Cornpton) Tomah, Wis 

Achsah E. Ratdiff (Ratliff) Richmond 

H. H. Rayl Muncie 

Charles Stubbs Frankfort 

J. A. Greenstreet New Castle 

H. H. Ratcliff Connersville 

1889 Laura Benedict Indianapolis 

Blanch Braddock (McNew) Greenfield 

Frank Copeland Dunreith 



19 



Estella Deem (Kennedy) Spiceland 

♦Lawrence Gardner 

Gertrude Gordon (Geneaux) Victoria, Texas 

Sue Griffin (Evans) Spiceland 

Otis Stubbs . Lewisville, R F D 

May White Pasadena, Cal 

1890 L. Etta Butler Lewisville, R F 1) 

Elmer Deem Frankfort 

Edwin 1! Ftatcilff Spiceland 

Bennie Stratton New Castle, R F D 1 

S. E. Stubbs Wilkinson 

1891 Ethel E. Copeland (Lee) Meadeville, Pa 

Louie Edrnundson (Poe) New Castle 

Mauririe Gardner (Kern) . ./ Cadiz 

Charles N Hardy Markleville 

Alice Hiatt (Copeland) Cincinnati, O 

Ernest Sisson Greenfield 

Alfred H Symons Supai, Ariz 

Mary M. Teas (Parker) ICaton, O 

Charles Titus Warrington 

Herbert D. Woodard Chicago, 111 

1892 Jesse S. Baily Silverton, Col 

Clara Brown Spiceland 

Warren T. Evans Canby, Minn 

John is. Greeustreet Lewisville R F D 

Winnie E-Iinshaw Milligan Winchester 

David M. Kemp Kempton 

Alice Lawrence Spiceland 

Estella Symons Minneapolis, Minn 

Alvin Ulrich Greensboro 

1893 Oscar Bogue Spiceland 

Kstella Charles (Fawcett) Indianapolis 

Floy Hill Pasadena, Cal 

Arthur Holloway Oskaloosa, Iowa 

Leora Jessup (I'arker) .' Westland 

John Miller New Castle 

*01en Payne 

Lena Rayie s v.mith) Spiceland 

George Smith Knightstown 

Orville White ? Joplin, Mo 

1894 Minnie Black (Moore) Chicago, 111 

Bessie I. Brown (Stone) Daytona, Fla 

Clarence V. Hall New Castle 



Horace Hardy Markleville 

Ida Holloway (Ken worthy) Richmond 

Ailie Hood Chicago, 111 

Bertha Jessup Clay Center, Neb 

Elma Lawrence ." Spiceland 

Maude M. Shaffer (Byrket) New Castle 

Frank Pitts Indianapolis 

Oscar F. Symons Minneapolis, Minn 

1895 Clarence Painter New Castle 

Mabel Wright (Gaar) Cambridge City 

Edgar Cox Clarkton, N C 

♦Nellie Hatliff 

Howard Henley Tuttle, Okla 

Maud Wildman (Evans) Philadelphia, Pa 

Frank lludelson Mays 

♦Pearl Moffett (Wood) . . 

1896 Cora Hudson (Bogue) Spiceland 

Clara White (Wildman) Sehna, O 

Elsie Hudel son (Holland) Brooklyn 

Anna Mori is (Wilson) South Wabash 

Pearl M. James (Tweedy) Wabash 

Mabel Newby (Hood) Chicago 

W. J. Carson New York 

Nora Griffin (Beach) South Bend 

Theresa Wildman Philadelphia, Pa 

Roscoe Edwards New Castle 

1897 Leoti Applegate (Coffin) Spiceland 

Elva M. Hudson (Hall; Spiceland 

Lois M. Henley , Indianapolis 

*Fannie Hayes 

Floy Hudelson Greenfield 

Josie 15. Barlan (Weatherman) Dana 

Jessie Leaky (Hiatt) New Lisbon 

Pearl Millikan (Hardy) Markleville 

Ethel miner (Newby) Lnglewood, Kan 

Mayme Stafford (Applegate) Spiceland 

Clyde Sisson (Moore) Indianapolis 

Minnie Stratton (Stafford) New Castle R FD 1 

Charles 11. Smith Philadelphia, Pa 

*Irving White 

1898 Clifford Applegate Spiceland 

James lloltselaw Spiceland 

Bavis Nay Danville 



21 



Emory Ratcliff New Castle, R F D 

Gertrude Seaford Spiceland 

Pear] Symons Spiceland 

Lelie Smith (Rice) Spencer, O 

Charles A. Beard New York City 

Mefritt Stafford Carthage 

Cora Smith (Sparks) Summitville 

Walter Painter Crown Point 

Bertha Cnarles (Hewitt) Harlem, Mont 

ErneSt Shockley . Angola 

Elsie Shockley (Lockridge) Shawnee, Okla 

1899 Bessie Huicley Alvin 

Bertha O. Lawrence (McCracken) Holgu, Cuba 

Florence 0. Macy (Parker) '. Cartilage 

Karl Molifelt Knightstown, 11 F I) 2 

Walter T. Pearce Rushville 

Orahell Shaffer (Bell) New Castle, R F D 2 

1900 Ethel Applegate (Painter) Spiceland 

Edgar Bazzle New Castle 

Susan Benedict (Nay) Danville 

Cora Charles (Carson) Crete 

Connie Griffin Knightstown 

David W. Gordon St. Louis 

Guy II. Hall New Lisbon 

Clyde Kennedy Berkley, Cal 

Clarence Macy Scott City, Kan 

Kverctt Macy Scott City, Kan 

Carroll Mills Kirksville, Mo 

Cecil Ncwhy Fnglewood, Kan 

•Jeanette Rifner 

Pernia Thornburg (Griffin) Merino, Col 

.lohn R Thompson New Castle 

1901 Ira E. Bell New Castle, R F D 2 

Bertha 15. Butler (Ballard) Lewisville 

Raymond Byrket Lewisville 

Jennie Coinpton (Cope) Dunreith 

Everett e Cope Dunreith 

Deborah Edwards Knightstown, R F D 

Ethel Edwards (Kramein) Bloomington, 111 

Lillian H. Hayes , Dunreith 

Walter B. Harvey Pittsburg, Pa 

John R. Hinshaw New Castle 



22 



Everest Macy Scott City, Kan 

Georgia Millikan (Hardy) Penaletou 

Jennie E. Millikan (Wright) Edinburg 

Homer Nugeu Lewiswue 

Cora E. Risk (Deenij '.Spiceland 

Robert A. Roberts New Albany 

Grace E Stewart Greemieid 

Russell L. Wright Portland, Oregon 

Walter C. Wilson Pasadena, Cal 

1902 Harley Anderson spiceland 

Jessie Baily bpiceianu 

Mary Butler New Castie, it F L) I 

Walter Byers Knigntstown, R F D 1 

Jennie Kirk (Kerr) Dayton, Ohio 

Guerney Maple Whittier, Cal 

Manning Smith Philadelphia, Pa 

Rena Thomas Fountain City 

Retta Thomas Matamoia, Mex 

Russell Wilson W hittier Cal 

India Yost (Cook) Sulphur Springs 

1903 Rilla Bartlett (Harvey) Pittsburg, Pa 

Nellie Beckett Whittier, Lai 

Perrin Holt luuiariapolis 

Arthur Johnson ., Lewisville 

Carl Newby Mulhail, Okla 

Rupert Redic , El Paso, Tex 

Ralph Stubbs Spiceland 

Walter Wright Kdinburg 

1904 *Klsie Bell (Applegate) 

Josephine Beeson (Niles) Spiceland 

Will Benedict Los Angeles, Cal 

Lawrence Bridges Greenfield 

Warren Edwards .Lewisville 

Irl Evans Mt. Summit 

Jessie Cordon (Newby) Richmond" 

Ruth Harvey Dunreith 

Haze) lleacock (Yockey) Spiceland 

Homer Henley Muskogee, Okla 

Claire Hoover (May) Indianapolis 

Barton Jones Spiceland 

Belva Jordan (Coffin) New Castle, R F D 1 

Guy May Indianapolis 

Pansy Newby Lewisville 



23 



Anna Painter Newcastle, RPD1 

Clara Patterson (Rothrock) New Castle, R F D 1 

Lois Pitts Morristown, R F D 

Wendell Pitts Morristown, R F D 

Lawrence Reeves Knightstown 

Robert Reeves Wilkinson 

Etta Rifner (Parker) Indianapolis 

John Rogers Mooreland 

♦Herbert Seaford ' 

Ralph Silver Knightstown 

Bernetha Smith Muneie 

Charles Veach Mt. Summit 

Ethel Wright (Hershaur) Spiceland 

Harold Yoc&ey , Oklahoma City, Okla 

1905 Elsie Anderson (Conwell) MoorelairJ 

Walter Brandy Richmond 

Raymond Duke Indianapolis 

Alexander Gano Indianapolis 

Oran Griffin Indianapolis 

Ruth Gardner New Castle, R F I) 1 

Elva Kcnnard (Mueller) New Castle 

Aura Lane (I.ee) New Castle 

Edward Pope New Castle, R F D (! 

Jessie Reece Long Beach, Cal 

Ruby Reeves . .' Knightstown 

Anna Reeves Wilkinson, R F D 2 

•Arthur Rifner . 

Arden Stubbs . .i Spiceland 

Everett Test Spiceland 

Amy Thomas (Sherry) Grceni'iel'd 

Paul Wilson Spiceland 

1906 Charles Bundy Spiceland 

Walter Bundy Spiceland 

Arthur lludelson New Castle, R If D 

Hazel lludelson Dunreith 

* Ed n a Kellar 

Prances Nugon (Tagerstown 

Myron Pointer Spiceland 

Edgar Rogers Moorelaml 

Otis Shaffer .'Richmond 

Maud Simmons (Bolin) Zanesville, O 

Grover VanDine Shirley 

Orville Wright New Castle, R F D 



24 



1907 Hazel Bartlett Lewisville 

Irene Bell (Wright) Greensboro 

Bertha Bowers (Rogers) Moorelaml 

Ruby McDaniel (Rutherford) Carthage 

Levinus Painter Hartford, Conn 

Howard Seaford • Spiceland 

Clenna Smith (Moffitt) Lewisville 

Hassel Williams Muneie 

1908 Herschel Alf Lewisville 

Clara Burcham (Hinshaw) New Castle 

Lthel Chandler Spiceland 

Loma Helen • Spiceland 

Margaret Harden Knightstown, U F D 

Ruby .Julian I Recce) Washington, D C 

ICvere't Kcnnard Knightstown, R F I) 

Glenn Kli'khain Riishville, It F U 9 

Raul McDaniel Knightstown, R F D :! 

Vida Redic Cloudcroft, New Mexico 

Hazel Reese (Clampe.it) Greensboro 

Bessie Sid well St. Clairsville, O 

Mary Seaford (All) Lewisville 

lidna Swindell Greensboro 

Lucile Wilson Pasadena, Cal 

1909 Beula Arnold New Castle, R F D 6 

Loren Butler Spiceland 

Marie Clarke (Little) Springfield 

Walter Hays Markleville 

Ruth lludelson (Cold) New Castle, R F D 10 

ISthel Jackson (Clayton) Straughn 

Ada Janet t (Hinshaw) Kennard 

Lucile Mcllvaine Lewisville 

James McGrady New Castle 

Griffin Moffitt Knightstown, R F D 

Alma Osborn Winchester, R F D 

iJgar Bennington Spiceland 

Hoyt Reese Whittier, Cal 

Hazel Skaafes (tin nee) Newman 

Minnie Simmons (Staley) Wilkinson 

"■Margaret Smith 

Clayton Teeter Mooreland 

Ross Williams Chicago, 111 

Perry Wilson Spiceland 

1910 Mary Antrim (Wilson) Spiceland 



25 



Helen Bartlett (Pottenger) Indianapolis 

Clarence Cartwright ■ Lewis ville 

Nettie Grissom New Castle 

Marie Hendricks Straughn 

Bernice Henshaw Dunreith 

Mary Jessup Modoc 

Minnie Kiser (Boyd) New Castle 

Andrew Markle Middletown 

Ruth May Straughn 

Ruth Moft'ett Knightstown, R F D 

Clarence Rich Mays, R F D 25 

Haze] Seaford (Winan) Eaton, Ohio 

Lena Shively (Test) New Castle, R F D 

William Smith '. Spiceland 

Edith Stigleman (Moffitt) Knightstown, R F D 

Leanna Taylor <M<New) Knightstown 

Ralph Test New Caslle, It F I) 1 

Kerney Wilson Spiceland 

1911 Roy Brown Greenfield 

Howard Caldwell Indianapolis 

Hazel Cochran Spiceland 

Ruba Cochran (Symons) Lewisville 

Ralph Evans Spiceland 

Decil Fields Spicelan'd 

Ruth Harvey Spiceland 

Howard Harvey New Castle 

Clarence Hoffman Spiceland 

Myra Hunnicutt (Beard) Economy 

Margaret Hunnicutt (Stuart) Hagerstown 

Grace Myers New Castle, R E D 

Myra. Painter Richmond 

Everett Pennington Spiceland 

Erma Pierson (Smullen) Lewisville 

Rex Potterf Lewisville 

Merwin Symons Lewisville 

Ernestine Williams (Millikan) New Castle 

1912 Sadie Bacon Ml. Summit 

Dorothy Bell Spiceland 

Ralph Chandler Spiceland 

Edith Chew Knightstown 

Ruth Conner " Lewisville 

Gertrude DeWltte Strailghn 



20 



Russell Ewing Knightstown 

Paul Fletcher Lewisville 

Alvin Hardin Knightstown 

Martha Hays Markleville 

Melissa Lane Spiceland 

Mabel Macy • ••• Straughn 

Exie Moft'ett Knightstown 

Clara Montgomery Dunreith 

Norma Pierson Lewisville 

Rachel Test Spicelanl 

Margaret Toohey Spiceland 

Audrey West Markleville 

1913 Mabel Buck (Symons) Spiceland 

Addie Butler New Castle, R F I) 

Marie Bundy Spiceland 

Olive UeWitte Straughn 

Jessie Draper Spiceland 

Anna Evans Spiceland 

Iris Hall Hagerstown 

Georgia Hodson Knightstown 

Floss Kiser Dunreith 

Mildred Mercer Indianapolis 

Hazel Moffitt Knightstown 

Leonora Pickett Dunreith 

Lydia Sellers Spiceland 

Raymond Stubbs Cambridge City 

Zola Waddell Dunreith 

Ercel Wilson Spiceland 



27 



courier jon print, nhwcasti.k, ind. 1 

1 



FACULTY AND CALENDAR 



For the Academic Year 1915-1916 



INSTRUCTORS 



HOMER H. COOPER, A. M., Superintendent 
History- 
Anna Painter, A. B. 
English and Vocal Music 

Robert Fisher, B. S. 
Mathematics and Science 

Clara Kendall, A. B. 
Language and Science 

Mrs. Adella H. Ratcliff 
Pianoforte 

CALENDAR 



1915 

Fall Term begins Tuesday, September 7 
Fall Term ends Friday, December 24 

1916 

Winter Term begins Monday, January 3 
Winter Term ends Friday, March 17 
Spring Term begins Monday, March 27 
Commencement, Friday, May 26 



BOARD OF TRUSTEES 



Edwin B. Ratcliff. President 

George Evans, Secretary and Treasurer 

John S. Griffin 

Seth C. Symons 

Charles B. Harvey 

James Holtsclaw 



INSTRUCTORS 

Academic Year 1914-1915 

HOMER H. COOPER, A. M., Superintendent 
History 

Anna Painter, A. B. 
English and Music 

Barclay Morris, B. S. 
Mathematics and Science 



Clara Kendall. A. B. 
Latin and German 



Spiceland Academy 



HISTORY 

SPICELAND ACADEMY is the oldest academy in charge of the 
Friends in Indiana. It was chartered as an academy in 1870, 
but its history as a Friends' school extends over a period of 
eighty years. It is under the control of the Spiceland Monthly 
Meeting, by which the Board of Trustees is appointed. The teachers 
are selected by the Trustees. While the school is under denomina- 
tional control, it is not sectarian in the least ; its foundation rests up- 
on Christian culture ; it has been kept under strong Christian influ- 
ences, and its purpose is to develop practical, earnest, and active 
Christian, manhood and womanhood. 

The first class graduated in 1870. The Alumni Association now 
enrolls four hundred sixty. About three thousand five hundred stu- 
dents have received instruction in the school since its organization as 
an academy. The Course of Study and the Methods of Teaching are 
kept conservative in character and thoroughly progressive in spirit. 

LOCATION 

Spiceland Academy is located in the beautiful town of Spiceland, 
Indiana, in the southern part of Henry county, on the Lake Erie & 
Western railroad, two miles north of Dunreith, on the Pennsylvania 
railroad. The buildings are situated in the midst of a beautiful grove, 



adjoining which is a large campus, well adapted to athletic sports. 
The interurban street car line gives connections with surrounding cities. 

Spiceland Academy has a new and thoroughly modern building- 
well heated, well lighted, and well ventilated. Besides the gymnasium 
it has ten commodious rooms, all devoted to high school purposes. The 
rooms for Sciences, Manual Training, and Domestic Science are es- 
pecially suited for their purposes. The sanitary water supply system 
is used. The library has been brought up to date, and is one of the 
finest reference libraries in similar secondary schools. In the new 
building there is an abundance of room for the regular recitations and 
for prevocational work. Excellent equipment has been furnished for 
the proper teaching of all subjects for secondary schools. The build- 
ing has been arranged and every facility given for keeping Spiceland 
Academy in the very highest rank of schools. 

ENTRANCE 

Students may enter at any time, but students coming from other 
schools are required to bring certificates stating their literary and 
moral standing. In the absence of approved certificate, examinations 
will be held and students classified accordingly. 

The conditions for admission to the First Year class are the same 
as for entrance to tin; public high schools of this state. 

In general, a graduate from non-commissioned high schools of this 
county can enter the Academy with credit for the number of months' 
work he has studied in his home school wherein the work is up to the 
standard of the commissioned high school. 

THE COURSE OF STUDY 

The Academy Course of Study conforms to the requirements of 
the State Hoard of Education. In addition many elective subjects are 
offered, and thus a student may prepare fur any college, or more thor- 
oughly equip himself for his life's work. The Course of Study has 
been arranged with two purposes in view: - 

First — It is prepared to conform to the needs and desires of all 
students who may not have the opportunity to pursue a college course, 
but who desire a practical education which will prepare them to lead 
an active and a successful life. 

Second— It is arranged to enable students to make the necessary 
preparation for admission into college without examination. 



8 



THE ENGLISH COURSE 

The completion of the English Course will entitle one to a certifi- 
cate of credit. It is intended for those who have no expectation of at- 
tending college, but who wish to be prepared as well as possible for 
their work in life. 

It is to be understood that the College Preparatory Course is the 
one required for college entrance requirements. 

BIBLE STUDY 

The study of the Bible is considered of so much importance that 
arrangements have been made by which it will be taught in the Acad- 
emy. The subject will be made an elective one. Credit will be given 
as in other studies. This will be one of the most valuable studies in 
the course, and it is hoped many will take advantage of the work. 

STATE CERTIFICATE OF EQUIVALENCY 



The State Board of Education has given the Academy a Certificate 
of Equivalency. This enables the graduates to enter any college in 
the State without an examination. 





FIRST YEAR 


SECOND YEAR 


JUNIOR 


SENIOR 


Required 


English 
Algebra 


ICnVisii 
Geometry 
Ancient Hist. 


English 


Kngllsh 
A ineriean II Istory 
and ( ivies 


Elective 


Latin 
German 
Botany 
Domestic 
Science 
Manual 
Training 
Physical 
Geography 

(Any two) 


Latin 
German 

Domestic 
Science 
Man-will 

Training 

Of 

Any of llrst yr. 
not, taken 

(Any one! 


Latin 
German 
Algebra M year 
Solid Geometry 

14 year 
Manual Training 
Domestic Science 
Mo. Ic in History 
A ny of 11 rut or 
second year.s not 
ta Icon 
(.An j three) 1 


Latin 
German 
Physics 
Arithmetic yf ar 
Bible \:, year 
ICngll.qh History 
Nature study, or any 
subject not taken In 
1st, 'Jnd or ;ird years. 

(Any two) 



In addition to those mentioned above, the following electives may 
be taken: Advanced English, Vocal or Instrumental Music, Drawing, 
Agriculture, Bookkeeping, Trigonometry, Chemistry, Astronomy,' 
Business Law, Political Economy, Typewriting, Mechanical Drawing, 
or any special elective. 



MANUAL TRAINING, AGRICULTURE, BOOKKEEPING 

The Board of Trustees is making special preparation for the teach- 



ing of the practical subjects demanded by the spirit of the times. 
Special courses in Manual Training, Domestic Science, Agriculture, 
and Bookkeeping are offered. Those of our young people who do not 
expect to attend college may now have the opportunity in the Acade- 
my of securing an education in those subjects especially desired by 
them. 

Students who wish to do post-graduate work will have an excel- 
lent opportunity to study in elective subjects. 

Advanced classes in any of the lines of study will be formed when- 
ever a sufficient number of pupils desire the higher work. The diplo- 
ma of the Academy will admit the student to any of the colleges in 
Indiana or of other Status without entrance examinations. 

Higher classes in any subject or classes in subjects not offered 
will be formed whenever there is sufficient demand, and tuition will be 
charged, one dollar per month for each study. Satisfactory work in 
these studies may be substituted for work in regular course at the 
discretion of the Superintendent. 

The course of study makes provision for a number of electives, 
thus giving the student an opportunity to select work along the line 
of his preference. 

It is especially urged that all pupils take the regular College I re- 
para to ry Course of study, and after graduation attend college, if pos- 
sible. 

Increased advantages are offered in the arrangements made to 
take elective work in the following departments: Drawing, Music, 
and Pievocational work. 

ENGLISH 

I. English Composition. 

The aim of this course is to give the student a practical knowl- 
edge in the principles of English composition. Every student should 
be able to use correctly his own language, both in writing and in 
speaking. Two recitations per week are given in this study during 
each year of the Academic course. The student is required to write 
at least one short theme each week. The theme is then discussed by 
the class and carefully criticised by the teacher. 

1st year— Composition and Grammar. 

2nd year— Composition and Rhetoric. 

3rd year-Composition and Rhetoric. 

4th year— Term Essays and Rhetoric. 



10 



II. English Literature. 

The purpose of this course is to create an interest in literature for 
its own sake and to increase the culture of the student by developing 
a love for the best in thought and style. This can be done only by a 
thorough study of the masterpieces of the most important English and 
American writers. It is desired to emphasize that the reading of the 
following selections does not constitute the proper study of literature. 
The time element is important. To receive credit for a year's work 
requires nine months' time under the careful supervision of an exper- 
ienced teacher. 

First Year. I, Longfellow's Poems; Stevenson's Treasure Is- 
land; Dickon's Christmas Carol and The Cricket on the Hearth; one 
book in outside reading; II, Whittier's Poems; Shakespeare's Mer- 
chant of Venice; Irving's Sketch Book; one book in outside reading. 

Second Year. I, Scott's Ivanhoe; Lady of the Lake; Eliot's Silas 
Marner; one book in outside reading. II, Sir Roger de Coverley Pa- 
pers; Macaulay's Lays of Ancient Rome; Shakespeare's Julius Caesar; 
Lamb's Old China and Other Essays; Selected Poems of Coleridge 
and Campbell; one book in outside reading. 

Third Year. 1, Lowell's Poems; Washington's Farewell Address 
and Webster's Bunker Hill Oration; Hawthorne's Twicetold Tales; 
Poe's Tales; one book in outside reading. II, Lincoln's Cooper Union 
Address; Macaulay's Speeches on Copyright; Shakespeare's As You 
Like It; First View of American Literature by Moody, Lovett and 
Boynton; one book in outside reading. 

Fourth Year. I, A First View of English Literature by Moody, 
Lovett and Boynton; Shakespeare's Hamlet and Twelfth Night; Mil- 
ton's Short Poems; one book in outside reading. II, Burke's Concilia- 
tion; Selections from The Golden Treasuray of Palgrave; Tennyson's 
Poem's; Shakespeare's Macbeth; one book in outside reading. 

HISTORY 

The course in History is now arranged to conform to the recom- 
mendations of the Committee of Seven of the American Historical As- 
sociation. 

Besides the culture value of history, it is to be remembered that 
it is the study which furnishes the students the ideals of character 
which lead to the highest moral growth. The student should thor- 
oughly understand the institutional life of the people studied. 



11 



The purposes of history in the Academy are as follows: 

First. The development of moral character. History as the study 
of institutional life and of character teaches us to watch the progress 
of humanity in the rise and fall of nations. Success or failure in nat- 
ional life or in the life of a person will cause us to adopt for ourselves 
and our country that which has proven of excellent worth. History 
helps us to avoid the mistakes of other people and nations. 

Second. The teaching of patriotism and the broadening of our in- 
terests and sympathies. While we wish to be familiar with our own 
government and national character, we must recognize the broad prin- 
ciple of the universal brotherhood of men. 

Third. The development of our powers of judgment. It is here 
that we especially study the relation between cause and effect. Every 
statesman has been a student of history. In studying the problems 
of life which have confronted other people we are greatly aided in the 
practical solution of the life problems of today. 

Fourth. The acquirement of useful facts. This, though general- 
ly considered of most, importance, is in fact hut a subordinate purpose 
in the study of history. 

Fifth. The gaining of a broad and practical general culture. The 
work consists of a study of Ancient History in the second year; a spe- 
cial study of Medieval and Modern History in the third year; of Eng- 
lish History in the third year; United States History and Civil Gov- 
ernment in the fourth year. 

MATHEMATICS . 

The aid of this study is to introduce the student to mathematical 
methods and develop in him the power to reason clearly and accurately 
on any given problem. Algebra is studied throughout the first year of 
the high school and the first half of the third year; Geometry during 
the second year and through the last half of the third year. A great 
deal of supplementary work is given in Algebra, and original exercises 
are introduced as much us possible in Geometry. Arithmetic is an 
elective study. 

LATIN 

There is no subject in the Academy which has greater disciplinary 
value to the pupil than the study of Latin. It trains and strengthens 
the memory, cultivates and quickens the perception, and develops hab- 
its of ready, accurate and sound thinking. 

12 



A very large per cent, of all the words used in the dictionary will 
be of Latin origin, therefore some knowledge of this subject is abso- 
lutely necessary for a correct understanding of our own English lan- 
guage. It gives us a key to a quicker understanding of all that we 
read or hear. It is essential to all who are to continue work in college. 
It is helpful to every professional man. It will give us a greater ap- 
preciation of the Latin writers and speakers. It increases our general 
eultm - e and contributes to our broader discipline. 

The College Preparatory Course is required of all who expect to 
attend college. In general cases, to fit the student for college, equiv- 
alent subjects may be substituted. 

SCIENCE 

Prevoc;ition;iI Studies 

In Domestic Science one year's work will be given. This will con- 
sist of the following: 

I. A study of foods and their preparation. 

II. Sewing. 

HI. House Furnishing. 

IV. Laundry Work. 

V. Hygiene— study of the care of a the body— of diseases, etc. 

In Manual Training, there will be a study of the elements of me- 
chanical drawing and wood finishing. There will be the practical con- 
struction of various useful articles. 

The principles of Agriculture will consist of the study of Soils and 
fertility of farm and garden crops, of horticulture, dairying and hus- 
bandry. 

In all prevocational work the student will have the very best op- 
portunity of learning the practical side of the work. Each of these 
studies will be given five days in the week throughout the year. 

The Academy is supplied with sufficient apparatus to be a valuable 
aid in the study of natural sciences. In Physics the subject is illustra- 
ted by man}' simple pieces of apparatus, besides the air pump, electri- 
cal machine, batteries, etc. Geology and Mineralogy are illustrated 
by a collection of more than twelve hundred specimens, presented to 
the Academy by the Alumni. In Zoology and Botany, animals and 
plants are studied from nature, and systems of classification are made 
prominent. In all the sciences objects are used as much as possible. 

The following are the purposes of science work: 



13 



First. To interest the pupil in the observation of nature. 

Second. To develop the power of reasoning through the original 
investigation of the truths of nature. 

Third. To give a practical knowledge of the elementary principles 
of those sciences which are now, in a great measure, causing our rapid 
progress in the civilization of the world. 

COURSE IN MUSIC 

Both vocal and instrumental music will be taught by experienced 
teachers, and credit will be given for the completion of the required 
work. ; 

In instrumental music the student may need to take a preparatory 
course before beginning the work for which the Academy will give 
credit. 

The work required of students in the first year of college work, or 
its equivalent, will furnish the standard for the work in the Academy. 
Each candidate for credit should complete sufficient work to enable 
him to appear in public recitals. 

In the Piano Course the fundamental purpose will be to supply 
complete training in the literature of pianoforte music as represented 
by the degree of advancement attained in each grade, and so to instill 
a love for the best in music, that the amateur as well as the more se- 
rious student, will find the work comprehensive. 

The work will be based upon: 

1. Mason's System of Fundamental Technics. 

2. A knowledge of Scale Formation and chord construction. 

3. Studies from such noted teachers and composers as Heller, 
Czerny, Bertini, for gaining fluency and assurance in playing and 
sight-reading. 

4. Sonatas and compositions from modern and classic composers. 
And - 

5. The training of musical memory, and the preparation of com- 
positions for recital use. 

Tuition charges to students taking piano music will be extra, but 
much less than tuition for the same work elsewhere. 

Private lessons, of one hour, or two of thirty minutes each, per 
week, will he given, as needed, for. which the tuition will be $10.00, in 
advance per semester. This price includes the study of theory and 



14 



history of music, which studies will be required of students of the 
piano. 

In vocal music the work will consist of the following : 

1. The development of the voice through the training of the ear 
to the appreciation of perfect tones. 

2. The studies in the oratorios and songs from the masters of 
music. 

3. A study of the history and development of music having in 
view both the acquaintance and appreciation of music. 

4. A study of the nature and tendency of modern music as se- 
lected from the best of modern composers. 

5. Special chorus singing leading to some public performances. 

GENERAL ITEMS 

The government of Lhe school is based upon the idea that manhood 
is more than scholarship; that self-respect and self-control on the 
part of a student are important factors in the formation of character. 
Greater stress is laid upon the thoroughness of instruction and accu- 
racy of knowledge than upon rapidity of advancement. 

For many years the health of students has been uniformly good. 
There is probably no better location in the State in this respect. 

The Friends and Methodists both hold religious services on the 
Sabbath and each maintains a Sabbath school. Meetings of the 
Young People's Society of Christian Endeavor and the Epworth 
League are held every Sabbath evening, and students are welcome to 
their meetings and membership. 

A sufficient number of teachers is constantly employed so that 
large classes may be avoided, and students may receive personal at- 
tention. 

Expenses are as low as at any other school affording equal ad- 
vantages. 

The managers of the school are very careful to make this an in- 
stitution in which students who are away from home and its restraints 
will be surrounded by good, moral influences, and in this they have 
the co-operation of the citizens of the village. There are no beer, 
liquor or billiard saloons in the village. 

No student whose influence is known to have a corrupting tenden- 
cy, will be retained in the school. 



15 



DIPLOMAS 

Students whose conduct is exemplary, and who complete the 
course of study and prepare and deliver a suitable literary production, 
will be furnished a diploma, signed by the instructors and the Presi- 
dent and Secretary of the Board of Trustees. To receive a diploma a 
student should be in attendance at the Academy one year, except 
when special arrangements are made with the Superintendent and 
Board of Trustees. 

LECTURES 

Students have the opportunity to hear good lectures at small ex- 
pense. Addresses on various subjects are given during the year. 

LITERARY EXERCISES 

Literary exercises may be required of all students in all grades, 
both in class work and before the public. Care is used that students 
may learn the art of composition and public delivery. Essays and 
declamations are a part of the regular school work in the department 
of oratory. 

LIBRARIES 

Five sets of encyclopedias are in the school rooms, and these, 
with the dictionaries' and numerous reference books, are for the free 
use of all. There is a large library in connection with the school, 
which comprises about three thousand volumes. 

The texts adopted by the State Board of Education are used in 
the Academy. 

EXPENSES 
RATES OF TUITION 

Special classes for each study $1.00 per month 

Academic classes for two or more studies 

Special classes for each study. $1.00 per month 

Students who enter at irregular times will be charged full tuition 
for the term in case they complete the term's work in such manner as 
to receive credit toward the diploma, 

Special students and others who do not expect to earn credit in 
the regular course will be charged only for the time of actual enroll- 
ment in the classes. 

Occasionally those who are especially strong are permitted to earn 



16 



credits by outside study under the supervision of the teachers. For 
such credits as these one-half the regular tuition will be charged. 

Tuition is due at the opening of each term, and settlement should 
be made with the Superintendent or the Treasurer of the Board of 
Trustees. Students will receive no credit for their work until the 
tuition is paid. 

BOARDING 

The citizens of Spiceland have always given the students a hearty 
welcome by receiving them into their homes. The cost of boarding 
and rooms in private families where everything is furnished can be 
had for $3.00 to $4.00 a week. 

Persons who may live near enough to go home at the end of the 
week, and who wish to economize, may reduce the cost of living to a 
very small sum. 

LIST OF STUDENTS 
SENIORS 



Delon, Frank 
Evans, Dorris 
Hall, Waneta 
Hill, Louise 
Pickering, Irene 

Antrim, Earl 
Brenneman, Venton 
Brewer, Ruby 
Deem, Claude 
Gorden, Royden 
Hill, Ezra 
Holloway, Ruth 
Holloway, Hazel 
Hoffman, Marie 

Butler, Mary 
Chambers, Nina 
Copeland, Vernon 
Essington, ('ash 
Ewing, Hollis 
Cannaway, Caroline 
Grill'm, Ituth 
Minshaw, Howard 
Kimbrell, Olen 



JUNIORS 



SOPHOMORES 



Pratt, Adrian 
Reece, Paul 
Stewart, Mildred 
Trobaugh, Leslie 



Jay, Menia 
James, Kathrina 
Mercer, Clyde 
Pennington, Irene 
Poer, Edward 
Ratlifr, Ruth 
Templeton, Arnold 
Thomas, Mark 
True, Nellie 

McFarland, Ralph 
Pate, Grace 
Pate, Clara 
Pike, Myron 
Poarch, Damon 
Poer, Emma 
Swindell, John 
Ratliff, Hazel 
Wilson, Georgia 



17 



FRESHMEN 



Addison, Edna 
Brennaman, Veda 
Chambers, Guy 
Chandler, Gertrude 
Copeland, Raymond 
Edwards, Marble 
Grau, Robert 
Gray, Worth 
Griffin, Price 
Harrold, Glenna 
Henshaw, Clinton 
Hinshaw, Robert 

LIST OF ACADEMY 



Oliver Bales 1859-1S63 

Clarkson Davis 1863-1867 

Edward Taylor... -1867-1868 

Clarkson Davis 1868-1874 

Timothy Wilson 1874-1876 

Clarkson Davis 1876-1882 

Thomas Newlin 1882-1883 



Homer II. Coope 



Hoff, Harold 
Hudelson, Marie 
Jackson, Opal 
Kelsy, Robert 
Kirk, Park 
McNew, Arland 
McGrady, George 
Painter, Edna 
Pennington, Leslie 
Pickering, Pauline 
Pierson, Ruth 

SUPERINTENDENTS 

William P. Pinkham... .1884-1885 

Thomas Newlin. 1885-1892 

J. Frank Brown 1892-1893 

Arthur W. Jones 1893-1894 

George W. Neet 1894-1898 

Murray S. Wildman.— 1898-1901 

M. S. Woods 1901-1903 

1903- 



18 



ALUMNI 



OFFICERS FOR 1915-1916 

President Alvin Hardin 

Vice-President . Pearl Rifner 

Secretary Decil Fields 

Treasurer Ruth Gardner 

Orator _ Ralph Test 

Vice-Orator Levinus Painter 

Historian Isadore Wilson 

Vice-Historian ... Everett Pennington 

1. Melissa Lane 

Executive Committee - - ■( 2. Arthur Holloway 

3. Mildred Stewart 



Those marked (*) are deceased. 

1870 *Eli U.Cook 

Jo^.n J. Stubbs Omaha, Neb 

1871 * Walter D. Jones ... 

*Alvin H. Jenkins 

*I. Macy Good 

C. R. Dixon Paonia, Col 

R G. Boone Berkeley, Cal 

Dallas Sisson 1 - Spiceland 

Mary Uallenger (Barnard) New Castle 

Louisa Wickersham Spiceland 

Lida Edwards (Saint) New Castle 

1872 Lindley H. Johnson Dunreith 

*David Henley 

•Jacob Hill 

Henry W. Painter New Castle, R F D I 

Robert G. Mitchell Pacific Grove, Cal 

1873 *Sadie D. Talbert (Wright) _ 

Aaron B Bell Springtown, Ark 

*J. Tilman Hutchins 

John Pennington * Damascus, 



19 



Mary Stubbs (Painter) New Castle, R F D i 

Nathan Williams Oswego, Kan 

S. Carrie Talbert (Newby) Wichita, Kan 

1874 Alice Coffin (Russell) .New York City 

Alvira Spencer (Harold) Indianapolis 

J. P. Edwards Knightstown 

William S. Moffett Kennard 

Edwin O. Kennard Pasadena, Cal 

Nathan Rosenberger... Muscatine, Iowa 

*W. E. Jackson 

D. C. Mitchell.... Spiceland 

1875 W. W. Gregg.. ..L Indianapolis 

William Pidgeon Bloomington 

Irvin Stanley ....Westfield 

1877 Milton Roberts Linnville, Iowa 

1878 S.Ella Bogue (Dogget) Danville, Va 

Belle Chambers (Baily) Richmond 

J. Hinkney Mitchell ..Seattle, Wash 

Thomas Mitchell Olin N. C 

Flora Moore (Brady) Lincolnville 

John O, Reed Ann Arbor, Mich 1 

•William Seaford 

Fannie Thornburg ( Parsons) Oak Park, 111 

187Q J. A. Buck Terre Haute 

Carrie Goodwin (Jeffrey) New Castle 

Thomas Newlin Whittier, Cal 

1880 J. Edgar Cloud Sari Diego, Cal 

Wm. N. Lamb San Francisco, Cal 

Mattie Lamb Outland . . Amboy 

Ada Grace Murphy Chattanooga, Tenn 

Ida May Roberts Bolder, Col 

Emma Belle Roberts Bolder, Co! 

Frank Symons Portland, Maine 

Lamira Trueblood (Kellum) Camby 

1881 Oscar R. Baker Winchester 

*CorrIe Bogue 

Minnie Benedict ( Blankenship) Paragon 

Carrie Unthank-( Kellum) Indianapolis 

*Jessie Stratton 



20 



1882 *Arthur H. Baily 

J. Newton Barnard Daleville 

Harriet Bogue (Newlin) Indianapolis 

Harriet E. Dickinson ... Spiceland 

Charles Newlin Indianapolis 

1883 Anna Huddelson (Foster) Washington, D C 

Ryland Ratliff Danville 

Julia Stafford (Newby) New Castle, R F D 2 

Emily Weeks Middietown, RFD I 

1884 *Cora Kirk 

Ella Stratton (Hodson) New Castle, R F D 10 

Virginia Griffin (Cory) Dunreith 

Isadore Hall (Wilson) Spiceland 

William Julian .Hastings, Neb 

Charles Newby Converse 

1885 Mary L. Brown (Pennington) Spiceland 

Alfred Y. King Mt. Vernon, III 

Oliver C. Steele Spiceland 

1886 L. Winnie Baily (Clement) H addon field, N.J 

Mattie E. Brown ..Daytonia, Fla 

Richard Broadbent Elwood 

Elbert Griffin . .Elwood 

Alonzo C. Hodson New Castle, R F D 10 

"John L. McNew 

Russell Ratliff Marion 

1887 Herbert T. Baily Spiceland 

Clarence H. Beard . Houston, Texas 

Anna K. Bogue (Shaffer) Benton Harbor, Mich 

Lindley Compton Tomah, Wis 

Elizabeth S. Hiatt (Geneau) - Omaha, Neb 

Abraham L. Miller Birmingham, Ala 

Bert Smith .. Zipnsville 

1888 Rhoda Ballenger (Cunningham) Indianapolis 

*Hannah Brown (Stubbing). 

Orynthia Brown (Jester) ..Payton, Iowa 

"•Jessie Butler 

Clara G. Edwards (Knight).. St. Louis, Mo 

John C. Cook New Castle 

Elva Elliott (Compton) Tomah, Wis 



21 



Achsah E. RatcliB (Ratliff) Richmond 

Harmon H. Rayle Muncie 

Charles Stubbs Frankfort 

T. A. Greenstreet ...New Castle 

H. H. Ratcliff Connersville 

Laura Benedict.. Indianapolis 

Blanch Braddock (McNew) Greenfield 

Frank Copeland ..Dunreith 

Estella Deem (K ennedy) Greensburg 

*Lawrence Gardner 

Gertude (Gordon (Geneaux) Victoria, Texas 

Sue Griffin (Evans) Spiceland 

Otis Stubbs Lewisville, R F D 

May White Pasadena, Cal 

L. Etta Butler Lewisville, R F D 

Elmer Deem Frankfort 

Edwin B. Ratcliff. Spiceland 

Bennie Stratton New Castle, R F D I 

S. E. Stubbs Wilkinson 

Ethel E, Copeland (Lee) Meadeville, Pa 

Louie Edmundson (Poe) New Castle 

Maurine Gardner (Kern) Cadiz 

Charles N. Hardy Markleville 

Alice Hiatt (Copeland) Cincinnati, O 

Ernest Sisson Greenfield 

Alfred H. Symons. Supai, Ariz 

Mary M. Teas (Parker) Eaton, O 

Charles Titus Warrington 

Herbert 1). Woodard Chicago, III 

*Jcsse S. Hairy. 

Clara Biown Spiceland 

Warren T. I". vans Canby, Minn 

John 15. Greenstreet Lewisville, R F D 

Winnie Hinshaw Milligan Winchester 

David M.Kemp Kempton 

Alice Lawrence Spiceland 

Estella Symons Minneapolis, Minn 

Alvin TJ 1 rich Greensboro 

Oscar Bogue Spiceland 

Estella Charles (Fawcett) Indianapolis 



22 



Floy Hill Pasadena, Cal 

Arthur Holloway Spiceland 

Leora Jessup (Parker) Westland 

John Miller .....New Castle 

*01en Payne 

Lena Rayle (Smith) Spiceland 

George H. Smith New Castle 

Orville White Joplin, Mo 

Minnie Black (Moore) Chicago, III 

Bessie I. Brown (Stone). Daytonia, Fla 

Clarence V. Hall New Castle 

Horace Hardy Markleville 

Ida Holloway (Kenworthy) Richmond 

Arlie Hood Chicago, 111 

Bertha Jessup. Clay Center, Neb 

Elma Lawrence Spiceland 

Maude M. Shaffer (Byrket) New Castle 

Frank Pitts Indianapolis 

Oscar F. Symons Minneapolis, Minn 

Clarence Painter New Castle 

Mabel Wright (Gaar) Cambridge City 

Edgar Cox ...Clarkton, N. C 

*Nellie Ratliff 

Howard Henley Turtle, Okla 

Maud Wildman (Evans) Philadelphia, Pa 

Frank Hudelson M»ys 

*Pearl Moffett (Wood) 

Cora Hudson (Bogue) Spiceland 

Clara White (Wildman) Selma, O 

Elsie Hudelson (Holland) ... Brooklyn, N. Y 

Anna Morris (Wilson) South Wabash 

Pearl M. James (Tweedy) Wabash 

Mabel Newby (Hood) Chicago 

W J.Carson Minneapolis, Minn 

Nora Griffin (Beach) South Bend 

Theresa Wildman Philadelphia, Pa 

Roscoe Edwards.... - .—New Castle 

Leoti Applegate (Coffin) Spiceland 

Elva M. Hudson (Hall).— Spiceland 

Lois M. Henley Indianapolis 



23 



*Fannie Hayes 

. Floy Hudelson Greenfield 

Josie B. Harland (Weatherman) Dana 

Jessie Leakey (Hiatt) New Lisbon 

Pearl Millikan (Hardy) Markleville 

Ethel Rifner (Newby) Englewood, Kan 

Mayme Stafford (Applegate) Spiceland 

Clyde Sisson (Moore) Indianapolis 

Minnie Stratton (Stafford) New Castle, RFDi 

Charles H. Smith .Philadelphia, Pa 

*Irving White 

189?. Clifford Applegate... Spiceland 

James Holtsclaw ..[ Spiceland 

*I3avis Nay. 

Emory Ratcliff New Castle, R F D 

Gertrude Seaford Spiceland 

Pearl Symons (Rifner) Spiceland 

Lelia Smith ( Rice) ... Spencer, O 

Charles A. Beard New York City 

Merritt Stafford _ Carthage 

Cora Smith (Sparks) Summitville 

Walter Painter Crown Point 

Bertha Charles (Hewitt) Harlem, Mont 

Ernest Shockley Angola 

Elsie Shockley (Lockridge) Shawnee, Okla 

1890 Bessie [-J.aisley.__ Alvin, Texas 

Bertha (). Lawrence (McCracken) Holgan, Cuba 

Florence O. Macy (Parker) Carthage 

Earl Moffett Knightstown, R F D 2 

Walter T. Pearce Rushville 

Orabell Shaffer (Bell) New Castle, R F D 2 

1900 Ethel Applegate (Painter) Spiceland 

Edgar Bazzle New Castle 

Susan Benedict (Nay).... Mt. Summit 

Cora Charles (Carson) Crete 

Connie Griffin . . Knightstown 

David W. Gordon . St. Louis 

Quy H. Hall New Lisbon 

Clyde Kennedy Berkeley, Cal 

Clarence Macy - Scott City, Kan 



24 



Everett Macy Scott City, Kan 

Carroll Mills Kirksville, Mo 

Cecil Newby Englewood, Kan 

*Jeanette Rifner 

Pernia Thornburg (Griffin) Messex, Col 

John R. Thompson New Castle 

1901 Ira E. Bell New Castle, R F D 2 

Bertha E, Butler (Ballard) Lewisville 

Raymond Byrket Lewisville 

Jennie Compton (Cope) Dnnreith 

Everette Cope .. Dunreith 

Deborah Edwards Knightstown, R F D 

Ethel Edwards (Krarnein) Bloomington, 111 

Lillian H. Hayes Dunreith 

Walter B. Harvey Pittsburg, Pa 

John R. Hinshaw New Castle 

Everest Macy Scott City, Kan 

Georgia Millikan (Hardy) Pendleton 

Jennie E. Millikan (Wright) Fdinburg 

Homer Nugen Lewisville 

Cora E. Risk (Deem) Spiceland 

Robert A. Roberts... New Albany 

Grace E. Stewart (Johnson) Greenfield 

Russell L. Wright Portland, Oregon 

Walter C. Wilson . Pasadena, Cal 

1902 Harley Anderson Spiceland 

Jessie Baily Spiceland 

Mary Butler ---_-- -New Castle, R F 1) 1 

Walter Byers Knightstown, R F D I 

Jennie Kirk (Kerr) Dayton, 

Guerney Maple Whittier, Cal 

Manning Smith Philadelphia, Pa 

Rena Thomas Fountain City 

Retta Thomas .Fountain City 

Russell Wilson ._ Whittier, Cal 

India Yost (Cook). ..Sulphur Springs 

1903 Rilla Bartlett (Harvey) Pittsburg, Pa 

Nellie Beckett Whittier, Cat 

Kerr in Holt New Castle 

Arthur Johnson _ Lewisville 

25 



Carl Newby . Mulhall, Okla 

Rupert Redic El Paso, Texas 

Ralph Stubbs Spiceland 

Walter Wright Edinburg 

1904 *Elsie Bell ( Applegate; 

Josephine Beeson (Niles). Charlottesville 

Will Benedict Los Angeles, Cal 

Lawrence Bridges Greenfield 

Warren Edwards Lewisville 

Irl Evans Mt. Summit 

Jessie Gordon (Newby) Richmond 

Ruth Harvey Dunreith 

Hazel Heacock (Yockey) Spiceland 

Homer Henley Muskogee, Okla 

Claire Hoover (May) .Indianapolis 

Barton Jones Indianapolis 

Belva Jordan (Coffin) New Castle, K F D 1 

Guy May. Indianapolis 

Pansy Newby Lewisville 

Anna Painter New Castle, R F D 1 

Clara Patterson (Rothrock)__^___New Castle, K F D 1 

Lois Pitts Morristown, R F D 

Wendell Pitts Morristown, R F D 

Lawrence Reeves Knights town 

Robert Reeves Wilkinson 

Etta Rifner (Parker) Spiceland 

John Rogers Mooreland 

♦Herbert 'Seaford 

Ralph Silver San Francisco, Cal 

Bernetha Smith Muncie 

Charles Veach Mt. Summit 

Ethel Wright (Hershaur) Spiceland 

Harold Yockey- Oklahoma City, Okla 

1905 Elsie Anderson (Conwell) Mooreland 

Walter Brandy- Richmond 

Raymond Duke. Indianapolis 

Alexander Gano Indianapolis 

Oran Griffin Indianapolis 

Ruth Gardner New Castle, R F D 1 

Elva Kennard (Mueller) New Castle 



25 



Aura Lane (Lee) Lewisville 

Edward Pope New Castle, R F D 6 

Jessie Reece Long Beach, Cal 

Ruby Reeves. Knightstown 

Anna Reeves Wilkinson, R F D 2 

♦Arthur Rifner ._ 

Arden Stubbs Spiceland 

Everett Test Spiceland 

Amy Thomas [Sherry] Greenfield 

Paul Wilson New Castle 

1906 Charles Bundy Muncie 

Walter Bundy Montello, Mass 

Arthur Hudelson New Castle, R F D 

Hazel Hudelson Ounreith 

*Edna Kellar. 

Frances Nugen Hagerstown 

Myron Painter _. Spiceland 

Edgar Rogers Mooreland 

Otis Shaffer- Richmond 

Maud Simmons [Bolin] Zanesville, O 

Grover VanDine Shirley 

Orville Wright- .New Castle, R F D 

1907 Hazel Bartlett Lewisville 

Irene Bell [Wright] Whittier, Cal 

Bertha Bowers [Rogers] Mooreland 

Ruby McDaniel [Rutherford]. Carthage 

Levinus Painter. Hartford, Conn 

Howard Seaford Spiceland 

Clenna Smith [Moffitt] Lewisville 

Hassel Williams. Muncie 

1908 Herschel Alf . Lewisville 

Clara Burcham [Hinshaw] New Castle 

Ethel Chandler [Swindell] Greensboro 

Loma Delon Spiceland 

Margaret Harden Knightstown, R F D 

Ruby Julian [Reece]. .Washington, D. C 

Everett Kennard Knightstown, R F D 

Glenn Kirkham .Rushville, R F D 9 

Paul McDaniel ..Knightstown, R F D 3 

Vida Redic Cloudcroft, N. M 



27 



Hazel Reese [Clampett] Greensboro 

Bessie Sidwell St. Clairsville, 

Mary Seaford [Alf] ...Lewis ville 

Edna Swindell Greensboro 

Lucile Wilson Pasadena, Cal 

1909 Beula Arnold- New Castle, R F D 6 

Loren Butler Spiceland 

Marie Clarke [Little] Springfield 

Walter Hays Markleville 

Ruth Hudelson [Gold] New Castle, R F D 10 

Ethel Jackson [Clayton] Straughn 

Ada Jarrett [Hinshaw] Kennard 

Lucile Mcllvaine Lewisville 

James McGrady New Castle 

Griffin Moffitt- ...Knightstown, R F D 

Alma Osborn Winchester, R F D 

Elgar Pennington . Spiceland 

Ho\t Reese Whittier, Cal 

Hazel Skaates [Hance] Newman 

Minnie Simmons [Staley] Wilkinson 

Margaret Smith Spiceland 

Clayton Teeter Mooreland 

Ross Williams Chicago, III 

Terry Wilson . Spiceland 

1910 Mary Antrim [ Wilson] Spiceland 

Helen Bartlett [Pottenger] Indianapolis 

Clarence Cartw right Lewisville 

Nettie Grissom [Allen] New Castle 

Marie Hendricks Straughn 

Be mice Hcnshaw Dunreith 

Mary Jessup Modoc 

Minnie Riser [Boyd] New Castle 

Andrew Markle. Middle town 

Ruth May. ..Straughn 

Ruth Moffett Spiceland 

Clarence Rich Mays, R F I) 25 

Hazel Seaford [VVinan] Eaton, O 

Lena Shively [Test] NewCaslle, R F D 

William Smith Spiceland 

Edith Stigleman [Moffitt] Knightstown, R F D 



28 



Leanna Taylor [McNew] Knightstown 

Ralph Test New Castle, R F D 1 

Kerney Wilson Spiceland 

1911 Roy Brown Spiceland 

Howard Caldwell .Indianapolis 

Hazel Cochran [Lane] Spiceland 

Ruha Cochran [Symons] Lewisville 

Ralph Evans Spiceland 

Decil Fields Spiceland 

Ruth Harvey Spiceland 

Howard Harvey . New Castle 

Clarence Hoffman Spiceland 

Myra Hunnicutt [Heard] Economy 

Margaret Hunnicutt [Stuart] Hagerstown 

Grace Myers [Hoover] New Castle, R F D 

Myra Painter Richmond 

Everett Pennington - Spiceland 

Erma Pierson [Smullenj Lewisville 

Rex Potterf Lewisville 

Merwin Symons Lewisville 

Ernestine Williams [Millikan] New Castle 

1912 Sadie Bacon Mt Summit 

Dorothy Hell Whittier, Cal., R F D 

Ralph Chandler. .-..Spiceland 

Edith Chew [Mofliit] Knightstown 

Ruth Conner Lewisville 

Gertrude DeWiite Straughn 

Russell Ewing Knightstown 

Paul Fletcher . Lewisville 

Alvin Hardin Knightstown 

Martha Hays Markleville 

Melissa Lane Spiceland 

Mabel Macy [Hardin] Knightstown 

Exie Moffett Spiceland 

Clara Montgomery Dunreith 

Norma Pierson Lewisville 

Rachel Test Spiceland 

Margaret Toohey Spiceland 

Audrey West Markleville 

1913 Mabel Buck [Symons].. Spiceland 



29 



Addie Butler. New Castle, R F D 

Marie Bundy Spiceland 

Olive DeWitte Straughn 

Jessie Draper Spiceland 

Anna Evans- Spiceland 

Iris Hall Hagerstown 

Georgia Hodson [Wilson] Knightstown 

Floss Kiser Dunreith 

Mildred Mercer. Spiceland 

Hazel Moffitt [Price] Knightstown 

Leonora Pickett Dunreith 

Lydia Sellers ^..Spiceland 

Raymond Stubbs Cambridge City 

Zola Waddell Dunreith 

Ercel Wilson Spiceland 

1914 Marie Black New Castle 

Harold Brown Straughn 

Helen Daugherty Treaty 

Cortez Ewing ..Knightstown 

Pauline Haisley Spiceland 

Fred Hardin Knightstown, R F D 2 

Carl Jarrett ..New Castle, R F D 

Lowell Jefferies New Castle, R F D 2 

Irene McDaniel Markleville 

Albert Mcllvaine Lewisville 

Marie Modlin - .Spiceland 

Agnes Pennington.. Spiceland 

Vivian Pickering _ ..Spiceland 

Clyde Rogers Dunreith 

Maurine Shepherd- New Castle 

Mary Swain Greensboro 

Norman Woodward New Castle, K F D 



30 






1915-1916 

SPICELAND ACADEMY 

SPICELAND, INDIANA 



FACULTY AND CALENDAR 



For the Academic Year 1916-1917 



INSTRUCTORS 



JOSEPH H. BLOSE, A. B., Superintendent 
History 

To be supplied 
English and Vocal Music 

Robert Fisher, B. S. 
Mathematics and Science 

Clara Kendall, A. B. 
Language and Science 

Mrs. Adella H. Ratcliff 
Pianoforte 



CALENDAR 



1916 

Fall Term begins Monday, September 4 
Fall Term ends Friday, December 23 

1917 

Winter Term begins Monday, January 1 
Winter Term ends Friday, March 9 
Spring Term begins Monday, March 19 

Commencement, Friday, May 215 



BOARD OF TRUSTEES 



John S. Griffin, President 

Edwin B. RatclifT, Secretary and Treasurer 

Clarence Painter 

William Smith 

James Holtsclaw 

Charles B. Harvey 



INSTRUCTORS 



Academic Year 1!)15-1!)16 

HOMER H. COOPER, A. M., Superintendent 
History 

Anna Painter, A. B. 
English and Music 

Robert Fisher, B. S. 
Mathematics and Science 

Clara Kendall, A. B. 
Latin and German 

Mrs. Adclla H. RatclilT 
Music and Pianoforte 



Spiceland Academy 




HISTORY 

SPICELAND ACADEMY is the oldest academy in charge of the 
Friends in Indiana. It was chartered as an academy in 1870, 
but its history as a Friends' school extends over a period of 
eighty years. It is under the control of the Spiceland Monthly 
Mooting, by which the Board of Trustees is appointed. The teachers 
are selected by the Trustees. While the school is under denomina- 
tional control, it is not sectarian in the least; its foundation rests up- 
on Christian culture ; it has been kept under strong Christian influ- 
ences, and its purpose is to develop practical, earnest, and active 
Christian manhood and womanhood. 

The first class graduated in 1870. The Alumni Association now 
enrolls four hundred seventy-seven. About three thousand five hun- 
dred students have received instruction in the school since its organi- 
zation as an academy. The Course of Study and the Methods of 
Teaching are kept conservative in character and thoroughly progres- 
sive in spirit. 

LOCATION 

Spiceland Academy is located in the beautiful town of Spiceland, 
Indiana, in the southern part of Henry county, on the Lake Erie &. 
Western railroad, two miles north of Dunreith, on the Pennsylvania 
railroad. The buildings are situated in the midst of a beautiful grove, 



adjoining which is a large campus, well adapted to athletic sports. 
The interurban street car line gives connection with surrounding cities. 

Spiceland Academy has a new and thoroughly modern building- 
well heated, well lighted, and well ventilated. Besides the gymnasium 
it has ten commodious rooms, all devoted to high school purposes. The 
rooms for Sciences, Manual Training and Domestic Science are es- 
pecially suited for their purposes. The sanitary water supply system 
is used. The library has been brought up to date, und is one of the 
finest reference libraries in similar secondary schools. In the new 
building there is an abundance of room for the regular recitations and 
for prcvocational work. Excellent equipment has been furnished for 
the proper teaching of all subjects for secondary schools. The build- 
ing has been arranged and every facility given for keeping Spiceland 
Academy in the very highest rank of schools. 

ENTRANCE 

Students may enter at any time, but students coming from other 
schools are required to bring certificates stating their literary and 
moral standing. In the absence of approved certificate, examinations 
will he held and students classified accordingly. 

The conditions for admission to the First Year class are the same 
as for entrance to the public high schools of this state. 

In general, a graduate from non-commissioned high schools of this 
county can enter the Academy with credit for the number of months' 
work he has studied in his home school wherein the work is up to the 
standard of the commissioned high school. 

THE COURSE OF STUDY 

The Academy Course of Study conforms to the requirements of 
the State Hoard of Education. In addition many elective subjects are 
offered, and thus a student may prepare for any college, or more thor- 
oughly equip himself for his life's work. The Course of Study has 
been arranged with two purposes in view : — 

First It is prepared to comform to the needs and desires of all 
students who may not have the opportunity to pursue a college course, 
but who desire a practical education which will prepare them to lead 
an active and a successful life. 

Second- It is arranged to enable students to make the necessary 
preparation for admission into college without examination. 

8 



THE ENGLISH COURSE 

The completion of the English Course will entitle one to a certifi- 
cate of credit. It is intended for those who have no expectation of at- 
tending college, but who wish to be prepared as well as possible for 
their work in life. 

It is to be understood that the College Preparatory Course is the 
one required for college entrance requirements. 

BIBLE STUDY 

The study of the Bible is considered of so much importance that 
arrangements have been made by which it will be taught in the Acad- 
emy. The subject will be made an elective one. Credit will be given 
as in other studies. This will be one of the most valuable studies in 
the course, and it is hoped many will take advantage of the work. 

STATE CERTIFICATE OF EQUIVALENCY 

The State Board of Education has given the Academy a Certificate 
of Equivalency. This enables the graduates to enter any college in 
the State without an examination. 





FIRST YEAR 


SECOND YEAR 


JUNIOR 


SENIOR 


Required 


English 
Algebra 


English 
Geonle! ry 
Ancient Hist'ry 


English 


English 
American History 
and Civics 


Elective 


Latin 
German 
Botany _ 
Domestic 
Science 
Manual 
Ti aining 
Physical 
Geography 

(Any (wo) 


Latin 
German 
Domestic 
Science 
Manual 
Training 
or 

Any of lirst yr. 
not taken 

(Any one) 


Latin 
German 
Algebra V, year 
Solid Geometry 

! '■■ year 
Manual Training 
Domestic Science 
Modem History 
Any of first or 
second years not 
taken 
(Any three) 


Latin 
German 
Physics 
Arithmetic li year 
Bible V'i year 
English History 
Nature study, or any 
subject not taken in 
1st, 2nd or 3rd years, 

(Any two) 



In addition to those mentioned above, the following electives may 
be taken : Advanced English, Vocal or Instrumental Music, Drawing, 
Agriculture, Bookkeeping, Trigonometry, Chemistry, Astronomy, 
Business Law, Political Economy, Typewriting, Mechanical Drawing, 
or any special elective. 



MANUAL TRAINING, AGRICULTURE, BOOKKEEPING 

The Board of Trustees is making special preparation for the teach- 



ing of the practical subjects demanded by the spirit of the times. 
Special courses in Manual Training, Domestic Science, Agriculture, 
and Bookkeeping are offered. Those of our young people who do not 
expect to attend college may now have the opportunity in the Acade- 
my of securing an education in those subjects especially desired by 
them. 

Students who wish to do post-graduate work will have an excel- 
lent opportunity to study in elective subjects. 

Advanced classes in any of the lines of study will be formed when- 
ever a sufficient number of pupils desire the higher work. The diplo- 
ma of the Academy will admit the student to any of the colleges in 
Indiana or of other States without entrance examinations. 

Higher classes in any subject or classes in subjects not offered 
will be formed whenever there is sufficient demand. Satisfactory 
work in these studies may be substituted for work in regular course at 
the discretion of the Superintendent. 

The course of study makes provision for a number of electives, 
thus giving the student an opportunity to select work along the line 
of his preference. 

It is especially urged that all pupils take the regular College Pre- 
paratory Course of study, and after graduation attend college, if pos- 
sible. 

Increased advantages are offered in the arrangements made to 
take elective work in the following departments : Drawing, Music, 
and Prevocational work. 

ENGLISH 

I. English Composition. 

The aim of this course is to give the student, a practical knowl- 
edge in the principles of English composition. Every student should 
be abb' to use correctly his own language, both in writing and in 
speaking. Two recitations per week are given in this study during 
each year of the Academic course. The student is required to write 
at least one short theme each week. The theme is then discussed by 
the class and carefully criticised by the teacher. 

1st year— Composition and Grammar. 

2nd year— Composition and Rhetoric. 

3rd year — Composition and Rhetoric. 

4th year— Term Essays and Rhetoric. 

10 



II. English Literature. 

The purpose of this course is to create an interest in literature for 
its own sake and to increase the culture of the student by developing 
a love for the best in thought and style. This can be done only by a 
thorough study of the masterpieces of the most important English and 
American writers. It is desired to emphasize that the reading of the 
following selections does not constitute the proper study of literature. 
The time element is important. To receive credit for a year's work 
requires nine months' time under the careful supervision of an exper- 
ienced teacher. 

First Year. I, Longfellow's Poems ; Stevenson's Treasure Is- 
land ; Dickens' Christmas Carol and The Cricket on the Hearth; one 
book in outside reading ; II, Whittier's Poems ; Shakespeare's Mer- 
chant of Venice ; Irving's Sketch Book ; one book in outside reading. 

Second Year. I, Scott's Ivanhoe; Lady of the Lake; Eliot's Silas 
Marner; one book in outside reading. II, Sir Roger de Coverley Pa- 
pers; Macaulay's Lays of Ancient Rome; Shakespeare's Julius Ca?sar; 
Lamb's Old China and Other Essays ; Selected Poems of Coleridge 
and Campbell ; one book in outside reading. 

Third Year. I, Lowell's Poems ; Washington's Farewell Address 
and Webster's Bunker Hill Oration ; Hawthorne's Twicetold Tales ; 
Poe's Tales ; one book in outside reading. II, Lincoln's Cooper Union 
Address ; Macaulay's Speeches on Copyright, ; Shakespeare's As You 
Like It; First View of American Literature by Moody, Lovett and 
lioynton ; one book in outside reading. 

Fourth Year. I, A First View of English Literature by Moody, 
Lovett and Boynton ; Shakespeare's Hamlet and Twelfth Night; Mil- 
ton's Short Poems; one book in outside reading. II, Burke's Concilia- 
tion; Selections from The Golden Treasuray of Palgrave; Tennyson's 
Poems ; Shakespeare's Macbeth ; one book in outside reading. 

HISTORY 

The course in History is now arranged to conform to the recom- 
mendations of the Committee of Seven of the American Historical 
Association. 

Besides the culture value of history, it is to be remembered that 
it is the study which furnishes the students the ideals of character 
which lead to the highest moral growth. The student should thor- 
oughly understand the institutional life of the people studied. 

'il 



The purposes of history in the Academy are as follows : 

First. The development of moral character. History as the study 
of institutiona life and of character teaches us to watch the progress 
of humanity in the rise and fall of nations. Success or failure in nat- 
ional life or in the life of a person will cause us to adopt for ourselves 
and our country that which has proved of excellent worth. History 
helps us to avoid the mistakes of other people and nations. 

Second. The teaching of patriotism and the broadening of our in- 
terests and sympathies. While we wish to be familiar with our own 
government and national character, we must recognize the broad prin- 
ciple of the universal brotherhood of men. 

Third. The development of our powers of judgment. It is here 
that we especially study the relation between cause and effect. Every 
statesman has been a student of history. In studying the problems 
of life which have confronted other people we are greatly aided in the 
practical solution of the life problems of today. 

Fourth. The acquirement of useful facts. This, though general- 
ly considered of most importance, is in fact but a subordinate purpose 
in the study of history. 

Fifth. The gaining of a broad and practical general culture. The 
work consists of a study of Ancient History in the second year; a spe- 
cial study of Medieval and Modern History in the third year ; of Eng- 
lish History in the third year; United States History and Civil Gov- 
ernment in the fourth year. 

MATHEMATICS 

Tin; aid of this study is to introduce the student to mathematical 
methods and develop in hitn the power to reason clearly and accurately 
on any given problem. Algebra is studied throughout the first year of 
the high school and the first half of the third year; Geometry during 
the second year and through the last half of the third year. A great 
deal of supplementary work is given in Algebra, and original exercises 
are introduced as much as possible in Geometry. Arithmetic in an 
elective study. 

LATIN 

There is no subject in the Academy which has greater disciplinary 
value to the pupil than the study of Latin. It trains and strengthens 
the memory, cultivates and quickens the perception, and develops hab- 
its of ready, accurate and sound thinking. 

12 



A very large per cent, of all the words used in the dictionary will 
be of Latin origin, therefore some knowledge of this subject is abso- 
lutely necessary for a correct understanding of our own English lan- 
guage. It gives us a key to a quicker nnderstanding of all that we 
read or hear. It is essential to all who are to continue work in college. 
It is helpful to every professional man. It will give us a greater ap- 
preciation of the Latin writers and speakers. It increases our general 
culture and contributes to our broader discipline. 

The College Preparato.y Course is required of all who expect to 
attend college. In general cases, to fit the student for college, equiv- 
alent subjects may be substituted. 

SCIENCE 

Pre vocational Studies 

In Domestic Science one year's work will be given. This will con- 
sist of the following : 

I. A study of foods and their preparation. 

II. Sewing. 

III. House Furnishing. 

IV. Laundry Work. 

V. Hygiene — study of the care of the body— of diseases, etc. 
In Manual Training, there will be a study of the elements of me 

chanical drawing and wood finishing. There will be the practical con- 
struction of various useful articles. 

The principles of Agriculture will consist of the study of Soils and 
fertility of farm and garden crops, of horticulture, dairying and hus- 
bandly. 

In all prevoeational work the student will have the very best op- 
portunity of learning the practical side of the work. Each of these 
studies will be given five days in the week throughout the year. 

The Academy is supplied with sufficient apparatus to be a valuable 
aid in the study of natural sciences. In Physics the subject is illustra- 
ted by many simple pieces of apparatus, besides the air pump, electri- 
cal machine, batteries, etc. Geology and Mineralogy are illustrated 
by a collection of more than twelve hundred specimens, presented to 
the Academy by the Alumni. In Zoology and Hotany, animals and 
plants are studied from nature, and systems of classification are made 
prominent. In all the sciences objects are used as much as possible. 

The following are the purposes of science work : 

13 



First. To interest the pupil in the observation of nature. 

Second. To develop the power of reasoning through the original 
investigation of the truths of nature. 

Third. To give a practical knowledge of the elementary principles 
of those sciences which are now, in a great measure, causing our rapid 
progress in the civilization of the world. 

MUSIC 

Both voice and piano are taught by experienced teachers and credit 
will be given for the completion of the required work. 

I. Piano. In the Piano Course, pupils must have gained sufficient 
ability in sight-reading and execution, to enable them to take up the 
work in the course, which is equivalent to the first year of college 
work ; and shall have advanced during the year sufficiently to be able 
to appear in recital. 

The fundamental purpose in the piano course will be to supply am- 
ple training in the various types of musical literature, represented in 
the grades attained, and so to instill a love for the best in music, that 
the amateur as well as the student who wishes later to specialize in 
music, will find the work comprehensive. 

The work will be based upon 

I. Mason's System of Fundamental Technics. 

'I. A knowledge of Scale Formation and Chord Construction. 
\\. Studies from such noted teachers and composers as Heller, 
Czerny, Bertini, for iluency and assurance in playing and sight-reading. 

4. - Sonatas and compositions from classic and modern composers, 
and— 

5. The study of History of Music. 

No lessons t^ill be excused utiles* nbsence from school is necessary be- 
cause of illness, a ml when due notice has been given; .inch lessons ore to be 
maiir op during the seincMer in which they occur, unless in cast oj protract- 
ed illness. 

Piano Course, one private lesson of 45 minutes per week and one 
class lesson in History and Theory in two weeks- $10.00 per semester. 

II. Voice. In vocal music the work will consist of the following: 

1. The development of the voice through the training of the ear 
to the appreciation of perfect tones. 

2. The studies in the oratorios and songs from the masters of 
music. 

14 



3. A study of the history and development of music having in 
view both the acquaintance and appreciation of music. 

4. A study of the nature and tendency of modern music as se- 
lected from the best of modern composers. 

5. Special chorus singing leading to some public performances. 

GENERAL ITEMS 

The government of the school is based upon the idea that manhood 
is more than scholarship ; that self-respect and self-control on the 
part of a student are important factors in the formation of character. 
Greater stress is laid upon the thoroughness of instruction and accu- 
racy of knowledge than upon rapidity of advancement. 

For many years the health of students has been uniformly good. 
There is probably no better location in the State in this respect. 

The Friends and Methodists both hold religious services on the 
Sabbath and each maintains a Sabbath school. Meetings of the 
Young People's Society of Christian Endeavor and the Epworth 
League are held every Sabbath evening, and students are welcome to 
their meetings and membership. 

A sufficient number of teachers is constantly employed so that 
large classes may be avoided, and students may receive personal at- 
tention. 

Expenses are as low as at any other school affording equal ad- 
vantages. 

The managers of the school are very careful to make this an in- 
stitution in which students who are away from home and its restraints 
will be surrounded by good, moral influences, and in this they have 
the co-operation of the citizens of the village. There are no beer, 
liquor or billiard saloons in the village. 

No student whose influence is known to have a corrupting tenden- 
cy, will be retained in the school. 

DIPLOMAS 

Students whose conduct, is exemplary, and who complete the 
course of study and prepare and deliver a suitable literary production, 
will be furnished a diploma, signed by the instructors and the Presi- 
dent and Secretary of the Board of Trustees. To receive a diploma a 
student should be in attendance at the Academy one year, except 
when special arrangements are made with the Superintendent and 
Board of Trustees. 



15 



LECTURES 



Students have the opportunity to hear good lectures at small ex- 
pense. Addresses on various subjects are given during the year. 

LITERARY EXERCISES 

Literary exercises may be required of all students in all grades, 
both in class work and before the public. Care is used that students 
may learn the art of composition and public delivery. Essays and 
declamations are a part of the regular school work in the department 
of oratory. 

LIBRARIES 

Five sets of encyclopedias are in the school rooms, and these, 
with the dictionaries and numerous reference books, are for the free 
use of all. There is a large library in connection with the school, 
which comprises about three thousand volumes. 

The texts adopted by the State Board of Education are used in 
the Academy. 

EXPENSES 
RATES OF 1 U1TION 

Students who enter at irregular times will be charged full tuition 
for the term in case they complete the term's work in such manner as 
to receive credit toward the diploma. 

Special students and others who do not expect to earn credit in 
the regular course will be charged only for the time of actual enroll- 
ment in the classes. 

Occasionally those who are especially strong are permitted to earn 
credits by outside study under the supervision of the teachers. For 
such credits as these one-half the regular tuition will be charged. 

Tuition is due at the opening of each term, and settlement should 
be made with the Superintendent or the Treasurer of the Board of 
Trustees. Students will receive no credit for their work until the 
tuition is paid. 

HOARDING 

The citizens of Spiceland have always given the students a hearty 
welcome by receiving them into their homes. The cost of hoarding 
and rooms in private families where everything is furnished can he 
had for $3.00 to $4.00 a week. 

Persons who may live near enough to go home at the end of the 

16 



week, and who wish to economize, may reduce the cost of living to 
very small sum. 



LIST OF STUDENTS 
SENIORS 

Antrim, Earl Jay, Menia 

Brenneman, Venton Jeffries, Marion 

Brewer, Ruby Mercer, Clyde 

Deem, Claude Pennington, Irene 

Gordon, Royden Poer, Edward 

Hill, Ezra Ratliff, Ruth 

Holloway, Ruth Templeton, Arnold 

Holloway, Hazel Thomas, Mark 

Hoffman, Marie True, Nellie 



JUNIORS 

Butler, Mary McNew, Hildred 

Copeland, Vernon McFarland, Ralph 

Essington, Cash Pate, Grace 

Ewing, Hollis Pike, Myron 

Gannaway, Caroline Poarch, Damon 

Gannaway, Hugh Poer, Emma 

Hinshaw, Howard Ratliff, Hazel 

Kimbrel, (Men Wilson, Georgia 



Addison, Edna 
Brennaman, Veda 
Chandler, Gertrude 
Copeland, Raymond 
Edwards, Marble 
Gran, Robert 
GrilTin, Price 
Harrold, Glcnna 
Ilenshaw, Clinton 
Hinshaw, Robert 



SOPHOMORES 

Hoff, Harold 
Hudelson, Marie 
Jackson, Opal 
Kirk, Park 
McNew, Arland 
Painter, Edna 
Pennington, Leslie 
Pickering, Pauline 
Pierson, Ruth 



17 



Byrket, Blonde 
Brcnnaman, Oran 
Ballard, Mary 
Black, Nellie 
Coffin, Otis 
Coffin, William 
Deem, Dorothy 
Hibben, Lucile 
Holloway, Evelyn 
Holloway, George 
Kern, Obed 
Lamb, Willard 



Chambers, Nina 
Chambers, Guy 
Griffin, Ruth 
Gray, Worth 
Hoff, Harold 
Hudolson, Marie 



FRESHMEN 

McFarland, Grace 
Millikan, Levara 
Mayes, George 
McNew, Earl 
McNew, Donald 
Shepherd, Horace 
Shepherd, Dwight 
Starbuck, Hobert 
Templeton, Maurine 
Thompson, Garland 
I Wilson, Carrie 

IRREGULAR 

Ballard, Maud 
James, Kathrina 
McGrady, George 
Bate, Grace 
Swindell, .lohn 



LIST OF ACADEMY SUPERINTENDENTS 

Oliver Bales 1859-1863 William P. Pinkham.... 

Clarkson Davis 1863-1867 

Edward Taylor 1807-1808 

Clarkson Davis 1808-1874 

Timothy Wilson 1874-1870 

Clarkson Davis ..1876-1882 

Thomas Newlin 1882-1883 



Thomas Newlin 

J. Frank Brown 

Arthur W. Jones 
George W. Neet.. .. 
Murray S. Wildman 
M. S. Woods 



1884- 1885 

1885- 1892 

1892- 1893 

1893- 1894 

1894- 1898 
1898-1901 
1901-1903 



Homer H. Cooper 1903-1910 



18 



ALUMNI 



OFFICERS FOR 19I6-1917 

President Merritt Stafford 

Vice-President Aura Lane Lee 

Secretary Mabel Symons 

Treasurer Fred Hardin 

Orator Walter Bundy 

Vice-Orator Rex Potterf 

Historian Virginia Cory 

Vice-Historian Bernice Henshaw 

( Herbert T. Baily 

Executive Committee / Vivian Pickering 

( Marie HolFman 



Those marked (*) are deceased. 

1870 "Eli U. Cook ... 

John J. Stubbs. Omaha, Neb 

1871 * Walter D. Jones 

*Alvin H. Jenkins ... 

•I. Macy Good ... 

C. R. Dixon _ _ Paonia, Col 

R.G.Boone Berkeley, Cal 

Dallas Sisson Spiceland 

Mary Ballenger-Barnard New Castle 

Louisa Wickersham ... Spiceland 

Lida Edwards-Saint . .. New Castle 

1872 Lindley II. Johnson ...Dunreith 

*David Henley 

♦Jacob Hill... ,.. __ ... 

Henry W. Painter ...New Castle, R F D 1 

Robert G, Mitchell ... Pacific Grove, Cal 

1873 'Sadie I). Talbert- Wright 

Aaron li. Bell Spring town, Ark 

\J. Til man Hutchins . . 

John Pennington Damascus, O 



19 



Mary Stubbs-Painter New Castle, R F D 1 

. Nathan Williams Oswego, Kan 

S. Carrie Talbert-Newby_ Wichita, Kan 

1874 Alice Coffin-Russell New York City 

Alvira Spencer-Harold Indianapolis 

J. P. Edwards Knightstown 

William S. Moffett Kennard 

Edwin 0. Kennard . ._ Pasadena, Cal 

Nathan Rosenberger ..Muscatine, Iowa 

♦W. E. Jackson 

D. C. Mitchell Spiceland 

1875 W. W. Gregg \ — Indianapolis 

William Pidgeon . ... Bloomington 

Jrvin Stanley Westfield 

1877 Milton Roberts Linnville, Iowa 

1878 S. Ella P.ogue-Dogget . Danville, Va 

Belle Chambers-Bailey . . . Richmond 

J. Pinkney Mitchell Seattle, Wash 

Thomas Mitchell Olin, N C 

Flora Moore-Brady Lincolnville 

♦John 0. Reed.. - - 

♦William Seaford . 

Fannie Thornburg-Parsons Oak Park, 111 

1879 J. A. Buck Terre Haute 

Carrie Good win- Jeffrey New Castle 

Thomas Newlin Greensboro, N C 

1880 J. Edgar Cloud... San Diego, Cal 

William N. Lamb San Francisco, Cal 

Mattie Lamb Outland Amboy 

Ada Grace Murphy Chattanooga, Tenn 

Ida May Roberts ... -- Bolder, Col 

Emma Belle Roberts ..Bolder, Col 

Frank Symons Portland, Maine 

Lamira Trueblood-Kellum Camby, Ind 

1881 Oscar R. Baker Winchester 

*Corrie Bogue -, 

Minnie Benedict-Blankenship ' Paragon 

Carrie Unthank-Kellum Indianapolis 

♦Jessie Strattofi — 



20 



1882 *Arthur H. Baily.. 

J. Newton Barnard .. Daleville 

Harriet Bogue-Newlin Indianapolis 

Harriet E. Dickinson Spiceland 

Charles Newlin . .. Indianapolis 

1883 Anna Huddelson-Foster Washington, D C 

Ryland Ratliff .... Danville 

Julia StafFord-Newby New Castle R F I) 2 

Emily Weeks . .. Middletown, RFD1 

1884 + Cora Kirk 

Ella Stratton-Hodson New Castle, R F D 10 

Virginia Gridin-Cory .. . .. Dunreith 

Isadore Hall-Wilson . .. .. Spicehmd 

William Julian ' Hastings, Neb 

Charles Nowby ... Converse 

1885 Mary L. Brown-Pennington Spiceland 

Alfred Y. King Mt. Vernon, 111 

Oliver C. Steele . _ Spiceland 

1886 L. Winnie Baily-Clement.... Haddonfield, N J 

Mattie E. Brown Daytonia, Fla 

Richard Broadbent . . Elwood 

Elbert Griffin . . ..... — Elwood 

Alonzo C. Hodson... New Castle, R F D 10 

♦John L. McNew — 

Russell Ratliff Marion 

1887 Herbert T. Baily Spiceland 

Clarence H. Beard ... Houston, Texas 

Anna K. Bogue-Shaffer Benton Harbon, Mich 

Lindley Compton Tomah, Wis 

Elizabeth S. Hiatt-Geneau . Omaha, Neb 

Abraham L. Miller ...Birmingham, Ala 

Bert Smith Zionsvillc 

1888 lihoda Ballenger-Cunningham... Indianapolis 

♦Hannah Brown-Stribhing 

Orynthia Brown-Jester .. Payton, Iowa 

♦Jessie Butler _ 

Clara G. Edwards-Knight St. Louis, Mo 

John C. Cook New Castle 

Elva Elliott-Compton Tomah, Wis 

21 



Achsah E. Ratcliff-Ratliff - Richmond 

Harmon H. Rayle Muncie 

Charles Stubbs Frankfort 

J. A. Greenstreet New Castle 

H. H. Ratcliff . . . . Connersville 

1889 Laura Benedict Indianapolis 

Blanch Braddock-McNew _ Greenfield 

Frank Copeland Dunreith 

Estella Deem-Kennedy Greensburg 

*Lawrence Gardner . ... 

Gertrude Gordon-Geneaux Victoria, Texas 

Sue Griffin-Evans Spiceland 

Otis Stubbs L Lewisville, R F D 

May White Pasadena, Cal 

1890 L. Etta Butler Lewisville, R F D 

El iner Deem Frank fort 

Edwin B. Ratcliff ... Spiceland 

Bonnie Stratton... New Castle, R F D 1 

S. E. Stubbs Wilkinson 

1891 Ethel E. Copeland-Lee Meadeville, Pa 

Louie Edmundson-Poe Indianapolis 

Maurine Gardner-Kern — ,. Cadiz 

Charles N. Hardy.-. Markleville 

Alice Hiatt-Copeland Cincinnati, 

Ernest Sisson Greenfield 

Alfred H. Symons Supai, Ariz 

Mary M. Teas-Parker Eaton, O 

Charles Titus Warrington 

Herbert D. Wopdard Chicago, 111 

1892 'Jesse S. Baily w g 

Clara Brown - Spiceland 

Warren T. Kvans... Can by, Minn 

John B. Greenstreet Lewisville, K V I) 

Winnie Hinshaw-Milligan Winchester 

David M. Kemp Kempton 

Alice Lawrence . Spiceland 

Estella Symons Minneapolis, Minn 

Al vin U lrich - - Greensboro 

1893 Oscar Bogue Spiceland 

Estella Charles-Fawcett ...Indianapolis 



22 



Floy Hill . Pasadena, Cal 

ArthuJ Holloway Spiceland 

Leora Jessup-Parker Scot City, Kan 

John Miller ...... New Castle 

*01en Payne 

Lena Rayle-Smith Spiceland 

George H. Smith New Castle 

Orville White Joplin, Mo 

1894 Minnie Black-Moore Chicago, 111 

Bessie I. Brown-Stone Daytonia, Fla 

Clarence V. Hall New Castle 

Horace Hardy - Markleville 

. Ida Holloway-Kenworthy Cambridge, Mass 

Arlie Hood Omaha, Neb 

Bertha Jessup Clay Center, Neb 

Lima Lawrence Spiceland 

Maude ML Shad'er-Byrket New Castle 

Frank Pitts Indianapolis 

Oscar F. Symons Minneapolis, Minn 

1895 Clarence Painter New Castle 

Mabel Wright-Gaar Cambridge City 

Edgar Cox Clark ton, N. C 

♦Nellie Ratliff 

Howard Henley Tuttle, Okla 

Maud Wildman-Evans Philadelphia, Pa 

Frank Hudelson . • Mays 

*Pearl Moffett-Wood 

189G Cora Hudson-Bogue Spiceland 

Clara White-Wildman Selma, 

Elsie Iludelson-Holland Brooklyn, N. Y 

Anna Morris- Wilson South Wabash 

Pearl M. James-Tweedy Wabash 

Mabel New by- Hood Omaha, Neb 

W. J. Carson Vancouver, B. C 

Nora Grill'm- Beach Richmond 

Theresa Wildman Philadelphia, Pa 

Roscoe Edwards. New Castle 

1897 Leoti Applegate-Coffin Spiceland 

Elva M. Hudson-Hall Spiceland 

Lois M. Henley Indianapolis 



23 



*Fannie Hayes 

Floy Hudelson Greenfield 

Josie B. Harland- Weatherman Dana 

Jessie Leakey-Hiatt New Lisbon 

Pearl Millikan-Hardy Markleville 

Ethel Rifner-Newby Englewood, Kan 

May me StatFord-Applegate Spiceland 

Clyde Sisson-Moore Indianapolis 

Minnie Stratton-Stafford New Castle, R F D 1 

Charles 11. Smith . Philadelphia, Pa 

*Irving White 

1898 Clifford Applegate Spiceland 

James Holtsclaw.j Spiceland 

*Bavis Nay 

Emory Ratcliff New Castle, 11 V D 

Gertrude Seaford Spiceland 

Pearl Symons-Rifner Spiceland 

Delia Smith-Rice Spiceland 

Charles A. Heard .. New York City 

Merritt Stafford Carthage 

Cora Smith-Sparks Summitville 

Walter Painter • Crown Point 

Bertha Charles-Hewitt Harlem, Mont 

Ernest ShocMey Angola 

Elsie Shoekley-Lockridge Shawnee, Okla 

1899 Bessie Haisley Alvin, Texas 

Bertha 0. Lawrence-McCracken Holgan, Cvba 

Florence 0. Macy-Parker Carthage 

Earl Moffett Knightst.own, R F 1)2 

Walter T. Pearee Rushville 

Orabell Shaffer-Bell New Castle, R V D 2 

1900 Ethel Applegate-Painter Spiceland 

Edgar Bazzle St Paul, Minn 

Susan Benedict-Nay . Springport 

*Cora Charles-Carson 

Connie Cri din . . Knightstown 

David W. Cordon St. Louis 

Guy II. Hall New Lisbon 

Clyde Kennedy .. Berkeley, Cal 

Clarence Macy- Scott City, Kan 

24 



Everett Macy Scott City, Kan 

Carroll Mills Kirksville, Mo 

Cecil Newby Englewood, Kan 

*Jeanette Rifner . 

Pernia Thornhurg-Griffin Atwood, Col 

John R. Thompson New Castle 

1901 Ira E. Pell New Castle, R F D 2 

Bertha E. Butler-Ballard Lewisville 

Raymond Byrket Lewisville 

Jennie Compton-Cope Dunreith 

Everette Cope Dunreith 

Deborah Edwards Knightstown, R F D 

Ethel Edwards-Kramein Bloomington, 111 

Lillian H. Hayes Dunreith 

Walter B. Harvey Pittsburg, Pa 

John R. Hinshaw New Castle 

Everest Macy . Scott City, Kan 

Georgia Millikan-Hardy Pendleton 

Jennie E. IVI illikan- Wright . - Edinburg 

Horner Nugen Lewisville 

Cora E. Risk-Deem Spiceland 

Robert A. Roberts New Albany 

Grace E. Stewart-Johnson .'. Greenfield 

Russell L. Wright- New Caitle 

Walter C. Wilson . Pasadena, Cal 

1902 Harley Anderson Spiceland 

Jessie Paily-Pierce Knightstown 

Mary Butler - New Castle, R F D 1 

Walter Byers Knightstown, R F 1) 1 

Jennie Kirk-Kerr Prookville 

Guerney Maple Whittier, Cal 

Manning Smith Philadelphia, Pa 

Rena Thomas Fountain City 

Retta Thomas .... Fountain City 

Russell Wilson Whittier, Cal 

India Yost-Cook Sulphur Springs 

1903 Rilla Bartlctt-IIarvey PiUshitrg, Pa 

Nellie Beckett Whittier, Cal 

Renin Holt ... New Castle 

Arthur Johnson ... . Lewisville 



25 



Carl Newby Mulhall, Okla 

Rupert Redic El Paso, Texas 

Ralph Stubbs Spiceland 

Walter Wright Edinburg 

1904 m *Elsie Bell-Applegate 

Josephine Beeson-Niles Connersville 

Will Benedict. Los Angeles, Cal 

Lawrence Bridges Greenfield 

Warren Edwards Lewisville 

Irl Evans Mt. Summit 

Jessie Gordon-Newby Richmond 

Ruth Harvey Dunreith 

Hazel Heacock-Yockey Spiceland 

Homer Henley Muskogee, Okla 

Claire Hoover-May Indianapolis 

Barton Jones South Bend 

Belva Jordan-Coffin New Castle, R F D 1 

Guy May ... Indianapolis 

Pansy Newby Lewisville 

Anna Painter New Castle, RFD1 

Clara Patterson-Rothrock New Castle, R F D 1 

Lois Pitts - Morristown, RFD 

Wendell Pitts Morristown, R F D 

Lawrence Reeves Knightstown 

Robert Reeves Wilkinson 

Etta Rii'ner- Parker Indianapolis 

John Rogers - - Mooreland 

* Herbert Seaford 

Ralph Silver San Francisco, Cal 

Pernolha Smith - Muncie 

Charles Veach .. . - Mt. Summit 

Ethel Wright-Ilershaur Rushville 

Harold Yockey Oklahoma City, Okla 

1905 Elsie Anderson-Conwell ... Mooreland 

Walter Brandy Washington, Pa 

Ray mono Duke ....Indianapolis 

Alexander Gano ... Indianapolis 

Oran Griffin - Indianapolis 

Ruth Gardner New Castle, R F I ) 1 

Elva Kennard-Mueller..-: Newcastle 



26 



Aura Lane Lee Lewisville 

Edward Pope New Castle, R F D 6 

Jessie Recce Long Beach, Cal 

Ruby Reeves Knightstown 

Anna Reeves Wilkinson, R F D 2 

* Arthur Rifner .. 

Arden Stubbs .. Spiceland 

Everette Test.-- ...Spiceland 

Amy Thomas-Sherry ..... Greenfield 

Paul Wilson New Castle 

1906 Charles Bundy ... Muncie 

Walter Bundy Montello, Mass 

Arthur Hudson Connersville 

Hazel Hudelson.. _. Dunreith 

•Edna Kellar... 

Francis Nugen Hagerstown 

Myron Painter Spiceland 

Edgar Rogers ... Mooreland 

Otis ShalFer Richmond 

Maude Simmons-Bolin Zanesville, 

G rover Van Dine. — . Shirley 

Orville Wright New Castle, R F D 

1907 Hazel Bartlett Lewisvlile 

Irene Bell- Wright ..Whittier, Cal 

Bertha Bowers-Rogers Mooreland 

Ruby McDaniel-Retherford Knightstown 

Levinus Painter . Hartford, Conn 

Howard Seaford ... . . Spiceland 

Clenita Sraith-Moffitt Lewisville 

Basse! Williams . Muncie 

1908 Herschel All" Lewisville 

Clara Burcharn-Hinshaw .. New Castle 

Ethel Chandler-Swindell Greensboro 

Loma Delon ... Phoenix, Ariz 

Margaret Harden Knightstown, RFD 

Ruby Julian-Reece — Washington, D C 

Everette Kennard.. Knightstown, R F I) 

Glenn Kirkham . Rushville, R F I) 9 

Paul McDaniel Knightstown, R F I) A 

Vida Redic . Cloudcroft, N M 



27 



Hazel Reese-Clampett ... Greensboro 

Bessie Sidwell St. Clairsville, 

Mary Seaford-Alf _. Lewisville 

Edna Swindell ... ... Greensboro 

Lucile Wilson _ _ Pasadena, Cal 

1909 Beula Arnold New Castle, R F D 6 

Loren Butler Spiceland 

Marie Clarke-Little . . Springfield 

Walter Hays Markleville 

Ruth Hudelson-Gold .. . New Castle, R F D 10 

Ethel Jackson-Clayton . . Straughn 

Ada Jarrett-Hinshaw Kennard 

Lucile Mcllvaine J ... Lewisville 

James McGrady. .. New Castle 

Griffin Moffitt Knightstown, R F 1) 

Alma Osborn. . .. ... Winchester, R F L) 

Elgar Pennington Spiceland 

Hoyt Reese Whittier, Cal 

Hazel Skaates-Hance . Newman 

Minnie Sirnmons-Staley Knightstown 

Margaret Smith. Spiceland 

Clayton Teeter ... Mooreland 

Ross Williams ... .. Chicago, 111 

Perry Wilson New Castle 

1910 Mary Antrim-Wilson .. Spiceland 

Helen Bartlett-Pottenger Indianapolis 

Clarence Cartwright . . Lewisville 

Nettie Grissom-Allen New Castle 

Marie Hendricks Straughn 

Bernice Henshaw Dunreith 

Mary Jessup Modoc 

Minnie Kiser-Boyd . New Castle 

Andrew Markle -. Middletown 

Ruth May . Straughn 

Ruth Mollctt ...Richmond 

Clarence Rich. Mays, R V D 25 

Hazel Seaford-Winan Eaton, () 

Lena Shively-Test New Castle, R F 1) 

William Smith Spiceland 

Edith Stigleman-Moffitt. . Knightstown, RED 

28 



Leanna Taylor-McNew Knightstown, R F D 

Ralph Test New Castle, R F D 1 

Kerney Wilson Spiceland 

1911 Roy Brown . Spiceland 

Howard Caldwell Indianapolis 

Hazel Cochran-Lane Spiceland 

Ruba Cochran-Symons Lewisville 

Ralph Evans Spiceland 

Decil Fields- Woollam Spiceland 

Ruth A. Harvey Spiceland 

Howard Harvey New Castle 

Clarence Hofl'man Spiceland 

Myra Hunnicutt-Beard Economy 

Margaret Hunnicutt-Stuart Hagerstown 

Grace Myers-Hoover New Castle, R F D 

Myra Painter Spiceland 

Everett Pennington Spiceland 

Erma Pierson-Smullen Lewisville 

Rex Potterf ■ Lewisville 

Merwin Symons Lewisville 

Ernestine Williams-Millikan Brook Haven, Miss 

1912 Sadie Bacon Mt. Summit 

Dorothy Bell Spiceland 

Ralph Chandler Spiceland 

Edith Chew Moffitt Knightstown 

Ruth Conner Lewisville 

Gertrude DeWitte Straughn 

Russell Ewing Knightstown 

Paul Fletcher Lewisville 

Alvin Hardin Knightstown 

Martha Hayes-Hicks Markleville 

Melissa Lane Spiceland 

Mabel Macy-Hardin Knightstown 

Exie Moll'ett Richmond 

Clara Monlgomery-Bradway Knightstown 

Norma I'ierson Lewisville 

Rachel Test ..Spiceland 

Margaret Toohey Spiceland 

Audrey West-Hays Markleville 

1913 Mabel Buck-Symons Spiceland 

29 



Addie Butler : New Castle, R F D 

Marie Bundy Spiceland 

Olive DeWitte Straughn 

Jessie Draper Spiceland 

Anna Evans Spiceland 

Iris Hall Hagerstown 

Georgia Hodson- Wilson Knightstown 

Floss Riser Dunreith 

Mildred Mercer Spiceland 

Hazel Moflitt-Price Knightstown 

Lenora Pickett Dunreith 

Lydia Sellers ..Spieelann 

Raymond Stubbs Cambridge City 

Zola Waddell Dunreith 

Ercel Wilson-Richey Kokomo 

1914 Marie Black New Castle 

Harold Brown Straughn 

Helen Daugherty .... .Treaty 

Cortex Ewing Knightstown 

Pauline Haisley -Jackson . Morristown 

Fred Hardin Knightstown, R F D 2 

Carl Jarrett .. Spiceland 

Lowell Jefferies * New Castle, R F D 2 

Irene McDaniel Marleville 

Albert Mcllvaine . Lewisville 

Marie Modlin Marion 

Agnes Pennington Spiceland 

Vivian Pickering Spiceland 

Clyde Rogers Dunreith 

Maurine Shepherd New Castle 

Mary Swain Greensboro 

Norma Woodward New Castle, R F D 

1915 Frank Delon Greensboro 

Doris Evans Spiceland 

Wannetta Hall Hagerstown 

Louise Hill Spiceland 

Irene Pickering Spiceland 

Adrian Pratt St. Paul 

Paul Recce Knightstown 

Mildred Stewart New Castle, It F 1) 

Leslie Trobaugh - Dunreith 

30 




1916-1917 

SPICELAND ACADEMY 

SPICELAND, INDIANA 



FACULTY AND CALENDAR 

For lhc Academic Year 1917-1918 

INSTRUCTORS 

JOSEPH II. BLOSE, A. B., Superintendent 
History 

Florence E. Hadley, A. B. 
English, German and Vocal Music 

To be supplied 
Mathematics and Science 

Lola Haworth, A. B. 
Language and Domestic Science 

Mrs. Adella H. Ratcliff 
Pianoforte 

! 

Roy Wollam 
Bible 

CALENDAR 
iyi7 

Semester begins Monday, September 3 
Christmas vacation, Friday, December 21 

1918 

School resumes Monday, December 31 
Spring vacation, Friday, March 8 
School resumes Monday, March 18 
Commencement, Friday, May 24 



I 



BOARD OF TRUSTEES 

James Holtsclaw, President 

Edwin B. Ratcliff, Secretary and Treasurer 

Clarence Painter 

William Smith 

Morris Coffin 

Charles 15. Harvey 



INSTRUCTORS 



Academic Year 101G-1917 

JOSEPH H. 13 LOSE, A. M., Superintendent 
History 

Florence Hadley, A. B. 
English and Music 

! Mrs. M. J. Smith and Robert Fisher, B. S. 
Mathematics and Science 

Clara Kendall, A. B. 
Latin and German 

Mrs. Adella H. Ratcliff 
Music and Pianoforte 

Roy Wollam 
Bible 



r 

i 

Spiceland Academy 




HISTORY 

SPICELAND ACADEMY is the oldest academy in charge of the 
Friends in Indiana. It was chartered as an academy in 1870, 
but its history as a Friends' school extends over a period of 
eighty years. It is under the control of the Spiceland Monthly 
Meeting, by which the Board of Trustees is appointed. The teachers 
are selected by the Trustees. While the school is under denomina- 
tional control, it is not sectarian in the least; its foundation rests upon 
Christian culture ; it has been kept under strong Christian influences, 
and its purpose is to develop practical, earnest, and active Christian 
manhood and womanhood. 

The first class graduated in 1870. The Alumni Association now 
enrolls four hundred ninety-five. About three thousand five hundred 
students have received instruction in the school since its organization 
as an academy. The Course of Study and the Methods of Teaching 
are kept conservative in character and thoroughly progressive in spirit. 

LOCATION 

Spiceland Academy is located in the beautiful town of Spiceland, 
Indiana, in the southern part of Henry county, on the Lake Erie & 
Western railroad, two miles north of Dunreith, on the Pennsylvania 
railroad. The buildings are situated in the midst of a beautiful grove, 



i 



adjoining which is a large campus, well adapted to athletic sports. 
The interurban car line gives connection with surrounding cities. 

Spiceland Academy has a new and thoroughly modern building- 
well heated, well lighted, and well ventilated. Besides the gymnasium 
it has ten commodious rooms, all devoted to high school purposes. The 
rooms for Sciences, Manual Training and Domestic Science are es- 
pecially suited for their purposes' The sanitary water supply system 
is used. The library has been brought, up to date, and is one of the 
finest reference libraries in similar secondary schools. In the new 
building there is an abundance of room for the regular recitations and 
for prevocational work. Excellent equipment has been furnished for 
the proper teaching of all subjects for secondary schools. The build- 
ing has been arranged and every facility given for keeping Spiceland 
Academy in the very highest rank of schools. 

ENTRANCE 

Students may enter at any Lime, but students coming from other 
schools are required to bring certificates stating (heir literary and 
moral standing. In the absence of approved certificate, examinations 
will be held and students classified accordingly. 

The conditions for admission to the First Year class are the same 
as for entrance to the public high schools of this state. 

In general, a graduate from non-commissioned high schools of this 
county can enter the Academy with credit for the number of months' 
work he has studied in his home school wherein the work is up to the 
standard of the commissioned high school. 

THE COURSE OF STUDY 

The Academy Course of Study conforms to the requirements of 
the State Board of Education. In addition many elective subjects are 
offered, and thus a student may prepare for any college, or more thor- 
oughly equip himself for his life's work. The Course of Study has 
been arranged with two purposes in view : — 

First — It is prepared to conform to the needs and desires of all 
students who may not have the opportunity to pursue a college course, 
but who desire a practical education which will prepare them to lead 
an active and a successful life. 

Second It is arranged to enable students to make the necessary 
preparation for admission into college without examination. 



8 



STATE CERTIFICATE OF EQUIVALENCY 



The State Board of Education has given the Academy a Certificate 
of Equivalency. This enables the graduates to enter any college in 
the State without an examination. 

COURSES OFFERED 

The Academy is prepared to offer the following courses : 

English— The four, years' of work as outlined by the state. In ad- 
dition to this opportunity is given for work in public speaking. 

Foreign Language Four years' work may done in Latin or Ger- 
man. Should the demand arise Spanish may be offered. 

History — Greek, Roman, Medieval, Modern, Englis, and American. 

Mathematics— Algebra, Plane Geometry, Solid Geometry. 

Science General Science, Physical Geography, Botany, Physics. 

Commercial subjects Bookkeeping, Typewriting, Penmanship, 
Arithmetic. 

Pro- Vocational subjects - Agriculture, Domestic Science, Manual 
Training. 

Additional elective subjects— Piano, Bible, Mechanical Drawing, 
Commercial Geography, Drawing, Music, Trigonometry. 

CURRICULUM REQUIREMENTS 

I. Two majors of thirty hour3 each as follows : 

(a) Thirty hours in English. 

(I)) Thirty hours in some one study group, 1-6. 

II. Two minors of twenty hours each in any two of the remain- 

ing groups, l-<;. 

III. Ten hours in American History and Government. 

(Note). Provided, if a major is in group two, American 
History and Government may be counted toward complet- 
ing the major. 

IV. Music as given in Assembly. 
Study groups are as follows : 

1. Foreign Language. 

2. History. 

3. Mathematics. 

4. Science. 

5. Commercial subjects. 

(). Pre- vocational subjects. 
Students who expect to go to college are advised to take 130 credit 
hours of work in English and in groups 1-4. 



A credit hour is a study carried satisfactorily throughout a semes- 
ter one day each week. 

The requirements for graduation from commissioned high schools 
as given in Uniform Course of Study shall in all cases be met. They 
are: 

English, three units. 

Foreign Language, two units. 

Mathematics, two units. 

Science, one unit. 

History, one unit. 

Six additional units. 
In place of either two units in mathematics or two units of a for- 
eign language, a substitution may be allowed of two units, consisting 
of a second unit of history and a second unit of science. 
One unit is equivalent to ten credit hours. 

SUGGESTED ARRANGEMENT OF COURSES 



Freshman 
ENGLISH 
Algebra 
Latin 
German 

General Science 
Agriculture 



Sophomore 
ENGLISH 
Geometry 
Latin 
German 
Anc. History 
Elective 



Junior 
ENGLISH 
Alg. and Geom. 
Latin 
German 
M. and M. Hist. 
Elective 



Senior 
English 
Elective 
Latin 
German 

AMERICAN HIS. 
Physics 



Electives from Commercial or Pre- Vocational subjects. 
Subjects in capitals are required. 
Four to be selected each year. 

AGRICULTURE 

The Board of Trustees is fully awake to the necessity for a more 
general knowledge of the scientific principles underlying growing, har- 
vesting, and feeding of crops ; a more general knowledge of the prin- 
ciples of care, breeding, and feeding of live stock ; and a more definite 
knowledge of the marketing of farm products. They are of the opin- 
ion that the farm boy wishes to leave the farm because he has not been 
shown the opportunity for a vocation, a career, or service in the busi- 
ness of farming. 

MANUAL TRAINING AND DOMESTIC SCIENCE 

Two rooms of the building are devoted to the use of these sub- 
jects. The shop is amply equipped with benches, tools, and a lathe, 

10 



Mechanical Drawing will be ofTered in conjunction with, this work. 
The kitchen is adequate to meet the demands put upon it by those who 
elect to take the work as outlined by the State Course. 

BIBLE STUDY 

The study of the Bible is considered of so much importance that 
arrangements have been made by which it will be taught in the Acad- 
emy. The subject will be made an elective one. Credit will be given 
as in other studies. This will be one of the most valuable studies in 
the course, and it is hoped many will take advantage of the work. 

TYPEWRITING AND BOOKKEEPING 

Two New Underwood machines were installed the past year and 
were in such demand that, a period following school dismissal was nec- 
essary that all might complete the work. This promises to become 
one of the most practical of the courses offered. The Bookkeeping 
proved equally popular. Arrangements have been made to do three 
credits of work in each of the two subjects. 

ENGLISH 

I. English Composition. 

The aim of this course is to give the student a practical knowledge 
in the principles of English composition. Every student should be able 
to use correctly his own language, both in writing and in speaking. 
Two recitations per week are given in this study during each year of 
the Academic course. The student is required to write at least one 
short theme each week.' The theme iz then discussed by the class and 
carefully criticised by the teacher. 

1st year- Composition an 1 Grammar. 

2nd year- Composition :.:..J Rhetoric. 

3rd year— Composit ion and Rhetoric. 

4th year— Term Essays and Rhetoric. 

II. English Literature. 

The purpose of this course is to create an interest in literature for 
its own sake and to increase the culture of the student by developing 
a love for the best in thought and style. This can be done only by a 
thorough study of the masterpieces of the most important English and 
American writers. It is desired to emphasize that the reading of the 
following selections does not constitute the proper study of literature. 
The time element is important. To receive credit for a year's work 



11 



requires nine months' time under the careful supervision of an exper- 
ienced teacher. 

First Year. I, Longfellow's Poems ; Stevenson's Treasure Is- 
land ; Dickens' Christmas Carol and The Cricket on the Hearth ; one 
book in outside reading ; II, Whittier's Poems ; Shakespeare's Mer- 
chant of Venice ; Irving's Sketch Book ; one book in outside reading. 

Second Year. I, Scott's Ivanhoe ; Lady of the Lake ; Eliot's Silas 
Marner ; one book in outside reading. II, Sir Roger de Coverley Pa- 
pers ; Macaulay 's Lays of Ancient Rome ; Shakespeare's Julius Ciesar; 
Lamb's Old China and Other Essays ; Selected Poems of Coleridge and 
Campbell ; one book in outside reading. 

Third Year. J, Lowell's Poems ; Washington's Farewell Address 
and Webster's Bunker Mill Oration ; Hawthorne's Twicetold Tales; 
Poe's Tales ; one book in outside reading. II, Lincoln's Cooper Union 
Address; Macaulay's Speeches on Copyright ; Shakespeare's As You 
Like It; First View of American Literature by Moody, Lovett and 
Boynton ; one book in outside reading. 

Fourth Year. I, A Kirst View of English Literature by Moody, 
Lovett and Boynton ; Shakespeare's Hamlet and Twelfth Night; Mil- 
ton's Short Poems ; one book in outside reading. II, Burke's Concilia- 
tion ; Selections from The Golden Treasuray of Palgrave ; Tennyson's 
Poems ; Shekespeare's Macbeth ; one book in outside reading. 

HISTORY 

The course in History is now arranged to conform to the recom- 
mendations of the Committee of Seven of the American Historical 
Association. 

Besides the culture value of history, it is to be remembered that 
it is the study which furnishes the students the ideals of character 
which lead to the highest moral growth. The student should thor- 
oughly understand the institutional life of the people studied. 

The purposes of history in the Academy are as follows : 

First. The development of moral character. History as the study 
of institutional life and of character teaches us to watch the progress 
of humanity in the rise and fall of nations. Success or failure in nat- 
ional life or in the life of a person will cause us to adopt for ourselves 
and our country that which has proved of excellent worth. History 
helps us to avoid the mistakes of other people and nations. 

Second. The teaching of patriotism and the broadening of our in- 
terests and sympathies. While we wish to be familiar with our own 



government and national character, we must recognize the broad prin- 
ciples of the universal brotherhood of men. 

Third. The development of our powers of judgment. It is here 
that we especially study the relation between cause and effect. Every 
statesman has been a student of history. In studying the problems 
of life which have confronted other people we are greatly aided in the 
practical solution of the life problems of today. 

Fourth. The acquirement of useful facts. This, though gener- 
ally considered of most importance, is in fact but a subordinate pur- 
pose in the study of history. 

Fifth. The gaining of a broad and practical general culture. The 
work consists of a study of Ancient History in the second year ; a spe- 
cial study of Medieval and Modern History in the third year ; of Eng- 
lish History in the third year ; United States History and Civil Gov- 
ernment in the fourth year. 

MATHEMATICS 

The aim of this study is to introduce the student to mathematical 
methods and develop in him the power to reason clearly and accurately 
on any given problem. Algebra is studied throughout the first year of 
the high school and the first half of the third year ; Geometry during 
the second year and through the last half of the third year. A great 
deal of supplementary work is given in Algebra, and original exercises 
are introduced as much as possible in Geometry. Arithmetic is an 
elective study. 

LATIN 

There is no subject in the Academy which has greater disciplinary 
value to the pupil than the study of Latin. It trains and strengthens 
the memory, cultivates and quickens the perception, and develops hab- 
its of ready, accurate and sound thinking. 

A very large per cent, of all the words used in the dictionary are 
of Latin origin, therefore some knowledge of this subject is absolutely 
necessary for a correct understanding of our own English language. 
It gives us a key to a quicker understanding of all that we read or 
hear. It is essential to all who are to continue work in college. It is 
helpful to every professional man. It will give us a greater apprecia- 
tion of the Latin writers and speakers. It increases our general cul- 
ture and contributes to our broader discipline. 



13 



DOMESTIC SCIENCE 



Prcvociilional Studies 

In Domestic Science one year's work will be given. This will con- 
sist of the following : 

I. A study of foods and their preparation. 

II. Sewing. 

III. House Furnishing. 

IV. Laundry Work. 

V. Hygiene — study of the care of the body of diseases, etc. 

In Manual Training, there will be a study of the elements of me- 
chanical drawing and wood finishing. There will be the practical con- 
struction of various useful articles. 

The principles of Agriculture will consist of the study of Soils and 
fertility of farm and garden crops, of horticulture, dairying and hus- 
bandry. 

In all prevocational work the student will have the very best op- 
portunity of learning the practical side of the work. Each of these 
studies will be given live days in the week throughout the year. 

The Academy is supplied with sufficient apparatus to be a valuable 
aid in the study of natural sciences. In Physics the subject is illustra- 
ted by many simple pieces of apparatus, besides the air pump, electri- 
cal machine, batteries, etc. Geology and Mineralogy are illustrated 
by a collection of more than twelve hundred specimens, presented to 
the Academy by the Alumni. In Zoology and Botany, animals and 
plants are studied from nature, and systems of classifications are made 
prominent. In all the sciences objects are used as much as possible. 

The following are the purposes of science work : 

First. To interest the pupil in the observation of nature. 

Second. To develop the power of reasoning through the original 
investigation of the truths of nature. 

Third. To give a practical knowledge of the elementary principles 
of those sciences which are now, in a great measure, causing our rapid 
progress in the civilization of the world. 

MUSIC 

Both voice and piano are taught by experienced teachers and credit 
will be given for the completion of the required work.- 

I. Piano. In the Piano Course, pupils must have gained sufficient 
ability in sight-reading ami execution, to enable them to take up the 
work in the course, which is equivalent to the first year of college 

14 



work ; and shall have advanced during the year sufficiently to be able 
to appear in recital. 

The fundamental purpose in the piano course will be to supply am- 
ple training in the various types of musical literature, represented in 
the grades attained, and so to instill a love for the best in music, that 
the amateur as well as the student who wishes later to specialize in 
music, will find the work comprehensive. 

The work will be based upon 

1. Mason's System of Fundamental Technics. 

2. A knowledge of Scale Formation and Chord Construction. 

3. Studies from such noted teachers and composers as H e "er, 
Czerny, Bertini, for fluency and assurance in playing and sight-reading. 

4. Sonatas and compositions from classic and modern composers, 
and — 

5. The study of History of Music. 

No lessons trill be excused unless absince from school is necessary be- 
cause of illness, ami whkn due notice, lias been, given; such lessons are to be 
■maile up during the semester in which they incur, unless in case of protracted 
illness. 

Piano Course, one private lesson of 45 minutes per week and one 
class lesson in History and Theory in two weeks— $10. 00 per semester. 
II. Voice. In vocal music the work will consist of the following: 

1. The development of the voice through the training of the ear 
to the appreciation of perfect tones. 

2. The studies in the oratorios and songs from the masters of 
music. 

3. A study of the history and development of music having in 
view both the acquaintance and appreciation of music. 

4. A study of the nature and tendency of modern music as se- 
lected from the best of modern composers. 

5. Special chorus singing leading to some public performances. 

GENERAL ITEMS 

The government of the school is based upon the idea that manhood 
is more than scholarship; that self-respect and self-control on the 
part of a student are important factors in the formation of character. 
Greater stress is laid upon the thoroughness of instruction and accu- 
racy of knowledge than upon rapidity of advancement. 

For many years the health of students has been uniformly good. 
There is probably no better location in the State in this respect. 

The Friends and Methodists both hold religious services on the 



15 



Sabbath and each maintains a Sabbath school. Meetings of the 
Young People's Society of Christian Endeavor and the Epworth 
League are held every Sabbath evening, and students are welcome to 
their meetings and membership. 

A sufficient number of teachers is constantly employed so that 
large classes may be avoided, and students may receive personal at- 
tention. 

Expenses are as low as at any other school offering equal ad- 
vantages. 

The managers of the school are very careful to make this an in- 
stitution in which students who are away from home and its restraints 
will be surrounded by good, moral influences, and in this they have 
the co-operation of the citizens of the village. There are no beer, 
liquor or billiard saloons in the village. 

No student whose influence is known to have a corrupting tenden- 
cy, will be retained in the school. 

DIPLOMAS 

Students whose conduct is exemplary, and who complete the 
course of study, will be furnished a diploma, signed by the instructors 
and the 'President and Secretary of the Board of Trustees. To receive 
a diploma a pupil should be in attendance at the Academy one year, 
except when special arrangements are made with the Superintendent 
and Board of Trustees. 

LECTURES 

Students have the opportunity to hear good lectures at small ex- 
pense. Addresses 0:1 various subjects are given during the year. 

LITERARY EXERCISES 

Literary exercises may be required of all students in all grades, 
both in class work and before the public Care is used that students 
may learn the art of composition and public delivary. Essays and 
declamations are a part of the regular school work in the department 
of oratorv. 

LIBRARIES 

Five sets of encyclopedias are in the school rooms, and these, 
with the dictionaries and numerous reference books, are for the free 
use of all. There is a large library in connection with the school, 
which comprises about three thousand volumes. 

The texts adopted by the State Board of Education are used in 
the Academy. 



EXPENSES 



KATES OF TUITION 

Students who enter at irregular times will be charged full tuition 
for the term in case they complete the term's work in such manner as 
to receive credit toward the diploma. 

Special students and others who do not expect to earn credit in 
the regular course will be charged only for the time of actual enroll- 
ment in the classes. 

Occasionally those who are particularly strong are permitted to earn 
credits by outside study under the supervision of the teachers. For 
such credits as these one-half the regular tuition will be charged. 

Tuition is due at the opening of each term, and settlement should 
be made with the Superintendent or the Treasurer of the Hoard of 
Trustees. Students will receive no credit for their work until the 
tuition is paid. 

HOARDING 

The citizens of Spiceland have always given the students a hearty 
welcome by receiving them into their homes. The cost of boarding 
and rooms in private families where everything is furnished can be 
had for $.1.00 to $4. 00 a week. 

Persons who may live near enough to go home at the end of the 
week, and who wish to economize, may reduce the cost of living to a 
very small sum. 

LIST OF STUDEN TS 
SENIORS 

Butler, Mary Carter, Kathleen 

Copeland, Vernon Essington, Cash 

Ewing, llollis Cannaway, Caroline 

Gannaway, Hugh Hinshaw, Howard 

Kimbrel, Olen McFarland, Ralph 

McNew, Mildred Pate, Grace 

Poarch, Damon Poer, Emma 

Katliff, Hazel Pike, Myron 

JUNIORS 

Addison, Edna Boyd, Beatrice 

Brenneman, Veda Chandler, Gertrude 

Copeland, Raymond Edwards, Marbel 

Grau, Robert Grillin, Price 

Harrold, Glenna Henshaw, Clinton 

17 



Hinshaw Robert Jackson, Opal 

Kirk, Park McNew, Arland 

Painter, Edna Pennington, Leslie 

Pickering, Pauline Pierson, Ruth 

SOPHOMORES 

Deem, Dorothy 
Holloway, Evelyn 
McNew, Earl 
Millikan, Levara 
Templeton, Maurine 

FRF.SHMKN 



Brewer, Helen ( Carr, Wilbur 

Catt, Emogcan Catt, Pauline 

Chew, Donald Cluggish, Orville 

Coffin, Mary Griffin, Louise 

Holloway, George Leigh, Ralph 

Noah, Faye Pate, Pearl 

Peirce, Glenn Peiree, Julia 

Peirson, Roger Poor, Elmer 

Poer, Lucile Reece, Violet 

Rife, Margaret Stafford, Lowell 

True, Ralph Coflin, Otis 

LIST OF ACADEMY SUPERINTENDENTS 

Oliver Bales 1859-1803 William P. Pinkham 1884-1885 

Clarkson Davis 1863-1867 Thomas Newlin 1885-1892 

Edward Taylor 1867-1868 J.Frank Brown 1892 1893 

Clarkson Davis 1S08-1874 Arthur W. Jones 1893-1894 

Timothy Wilson 1874-1876 George W. Neet 1894-1898 

Clarkson Davis 1876-1882 Murray S. Wildman 1898-1901 

Thomas Newlin 1882-1883 M. S. Woods 1901-1903 



Homer If. Cooper 1903-1916 



Black, Nellie 
Coffin, William 
McNew, Donald 
Mayse, George 
Wilson, Carrie 



IS 



ALUMNI 

OFFICERS FOR THE YF. AR 1917-1918 

President Clarence Painter 

Vice-President Lillian Hayes 

Secretary Ruth Harvey 

Treasurer Myron Painter 

Orator Everet Pennington 

Vice-Orator ... Clarence Cartwright 

Historian _ Benice Hinshaw 

Vice-Historian Mary Antim Wilson 

I Gertrude Seaford 
Executive Committee ' r rene picketing 

( Nellie True 

Those marked (*) are deceased. 

1870 *Eli U. Cook 

John J. Stubbs . Omaha, Neb 

1871 *Walter D. Jones 

*Alvin H. Jenkins ... 

*1. Macy Good 

C. R. Dixon ... ... Paonia, Col 

R. G. Boone Berkeley, Cal 

Dallas Sisson Spiceland 

Mary Ballenger-Barnard New Castle 

Louisa Wio' ■ rsham Spiceland 

Lida Edwards-Saint ... Newcastle 

1872 Lindley H. Johnson Dunreith 

*David Henley..... 

*Jacob Hill. 

Henry W. Painter New Castle, R F D 1 

Robert G. Mitchell ... Pacific Grove, Cal 

1873 *Sadie D. Talbert- Wright 

Aaron B. Bell Springtown, Ark 

*J. Tilmari Hutching 

John Pennington Damascus, O 

19 



Mary Stubbs-Painter New Castle, RFD1 

Nathan Williams Omaja, Cuba 

S. Carrie Talbert-Newby Wichita, Kan 

1874 Alice Coffin-Russell New York City 

Alvira Spencer-Harold Indianapolis 

J. P. Edwards Spiceland 

William S. MofFett Kennard 

Edwin 0. Kennard Pasadena, Cal 

Nathan Rosenberger Muscatine, Iowa 

*W. E. Jackson 

D. C. Mitchell Spiceland 

1875 W. W. Gregg ... Indianapolis 

William Pidgeon ( Bloomington 

Irvin Stanley . Westfield 

1S77 Milton Roberts Linnville, Iowa 

1878 S. Ella Bogue-Dogget Danville, Va 

Belle Chambers-Bailey Richmond 

J. Pinkhey Mitchell Seattle, Wash 

Thomas Mitchell Olin, N C 

Flora Moore-Bailey ... __. Lincoln ville 

♦John 0. Reed 

♦William Seaford 

Fannie Thornburg-Parsons Oak Park, 111 

1879 J. A. Buck Terre Haute 

Carrie Goodwin-Jeffrey New Castle 

Thomas Newlin Greensboro, N C 

1880 .1. Edgar Cloud. San Diego, Cal 

William N. Lamb..... San Francisco, Cal 

Mattie LambOutland Amboy 

Ada Grace Murphy Chattanooga, Tenn 

Ida May Roberts Bolder, Col 

Emma Belle Roberts Bolder, Col 

Frank Symons Portland, Maine 

Lainira Trueblood-Kellum ..Camby, Ind 

1881 Oscar R. Baker Winchester 

*Corrie Bogue 

Minnie Ronedict-Blankenship Paragon 

Carrie Unthank-Kellum Indianapolis 

♦Jessie Stratton -. .... — 



20 



1882 ♦Arthur H. Baily 

J. Newton Barnard ... Daleville 

Harriet Bogue-Newlin . . . Indianapolis 

Harriet E. Dickinson ..... Spiceland 

Charles Newlin Indianapolis 

1883 Anna Iluddelson-Foster Washington, D C 

Ryland Ratlilf ... .. Danville 

Julia Stattord-Newby... New Castle R F D 2 
Emily Weeks Middletown R F D 1 

1884 *Cora Kirk 

Ella Stratton- Hodson . New Castle R F D 10 

Virginia Gtillin-Cory Dunreith 

Isadure Hall-Wilson ....... . . Spiceland 

William Julian ... Hastings, Neb 

Charles Newby Converse 

1885 Mary L. Brown-Pennington. . Spiceland 

Alfred Y. King .. ... Mt. Vernon, 111 

Oliver C. Steele Spiceland 

1886 L. Winnie Baily-Clement Haddondeld, N J 

Mattie E. Brown Daytonia, Fla 

Richard Broadbent Elwood 

Elbert Griffin Elwood 

AlonzoC. Hodson New Castle, R F D 10 

♦John L. McNew 

Russell Ratliff Marion 

1887 Herbert T . Baily Spiceland 

Clarence H. Beard Indianapolis 

Anna K. Bogue-Shaffer.. Benton Harbor, Mich 

Lindley Con. t . con Tomah, Wis 

Elizabeth S. Hiatt-Geneau Omaha, Neb 

Abraham L. Miller Birmingham, Ala 

Bert Smith Zionsville 

1888 Rhoda Ballenger-Cunningham ..Indianapolis J 

♦Hannah Brown-Stribbing . / 

Orynthis Brown-Jester ... Payton, Iowa 

*Jessie Butler 

Clara G. Edwards-Knignt St. Louis, Mo 

John C. Cook ........ New Castle 

Eva Elliott-Compton .. Tomah, Wis 

21 



Achsah E. Ratcliff-Ratliff Richmond 

Harmon H. Rayle Muncie 

Charles Stubbs Frankfort 

J. A. Greenstreet New Castle 

H. H. Ratcliff Connersville 

1889 Laura Benedict. . -..Indianapolis 

Blanch Braddock-McNew Greenfield 

Frank Copeland Dunreith 

Estella Deem-Kennedy Greensburg 

'Lawrence Gardner 

Gertrude Gordon-Geneaux Victoria, Texas 

Sue Griffin-Evans .. Spiceland 

Otis Stubbs . New Lisbon 

May White Pasadena, Cal 

1800 L. Etta Butler Lewisville, R F D 

Elmer Deem. Frankfort 

Edwin B. Ratcliff Spiceland 

Bennie Stratton New Castle, R F Dl 

S. E. Stubbs Wilkinson 

1891 Ethel E. Copeland-Lee Meadeville, Fa 

Louie Edmundson-Poe Indianapolis 

Maurine Gardner-Kern Cadiz 

Charles N. Hardy Markleville 

Alice Hiatt-Copeland Cincinnati, 

Ernest Sisson Greenfield 

Alfred Symons Supai, Ariz 

Mary M. Teas-Parker.. . Eaton, 

Charles Titus. Waiuington 

Herbert D. Woodard ..Chicago, 111 

1892 \Jcsse S. Baily 

Clara Brown. . Spiceland 

Warren T. Evans '. Canby, Minn 

John B. Greenstreet Lewisville, R F I) 

Winnie Hinshaw-Milligan Winchester 

Uavid M. Kemp Kempton 

Alice Lawrence Spiceland 

Estella Symons Minneapolis, Minn 

Alvin Ulrich Greensboro 

1893 Oscar Bogue Spiceland 

Estella Charles-Fawcett Indianapolis 



22 



Floy Hill.. Pasadena, Cal 

Arthur Holloway ... Spiceland 

Leora Jessup-Parker . .. Scot City, Kan 

John Miller _. ... New Castle 

*01en Payne .... .-. . 

Lena Rayle-Smith Spichland 

George H. Smith . New Castle 

Orville White .. Joplin, Mo 

1894 Minnie Black-Moore Chicago, 111 

Bessie I. Brown-Stone ...Daytonia, Fla 

Clarence V. Hall New Castle 

Horace Hardy Markleville 

Ida Holloway-Kenworthy Cambridge, Mass 

Arlie Hood . Omaha, Neb 

Bertha Jessup .. ..Clay Cente.i, Neb 

Elma Lawrence ... . Spiceland 

Maude M. Shatfer-Byrket New Castle 

Frank Pitts ._ Evansville 

Oscar F. Symons Minnehpolis, Minn 

1895 Clarence Painter New Castle 

Mabel Wright-Gaar ... Cambridge City 

Edgar Cox Clarkson, N C 

*Nellie Ratliff 

Howard Henley Tuttle, Okla 

Maud Wildman-Evans Philadelphia, Pa 

Frank Hudelson . .. Mays 

* Pearl Moffett- Wood .. . 

1K9(! Cora Hudson.- Hogue. .. Spiceland 

Clara Whit'-- Wildman.. Selina, 

Elsie Hud( ,.,on-IIolland Brooklyn, N Y 

'• Anna Morris-Wilson _. ....... South Wabash 

Pearl M. James-Tweedy Wabash 

Mabel Newby-Hood Omaha, Neb 

V W. J. Carson San Francisco, Cal 

Nora Griffin-Beach ...Richmond 

! Theresa Wildman Philadelphia, Pa 

: Roscoe Edwards . New Castle 

1897 '■ Leoti Applegate-Coffin.. . _. Spiceland 

: - Elva M. Hudson-Hall Spiceland 

Lois M. Henley Indianapolis 



■2\\ 



*Fannie Hayes 

Floy Hudelson ._ Greenfield 

Josie B. Harland-Weatherman Dana 

Jessie Leakey-Hiatt New Lisbon 

• Pearl Millikan-IIardy Markleville 

- Ethel Rifner-Newby . Englewood, Kan 

Mayme Stafford-Applegate ... Spiceland 

" Clyde Sisson-Moore . Indianapolis 

Minnie Stall'ord-Stratton ..New Castle, R FD 

Charles H. Smith Philadelphia, Pa 

'Irving White 

1898 Clifford Applegate Spiceland 

J ames Holtsclaw L Spiceland 

*Bavis Nay ... 

Emory ItatclifT.... Whittier, Cal 

Gertrude Seaford - Spiceland 

•- ** Pearl Symons-Rifner Spiceland 

- Lelia Smith-Rice Spiceland 

Charles A. Hoard.... New Yorlc City 

Merritt Stafford : — — Carthage 

,. Core Smith-Sparks Sumrnitville 

Waller Painter . Crown Point 

t Bertha Charles-Hewitt Harlem, Mont 

- Ernest Shockley Angola 

.' Elsie Shockley-Lockridge Shawnee, Okla 

1899 . Bessie I Iaisley Alvin, Texas 

Bertha Lawrcnoe-MeCraeen . . Holgan, Cuba 

Florence Macy-Parker Carthage 

Earl Motfett . Knightstown, R V 1) 2 

Walter T. Pearce Rushville 

• Orabell Shaffer-Bell New Castle, R F 1) 2 

1900 Ethel Applegate-Paintcr Spiceland 

Edgar l!a/./le St. Paul, Minn 

Susan Benedict-Nay - Springport 

*Cora Charles-Carson 

ConnieGriflin Knightstown 

/ David W. Cordon Chicago 

1 Guy II. Hall ..New Lisbon 

►Clyde Kennedy -- Berkeley, Cal 

/ Clarence Macy ..- Scott City, Kan 

24 



v Everett Macy ... -Scott City, Kan 

Carroll Mills . Kirksville, Mo 

Cecil Newby . . Englewood, Kan 

*Jeanette Rifner . 

Pernia Thorn burg-Griffin Atwood, Col 

John R. Thompson . . . New Castle 

lf)01 1 Ira E. Hell New Castle, R F D 2 

Bertha Butler-Ballard.. Lewisville 

Raymond Byrket. . Lewisville 

Jennie Compton-Cope Dunreith 

1 Everette Cope .. Dunreith 

-Deborah Edwards ... ... Knightstown, R F D 

Ethel Edwards-Kramein . Bloomington, 111 

"Lillian II. Hayes .... .....Dunreith 

Walter B. Harvey ... Pittsburg, I'a 

John R. Ilinshaw . New Castle 

Everest Macy Scott City, Kan 

"'Georgia Millikan-Hardy Pendleton 

Jennie E. Millikan- Wright. . . Edinburg 

'- Homer Nugen ... ..Lewisville 

Cora E. Risk-Deem . . . Spiceland 

<■ Robert A. Roberts . ... New Albany 

1 Grace E. Stewart-Johnson Greenfield 

. Russell L. Wright New Castle 

Walter C. Wright Pasadena, Cal 

1902 Hatley Anderson . . Spiceland 

Jessie Baily-Piorce Knightstown 

Mary Butler New Castle, R F I) 1 

Waller Byers Knightstown, R F D 1 

Jennie Kirk ..'err ...... Brookville 

l/Guerhey Maple . Whittier, Cal 

Manning Smith Philadelphia, Pa 

v liena Thomas ... . Fountain City 

Retla Thomas Fountain City 

" Russell Wilson ... Palo Alto, Cal 

India Yost-Cook Sulphur Springs 

1.903 Itilla Bartlott-IIarvey Pittsburg, Pa 

Nellie Beckett _ Whittier, Cal 

■ Perrin Holt .. . New Castle 

\ Arthur Johnson . Lewisville 



25 



i 



Carl Newby ; '..Mulhall, Okla 

• Rupert Redic ___E1 Paso, Tex 

I Ralph Stubbs... .. .Spiceland 

L -Walter Wright Edinburg 

1904 *Elsie Bell-Applegate 

Josephine Beeson-Niles Connersville 

. Will Benedict Los Angeles, Cal 

v Lawrence Bridges Greenfield 

Warren Edwards Lewisville 

Irl Evans.. .. Mt. Summit 

' Jessie Gordon-Newby Richmond 

Ruth Harvey Dunreith 

" Hazel Heacock-Yockey Spiceland 

■-Homer Henley -- Salina, Kan 

Claire Hoover-May Indianapolis 

Barton Jones South Bend 

Belva Jordan-Coffin New Castle, RFU1 

■ Guy May. ... Indianapolis 

Pansy Newby Lewisville 

Anna Painter. _ New Castle, R F 1) 1 

Clara Patterson-Rothrock. New Castle, R F D 1 
Lois Pitts Morristown, R F D 

- Wendell Pitts Morristown, R FD 

- Lawrence Reeves -. Knightstown 

Robert Reeves Wilkinson 

■ Etta Rifner-Parker Indianapolis 

John Rogers Mooreland 

•Herbert Seaford 

Ralph Silver San Francisco, Cal 

Bernetha Smith Muncie 

v Charles Veach ._ Mt. Summit 

Ethel Wright-Hershaur Rushville 

Harold Yockey Oklahoma City, Okla 

1905 Elsie Anderson-Conwell Mooreland 

Walter Brandy Washington, Pa 

. Raymond Duke Indianapolis 

Alexander Gano Indianapolis 

v Oran Griffin — Indianapolis 

i Ruth Gardner New Castle, R F D 1 

. Elva Kennard-Mueller .. ..New Castle 

2<1 



Aura Lane-Lee. Lewisville 

- Edward Pope . . New Castle, R F D 6 

• Jessie Reece . Long Beach, Cal 

• Ruby Reeves Knightstown 

Anna Reeves . .. Wilkinson, R FD 1 

* Arthur Rifner. 

- Arden Stubbs _. . Spiceland 

■ Everette Test Los Angeles, Cal 

' Amy Thomas-Sherry ...... Willow Branch 

Paul Wilson. New Castle 

190b" "Charles Bundy _. Muncie 

Walter Bundy Basil, Switzerland 

1 Arthur Hudelson . ... Connersville 
Hazel Hudelson ... . Dunreith 

♦Edna Kellar 

Francis Nugen Hagerstown 

Myron Painter .. — Spiceland 

Edgar Rogers Mooreland 

' Otis Shaffer ... Richmond 

Maude Simmons-Bolih ... Zanesville, 

Grover VanDine . _ Shirley 

Orville Wright New Castle, R F D 

1907 Hazel Bartlett Lewisville 

i Irene Bell- Wright. ... . Whittier, Cal 

■ Bertha Bowers-Rogers ... Mooreland 

Ruby McDaniel-Retherford New Castle, R F D 

• Levinus Painter ,, Poplar, Ridge, N Y 

Howard Seaford Spiceland 

v Clenna Smith- Molfitt Lewisville 

Hassel Willia.na ..Muncie 

1908 Hersehel Alf Lewisville 

• Clara Burcham-Hinshaw New Castle 

Ethel Chandler-Swindell. .. Greensboro 

■ Loma Delon .. Spiceland 

• Margaret Harden-Painter . Poplar Ridge, N Y 
i Ruby Julian-Reece . . Washington, D C 

• Everette Kennard Knightstown, R F D 

v Glerin Kirkham Rushville, R F D 9 

Paul McDaniel . Knghtstown, R F D :i 
Vida Redic Clouderoft, N M 



27 



Hazel Reese-Clampett ... Greensboro 

Bessie Sidwell St. Clairsville, 

Mary Seaford-Alf Indianapolis 

■ Edna Swindell Greensboro 

Lucile Wilson Pasadena, Cal 

1909 Beulah Arnold New Castle, R F D G 

Loren Butler. Spiceland 

\ Marie Clarke-Little... Springfield 

* Walter Hays Markleville 

Ruth Hudelson-Gold ....New Castle, U F I) 10 

Ethel Jackson-Clayton Straughn 

>' Ada Jarrett-IIinshaw . . . . ... Kennard 

" Lucile Mcllvaine .. . Lewisville 

v James McGrady ' New Castle 

(Griffin Moffitt Knightstown, R FD 

v Alma Osborn. Winchester, R F D 

Eigar Pennington ..Hartford, Conn 

Hoyt Reese Whittier, Cal 

' Hazel Skaates-Hance Newman 

'■ Minnie Simmons Staley Knightstown 

Margaret Smith Spiceland 

Clayton Teeter Mooreland 

1 Ross Williams ... Richmond 

Perry Wilson New Castle 

1910 <• Mary Antrim- Wilson Spiceland 

Helen Bartlett-Pottenger Indianapolis 

Clarence Cartwright --- . Lewisville 

Nettie Grissom-Allen . New Castle 

^ Marie Hendricks — Straughn 

^ Bernice Henshaw Dunreith 

Mary Jessup-Smith Spiceland 

. Minnie Kiser-Boyd New Castle 

v Andrew Markle Middletown 

Ruth May . - Straughn 

Ruth Moflett - -- Richmond 

Clarence Rich Mays, R F 1) 25 

Hazel Seaford-Winan Eaton, () 

Lena Shivoly-Tcst New Castle, R F I) 

>• William Smith Spiceland 

* Edith Stigleman-Mollitt.. Knightstown, R F I) 



1 Leanna Taylor-McNew . . Knightstown,. R F D 

Ralph Test ... ... New Castle, R F D 1 

' Kerney Wilson ..Spiceland 

1911 1 Roy Brown Spiceland 

V Howard Caldwell Indianapolis 

v Hazel Cochran-Lane ... . . Spiceland 

• Ruba Cochran-Symons Lewisville 

v Ralph Evans Spiceland 

, Decil Fields- Woollam ... ... Spiceland 

• Ruth A. Harvey ... Spiceland 

- Howard Harvey ... . New Castle 

Clarence Holl'man Spiceland 

1 Myra Hunnicutt-Beard Economy 

Margaret Hunnicutt-Stuart. Hagerstown 

' Grace Myers-Hoover New Castle, R F D 

. Myra Painter-Rayle ... . .. . Spiceland 

' Everett Pennington Spiceland 

1 Erma Pierson-Smullen ..Lewisville 

\ Rex Potterf Lewisville 

\ Merwin Svmons ... Lewisville 

• Ernestine Williams-Millikan . New Castle 

1912 Sadie 1! aeon . ..Mt. Summit 

! Dorothy Bell .. Spiceland 

• Ralph Chandler —. . Spiceland 

! Edith Chew-Moffitt .Knightstown 

1 Ruth Conner.. ..Lewisville 

I Gertrude DeWitte Straughn 

'• Russell Ewing ... Knightstown 

1 Raul Fletcher Lewisville 

v Alvin Hardin Knightstown 

v Martha Hayes-Hicks _ Markleville 

Melissa Lane Spiceland 

Mabel Macy-Hardin Spiceland 

• Exie Moll'ett Richmond 

v Clara Montgomery-Bradway New Castle 

Norma Rierson .. Lewisville 

Rachel Test-Fletcher Lewisville 

Margaret Toohey . Spiceland 

• Audrey West-Hays Markleville 

191!! Mabel R.uck-Symons ... ..Spiceland 

29 



; Addie Butler New Castle, R F D 

. Marie Bundy .Spiceland 

. Olive DeWitte Straughn 

Jessie Draper-Pidgeon Spiceland 

Anna Evans Spiceland 

.' Iris Hall _ Hagerstown 

y Georgia Hodson-Wilson Knightstown 

Floss Kiser , Dunreith 

Mildred Mercer Spiceland 

Hazel Moflitt-Price Knightstown 

Lenora Pickett- Lord Dunreith 

* Lydia Sellers. . Spiceland 

'Raymond Stubbs 

i Zola Waddell J Dunreith 

Ercel Wilson-Richey Kokomo 

1914 Marie Black . New Castle 

Harold Brown Straughn 

Helen Daugherty --Treaty 

Cortez Ewing .Knightstown 

Pauline Haisley-Jackson Morristown 

Fred Hardin - Knightstown, R F D 2 

Carl Jarrett - Spiceland 

Lowell Jefferies New Castle, R F D 2 

Irene McDaniel Markleville 

Albert Mcllvaine . Lewisville 

Marie Modlin ..Marion 

, Agnes Pennington Spiceland 

Vivian Pickering... Spiceland 

Clyde Rogers Dunreith 

Maurine Shepherd ..New Castle 

1 Mary Swain Greensboro 

Norman Woodward ..New Castle, R F D 

1915 \ Frank Delon . -. Greensboro 

Doris Evans ._ Spiceland 

Wannetta Hall-Stahr. ... Hagerstown 

Louise Hill.. ... Spiceland 

. Irene Pickering.. - Spiceland 

i Adrain Pr itt St. Paul 

Paul Recce Knightstown 

Mildred Stewart-Hardin Knightstown 

Leslie Trobaugh Dunreith 



30 



1916 Earl Antrim Spiceland 

1 Venton Brenneman Spiceland 

v Ruby Brewer Spiceland 

Claude Deem Dunreith 

Royden Gorden ..Spiceland 

Ezra Hill Spiceland 

Ruth Holloway Spiceland 

Hazel Holloway.. Spiceland 

Marie Hoffman Spiceland 

Menia.lay .. Greensboro 

Marion Jeffries . New Castle 

; Clyde Mercer Spiceland 

Irene Pennington Spiceland 

■ Edward Poer Spiceland 

Ruth Ratliff Spiceland 

Arnold Templeton Greensboro 

Mark Thomas .. Spiceland 

• Nellie True Spiceland 



Knlglitstown Kanncr Print 



1919-1920 

SPICELAND ACADEMY 

SPICELAND, INDIANA 



FACULTY AND CALENDAR 




For Hie Academic Year 1919-1920 



INSTRUCTORS 



CHESTER L. REAGAN, Principal 
B. S. Earlham, Graduate Work, Wisconsin 

EDITH E. WILDMAN 
A. B. Earlham, Graduate Work Bryn Mawr 

•CLARA B. KENDALL 
A. B. Earlham, Graduate Work Chicago 

RUSSELL RATCLIFF 

A. B. Earlham 

E. LEE OUTLAND 

B. S. Earlham 

KATHERINE SCANLAND 
Miami University 

ROY H. WOLLAM 
McCormack Seminary 



School year begins September 8 
Thanksgiving Day, November 27 
Christmas vacation begins December 19 
Christmas vacation ends December 29 
First semester ends January 16 
Second semester begins January 19 
Commencement, Friday, May 21 




CALENDAR 



BOARD OF TRUSTEES 



Jamea Holtsclaw, President 

L. T. Pennington, Secretary and Treasurer 

Clarence Painter 

William Smith 

Morris Coffin 

Harmon H. Rayle 



INSTRUCTORS 



Academic Year 1918-1919 

CHESTER L. REAGAN, A. B. Earlham, Wisconsin 
Principal Mathematics 

EDITH E. WILDMAN, A,, B. Earlham, Bryn Mawr 
English 

IRWIN SIIULTZ, A. B. Earlham 
History and Science 

CLARA B. KENDALL, A. B. Earlham, Chicago 
Language and Domestic Science 

KATIIER1NE SCANLAND, Miami 
Music 



ROY II. WOLLAM, McCormuck Seminary, Chicago 
Bible 



Spiceland Academy 




GENERAL INFORMATION 

Spiceland Academy is the oldest academy in charge of Friends 
in Indiana. It began about 182(i as a neighborhood school, taught 
in a one-room pole cabin. In (lie following year, a "round log" 
house was built on the plot of ground which is the present site of 
the academy. Later the management of the school came into the 
hands of a committee appointed by the local meeting which has had 
control since 1833, either through a committee or a board of trustees. 

In INTO, the school was chartered as an academy and came to 
be an educational center of more than local reputation. Because 
of the reputation of the excellence of its work, the genial and ele- 
vating, as well as restraining influences of moral and religious en- 
vironment, it attracted numbers of pupils from other localities. 

The first class graduated in 1870. The Alumni Association now 
enrolls more than five hundred, and some four or five hundred 
pupils have received instruction in the school since its organization 
as an academy. 

Although the academy is under the control of a board of trustees 
appointed by Spiceland monthly meeting of Friends, it is not sec- 
tarian. If has been kept under strong Christian influences, and 
Its purpose is to foster an atmosphere of culture and refinement 
and to develop practical* earnest and active Christian manhood and 
womanhood. 

Spiceland Academy is located in the beautiful town of Spiceland, 
Indiana, In the southern part of Henry county, on the Lake Erie and 
Western railroad, two miles north of Dunreith on the Pennsylvania 
railroad. The tnterurban ear line gives connection with surrounding 
cities. 



The academy is situated in the midst of a beautiful campus, well 
kept and well adapted to athletic sports. The main building is a 
new modern brick structure, well heated, well lighted and well venti- 
lated. It has ten commodious rooms all devoted to High School 
purposes. The sanitary water supply system is used. The library 
contains four thousand seven hundred twenty-five volumes. These 
include books of general reference, such as encyclopedias, diction- 
aries, and manuals; works of standard authors in history, biography, 
religious literature, classic fiction, and poetry. The reading table 
supplied with excellent magazines. 

Adjoining the main building is the gympasium — a large buliding 
adapted for indoor athletics or for an auditorium for public gather- 
ings. 

Students may enter at any time, but students coming from other 
schools are required lo bring certificates stating their literary and 
moral standing, in the absence of approved certificate, examinations 
will be held and students classified accordingly. The conditions 
for admission to the First Year Class are the same as for entrance 
to the public High Schools of this State. In general, a graduate 
from non-commissioned High Schools of this county may enter the 
academy with credit for the number of months' work he has studied 
in his home school wherein the work is up to the standard of the 
commissioned High School. 

The academy course of study conforms to the requirements of 
the State Board of Education. In addition many elective subjects 
are offered, and thus a student may prepare for any college or more 
thoroughly equip himself for his life's work. The course of study 
has been arranged with two purposes in view: 

First — It is prepared to conform to the needs and desires of all 
stiuhnts who may not have the opportunity to pursue a college 
course, hut who desire a practical education which will prepare them 
to lead an active and a successful life. 

Second — It is arranged to enable students to make the necessary 
preparation for admission into college. The State ISoanl of Educa- 
tion has given the academy a certificate of equivalency. This 
enables tin; graduates to enter any college in the State without an 
examination. 

The academy is prepared to offer the following courses: 
English— The four years' of work as outlined by the State. In 
addition lo this, opportunity is given for work in public speaking. 

6 



Foreign Language — Four years' work may be done in Latin and 
two years' work in French. 

History — European and American. 

Mathematics — Algebra, Plane Geometry, Solid Geometry. 
Science — General Science, Physical Geography, Botany, Physics. 
Commercial Subjects — Typewriting and Arithmetic. 
Pre-Vocational Subjects — Agriculture, Manual Ttraining, Domestic 
Science. 

Additional Elective Subjects — Music, Bible, Mechanical Drawing, 
Trigonometry. 

CURRICULUM REQUIREMENTS 

I. Two majors of thirty hours each as follows: 

(a) Thirty hours in English. 

(b) Thirty hours in some one study group, 1-6. 

II. Two minors of twenty hours each in any two of the re- 
maining groups, 1-(J. 

III. Ten hours in American History and Government 

(Note). Provided, if a major is in group 2, American His- 
tory and Government may be counted toward completing 
the major. 

IV. IVlusic as given in Assembly. 
Study groups are as follows: 

L. Foreign Language. 

2. History. 

3. Mathematics. ' ■ 

4. Science. 

5. Commercial Subjects. 

G. Pre-Vocational Subjects. 

Students who expect to go to college are advised to take 130 
credit hours of work in English and in groups 1-4. 

A credit hour is a study carried satisfactorily throughout a 
.semester one day each week. 

The requirements for graduation from commissioned High Schools 
as given in the uniform course of study shall in nil cases be met. 
They are: 

English, three units. 

Foreign Language, two units. 

Mathematics, two units. 

7 



Science, at least one unit. If general science is taken, another 
year of science in a special field Is required. 
History, one unit. 
Six additional units. 

One unit is equivalent to ten credit hours. 



SUGGESTED ARRANGEMENT OF COURSES 



Freshman 
English 
Algebra 
Latin 
General 



Junior Senior 
English English 
Alg. and Geom. Elective 
Latin Latin 
French French 
M. and M. Hist. American Hist. 
Elective Physics 
Agriculture 

Electives from Commercial or Pre-Vocational subjects. 
Four to be selected each year. 



Sophomore 
English 
Geometry 
Latin 

Science Anc. History 
Elective 



ENGLISH 

I. English Composition. 

The aim of this course is to give the student, a practical knowl- 
edge of the principles of English composition. Every student should 
be able to use correctly his own language, both In writing and in 
speaking. Two recitations per week are given in this study during 
each year of the academic course. The student is required to write 
at least one short theme each week. The theme is then discussed 
by the class and carefully criticised by the teacher. 

1st year — Composition and Grammar. 

2nd year — Composition and Rhetoric. 

3rd year— Composition and Rhetoric. 

4th year — Composition and Rhetoric. 

II, English Literature. 

The purpose Of this course is to create an interest in literature 
for its own sake and to increase the culture of the student, by de- 
veloping a love for the best in thought and style. This can be done 
only by a thorough study of (he masterpieces of the most important 
English and American writers. It is desired to emphasize thai tire' 
reading of the following selections does not constitute the proper 
study of literature. The time element is important. To receive 

8 



credit for a year's work requires nine months' time under the care- 
ful supervision of an experienced teacher. 

First Year. I, Longfellow's Poems; Stevenson's Treasure Island; 
Dickens' Christmas Carol; one book in outside reading. II, Scott's 
Marmion; Burroughs' Birds and Bees; Parkman's The Oregon Trail; 
one book in outside study. 

Second Year. I, Homer's Odyssey; Macauley's Lays of Ancient 
Rome; Shakespeare's As You Like It; one book in outside reading. 
II, Scott's Ivanhoe; Hawthorne's Twice Told Tales; Eliot's Silas 
Maimer; one book in outside reading. 

Third Year. I, Heydrick's Types of the Short Story; Irving's 
Sketch Book; Burns' Cotter's Saturday Night ; one book in outside 
reading. II, Goldsmith's Deserted Village; Dickens' Tale of Two 
Cities; Tennyson's Idylls of the King; one book in outside reading; 
Long's American Literature. 

Fourth Year. I, Franklin's Autobiography; Emerson's Essays on 
Compensation and Self-Reliance; Lincoln's Speeches and Addresses; 
one book in outside reading. 11, Shakespear's .Macbeth; Lowell's 
Present Crisis; Gauss' Democracy Today; one book in outside read- 
ing; Metcalf's English Literature. 

HISTORY 

The course in History has been arranged to conform to the recom- 
mendations of the Committee of Seven of the American Historical 
Association. 

Besides the culture value of history, it is to be remembered that 
it is the study which furnishes the student the ideals of character 
which lead to (lie highest moral growth. The student should 
thoroughly understand the institutional life of the people studied. 

The purpose of History in the academy is as follows: 

First. The development of moral character. History as the 
study of institutional life and of character teaches us to watch the 
progress of humanity in the rise and fall of nations. Success or 
failure in national life or in the life of a person will cause us to 
adopt lor ourselves and our country that which has proved of ex- 
cellent worth. History helps us to avoid the mistakes of other 
people and nations. 

Second. The teaching of patriotism and the broadening of our 
interests and sympathies. While we wish to be familiar with our own 

9 



government and national character, we must recognize the broad 
principles of the universal brotherhood of men. 

Thrd. The development of our powers of judgment. It Is 
here that we especially study the relation of cause and effect. Every 
statesman has been a student of history. In studying the problems 
of life which have confronted other people, we are greatly aided in 
the practical solution of the life problems of today. 

Fourth. The acquirement of useful facts. This, though gener- 
ally considered of most importance, is, in fact, but a subordinate 
purpose in the study of history. 

Fifth. The gaining of a broad and practical general culture. 

Second Year — Early European History. 

Third Year — History of Modern Europe. 

Fourth Year — American History and Civics. 

MATHEMATICS 

The aim of this study is to introduce the student to mathematical 
methods and develop in him the power to reason clearly and ac- 
curately on any given problem. 

First Year — Algebra. 

Second Year — Plane Geometry. 

Third Year — I, Advanced Algebra; II, Solid Geometry. 

A great (leal of supplementary work Is given in Algebra, and 
original exercises are introduced as much as possible in Geometry. 
Arithmetic is an elective study. 

LATIN 

There is no subject in the academy which has greater disciplinary 
value to the pupil than the study of Latin. It trains and strength- 
ens the memory, cultivates and quickens the perception, and iter 
velops habits oil ready, accurate and sound thinking. 

A large per cent of all the words in the dictionary are of 
Latin origin, therefore sonic knowledge of this subject is absolutely 
necessary lor a correct understanding of all that we read or hear. 
It is essential to all who are lo continue work In college. It is 
helpful to every professional man. It will give us a greater ap- 
preciation of the Latin writers and speakers. It increases our 
general culture and contributes lo our broader discipline. 

First Year— Beginning Latin. 

10 



Second Year — Caesar's Gallic War. 

Third Year — Cicero's Orations and Letters. 

Fourth Year — Vergil's JEneid. 

FRENCH 

The aim of this course is to prepare the pupil to read French 
easily; to understand simple spoken French, and to speak and 
write it with some degree of fluency. The literature as well as the 
language is studied. 

First Year — Chardenal, Complete French Course. Meras and Roth, 

Petites Contes de France. 
Second Year — Chardenal, Complete French Course. Dumas, La 
Tulipe Noire; Malot, Sans Fainille. 

SCIENCE 

The academy is supplied with sufficient apparatus to be a valuable 
aid in the study of natural sciences. In physics, the subject is 
illustrated by many simple pieces of apparatus, besides the air pump, 
electrical machine, batteries, etc. Geology and Mineralogy are il- 
lustrated by a collection of more than twelve hundred specimens, 
presented to the academy by the Alumni. In Botany, plants are 
studied from nature and system's of classifications are made promi- 
nent. In all the sciences, objects are used as much as possible. 
The purpose of science work is as follows: 

First — To interest the pupil in the observation of nature. 

Second — To develop the power of reasoning through the original 
investigation of the truths of nature. 

Third — To give a practical knowledge of the elementary principles 
of those sciences which are new, in a great measure, causing our 
rapid progress in the civilization of tire world. 

first Year — General Science. 

Second Year — Botany. 

'I'll i rd Year — Physics. 

DOMESTIC SCIENCE 

The purpose of this course is to train the girls in the essentials 
of home-making. Household management is taught incidentally 
through the study of the preparation and serving of foods and the 
care of clothing and making of simple garments. 

11 



The course in sewing includes the use and care of the sewing 
machine, fundamental stitches and seams, mending and cutting, 
fitting and finishing simple garments. Students provide all ma- 
terials and garments made are the property of the student. 

The course in cooking includes the study of food materials, 
principles of cookery, cost and care of foods, nutritive value, bal- 
anced diet, preparation and serving of foods. 

MANUAL TRAINING 

It is the purpose of this course to spend one year in bench work 
in wood, and give the student an idea of cabinet making. The 
course will include furniture making. 

The second year course takes up wood turning. 

AGRICULTURE 

The course offered this year will be Animal Husbandry. The 
work in this course will consist hugely of observation trips. It is 
designed to Interest the student in the breeding of better stock on 
the farm. 

BIBLE STUDY 

There will be two three-hour courses offered in Bible study. 
One will take up the life of Christ, and the other Old Testament 
characters. It will lie possible for students to take one of these 
courses in addition to four other subjects. 

MUSIC 

The work in music will consist of chorus work for the entire 
student body, and special attnlion will be given to those who are in- 
terested in glee club work. Vocal lessons will be given to those 
who desire the work. A three-hour course will be given in harmony 

COMMERCIAL WORK 

This work will consist of typewriting, shorthand and bookkeep- 
ing. These courses will follow the work outlined by the New Castle 
Business College. These courses are designed to prepare the student 
for professional office work. 

12 



PHYSICAL EDUCATION 



It is the purpose of this department to furnish a wholesome 
recreation for the students, and also a systematic course in physical 
education. The school has a new gymnasium 55 feet by 90 feet long. 

Baseball, basketball, tennis and track work will be furnished for 
the boys. The basketball team won the district championship last 
year, and the baseball team was undefeated in fourteen games. 
Every boy is given an opportunity to play. 

The work for the girls consists of basketball, indoor baseball, 
tennis, hiking, and regular gymnasium work'. 

Physical education will be required for all students, unless they 
bring a written excuse from their parents. 

GENERAL ITEMS 

The government of the school is based upon the idea that man- 
hood and womanhood is more than scholarship; that self-respect and 
self-control on the part of a student are important factors in the 
formation of character. Greater stress is laid upon the thorough- 
ness of instruction and accuracy of knowledge than upon rapidity 
of advancement. 

For many years the health of the students has been uniformly 
good. There is probably no better location in the State in this 
respect. 

Both Friends and Methodists hold religious services on the 
Sabbath, and each maintains a Sabbath school. Meetings of the 
Young People's Society of Christian Endeavor and the Epworth 
League are held every Sabbath evening and students are welcome 
to their meetings and membership. 

A sufficient number of teachers is employed so that large classes 
may be avoided, and the student may receive personal attention. 

Expenses are as low as at any other school offering equal ad- 
vantages. 

The managers of the school are very careful to make this an insti- 
tution in which students who are away from home and its restraints 
will be surrounded by good moral influences. No student whose 
influnence is known to have a corrupting tendency, will be retained 
in the school. 

Students whose conduct is exemplary, and who complete the 
course of study, will be furnished a diploma, signed by the in- 

13 



structors and the president and secretary of the board of trustees. 
To receive a diploma a pupil should be in attendance at the academy 
one year, except when special arrangements are made with the 
superintendent and board of trustees. 

Care is used that students may learn the art of composition 
and public delivery. 

Five sets of encyclopedias are in the school rooms, and these, with 
the dictionaries and numerous reference books are for the free 
use of all. 

The texts adopted by the State Board of Education are used in 
the academy. 

EXPENSES 
Rates of Tuition 

Students who enter at irregular times will be charged full 
tuition for the term in case they complete the term's work in such 
manner as to receive credit toward the diploma. 

Special students and others who do not expect to earn credit in 
the regular course will be charged only for the time of actual en- 
rollment in the classes. 

Occasionally those who are particularly strong are permitted to 
earn credits by outside study under the supervision of the teachers. 
For such credits as these one-half the regular tuition is charged. 

Tuition, which amounts to , is due at the opening of each 

term, and sett lenient should be made with the superintendent or 
treasurer of the board of trustees. Students will receive no credit 
for work until the tuition is paid. 

Boarding 

The citizens of Spiceland have always given the students a 
hearty welcome by receiving them into their homes. The cost of 
boarding and looms in private families where everything is fur- 
nished can be had for $4 to $5 a week. 

Persons who may live near enough to go home at the end of the 
week, and who wish to economize, may reduce the cost of living 
to a comparatively small sum. 



14 



LIST OF STUDENTS 



Black, Nellie 
Coffin, William 
Deem, Dorothy 
Divelbiss, Bernard 
Hiner, Floyd 
Holloway, Evelyn 
McNew, Earl 



Brewer, Helen 
Booth, Nellie / 
Brown, Bernice 
Catt, Emogean I -- 
Chew, Donald,> 
Coffin, Mary L- 
Carr, Wilbur 
Catt, Pauline L- 
Denney, Estelle^"* 
Griffin, Louise *- 
Greenstreet, Mary 



Allen, Reuben 
Brewer, Myron 
Bundy, Esther 
Catt, Mildred 
Divelbiss, Gilbert 
Grau, Fred 
Ilinshaw, Franklin 
Holloway, Esther 
Hod son, Ruth 
Hodson, Ruby 



Bundy, Alice 
Bundy, Hilda 



Seniors 

Mayse, George 
Millikan, Levara 
Murphy, Mossie 
McFarland, Grace 
Shepherd, Dwight 
Snepherd, Horace 
Wilson, Carrie 

Juniors 

Leigh, Ralph i- 
Noah, Faye **■ 
Pierce, Glenn f t 
Peirce, Julia ' 
Pierson, Roger k'" 
Poer, Lucile «- 
Poor, Elmer u 
Pate, Pearl - 
Ratliff, Charles i- 
Reece, Violet *~ 
Stafford, Lowell 

Sophomore 

Myer, Robert 
Poer, Dorsey 
Reece, Russell 
Reece, Victor 
Smith, Ina 
Stafford, Edith 
Stafford, Ethel 
Stigleman, Hasael 
Thompson, Myrtle 
Winters, Icobert. 

Freshman 

Kennedy, Thelma 
Lacy, Wilbur 



Emminger, Louise 
Evans, Martha 
Griffin, Robert 
Harrison, Elsie 
Harrold, Pauline 
Hoff, Ermie 
Holtsclaw, Mary 
Hudelson, Lucile 
Johnson, Marie 



Leamon, La Veta 
Livingston, Ernest 
Lockridge, Carol 
Miles, Alma 
Miles, Pearl 
Modlin, Mida 
Pate, Martha 
Shepherd, Susie 
Starbuck, Walter 



LIST OF ACADEMY SUPERINTENDENTS 



Oliver Bales 18G9-18G3 

Clarkson Davis 1863-18G7 

Edward Taylor 18G7-18G8 

Clarkson Davis 18G8-1874 

Timothy Wilson 1S74-187G 

Clarkson Davis 187G-1S82 

Thomas Newlin 1882-1883 

William P. Pinkham. .1SS4-1885 



Thomas Newlin 1885-1892 

J. Frank Brown 1892-1893 

Arthur W. Jones 1893-1894 

George W. Neet 1894-1898 

Murray S. Wildman 1898-1901 

M. S. Woods 1901-1903 

Homer H. Cooper 1903-1916 

Joseph H. Blose 191G-1918 



Chester L. Reagan 1918 



16 



ALUMNI 



Officers For the Year 1919-20 

President Lena Shively Test 

Vice-President Susan Evans 

Secretary Irene Pickering 

Treasurer Roydon Gordon 

Orator .Walter Bundy 

Vice-Orator H. W. Painter 

Historian Gertrude Seaford 

Vice-Historian Lucile Mellvaine 

( Harmon Rayle 
Executive Committee ) Deci) p ie]ds Wollam 

I Griffin Moffit 



Those Marked (*) are Deceased. 

1870— *Eli U. Cook 

John J. Stubbs Omaha, Neb. 

1871— *Walter D. Jones 

♦Alvin H. Jenkins 

*I. Macy Good 

C. R. Dixon Paonia, Col. 

R. G. Boone Berkeley, Cal. 

*Dallas Sisson 

Mary Ballenger-Barnard New Castle 

♦Louisa Wickersham 

Lida Edwards-Saint New Castle 

1872 — Lindley H. Johnson Dunreith 

*David Henley 

* Jacob Hill 

Henry W. Painter New Castle, R. F. D. 1 

Robot G. Mitchell Pacific Grove, Cal. 

1873— *tfadie D. Talbei t-Wright 

Aaron B. Bell Springtown, Ark. 

*J. Tilman Hutchins 

17 



John Pennington Damascus, Ohio 

Mary Stubbs-Painter New Castle, R. F. D. 1 

Nathan Williams Omaja, Cuba 

S. Carrie Talbert-Newby Wichita, Kan. 

1874 — Alice Coffin-Russell New York City 

Alvira Spencer-Harold Indianapolis 

J. P. Edwards Spiceland 

William S. Moffett Kennard 

Edwin 0. Kennard Pasadena, Cal. 

Nathan Rosenfoerger Muscatine, Iowa 

*\V. E. Jackson 

D. C, Mitchell S])iceland 

% 1875--W. W. Gregg i Indianapolis 

William Pidgeon Bloomington 

Irvin Stanley Westfield 

1877— Milton Roberts Linnville, Iowa 

1878— S. Ella Bogue-Dogget Danville. Va. 

Belle Chambers-Bailey New Castle 

J. Pinkney Mitchell Seattle. Wash. 

Thomas Mitchell Olin, N. C. 

Flora Moore-Bailey Lincolnville 

I *John 0. Reed 

♦William Seaford 

Fannie Thornburg-Parsons Oak Park, 111. 

1879— J. A. Buck Terre Haute 

Carrie Goodwin-Jeffrey New Castle 

Thomas Newlin Greensboro, N. C. 

1S80— .1. Edgar Cloud San Diego, Cal 

William N. I -a nib San Francisco, Cal. 

Mallta Lamb Outland Amboy 

. Ada Grace Murphy Chattanooga, Tonu. 

I Ida May Roberts Boulder, Col. 

Finma Belle Roberts Boulder, Col. 

Frank Syinons Portland, Maine 

Lainira Tiueblood-Kelluin Cainby, Ind. 

1881— Oscar R. Baker ; .Winchester 

*Corrie Bogue 

18" 



Minnie Benedict-Blankenship Paragon 

Carrie Unthank-Kellum Indianapolis 

♦Jessie Stratton 

1882— *Arthur H. Baily 

J. Newton Barnard Daleville 

Harriet Bogue-Newlin Indianapolis 

Harriet E. Dickinson Spiceland 

Charles Newlin Indianapolis 

1883 — Anna Huddelson-Foster Washington, D. C. 

Ryland Ratlil'f Danville 

♦Julia Stafford-Newby 

Emily Weeks Middletown it. F. I). 1 

1884— *Cora Kirk 

Ella Stratton-IIodson New Castle R. F. D. 10 

Virginia Gril'fin-uory Dunreith 

Isadore Hall-Wilson Spiceland 

William .Julian Hastings, Neb. 

Charles No why Converse 

1885 — Mary L. Brown-Pennington Spiceland 

Alfred Y. King Mt. Vernon, 111. 

Oliver C. Steele Spiceland 

188G— L. Winnie Baily-Clement Haddoniield, N. J. 

Mattie E. Brown Daytona, Fla. 

Richard Broadbent El wood 

Elbert Griffin Elwood 

Alonzo C. Hodson New Castle R. F. D. 10 

*John L. McNew 

Russell Ratliff Marion 

1887— Herbert T. Badly Spiceland 

Clarence II. Beard Indianapolis 

Anna K. Bogue-Shafi'er ....Benton Harbor, Mich. 

Li i id ley Campion Toinah, Wis. 

Elizabeth S. lliatt-Geneau Omaha, Neb. 

Abraham L. Miller Binninghaui, Ala. 

Bert Smith Zionsville 

1SS8 — Rhoda Ballenger-tJunnlnghani Indianapolis 

♦Hannah Brown-Slribbing 

19 



* 

j 



Orynthis Brown-Jester Pay ton, Iowa 

♦Jessie Butler 

Clara G. Edwards-Knight St. Louis, Mo. 

John C. Cook New Castle 

Eva Elii ott-Compton Tomah, Wis. 

Achsah E. Ratcliff-Ratcliff Richmond 

Harmon H. Rayle Spiceland 

Charles Stubbs Frankfort 

J. A. Greenstreet New Castle 

H. H. Ratcliff Connersville 

1889 — Laura Benedict Indianapolis 

Blanch Braddock-McNew ■. Greenfield 

Frank Copeland Dunreith 

Estella Deem-Kennedy Greensburg 

♦Lawrence Gardner 

Gertrude Gordon-Geneaux Victoria, Texas 

Sue Griffin-Evans Spiceland 

Otis Stubbs New Lisbon 

May White Pasadena, Cal. 

1890 — L. Etta Buller Lewisville, R. F. D. 

Elmer Deem Frankfort 

Edwin D. Uateliff Knightstown 

Bonnie Stratton New Castle, R. F. D. 1 

S. E. Stubbs Wilkinson 

1891— Ethel E. Copeland-Lee Meacleville, Pa. 

Louie Edmundson-Poe Indianapolis 

Maurine Gardner-Kern Cadiz 

Charles N. Hardy Markleville 

Alice Miatt-Copeland Cincinnati, O. 

Ernest Sisson Greenfield 

Alfred Symons Supai, Ariz. 

Mary M. Teas-Pa rker lOaton, O. 

Charles TiUts Warrington 

Herbert 1». Woodard Chicago. 111. 

1892— Messo S. Daily 

Clara Drown Kpkolainl 

Warren T. Ifivaiia Cftnby, Minn. 

John li. Greenstreet Lewisville, It. F. I). 

20 



Winnie Hinshaw-Milligan Winchester 

David M. Kemp Kempton 

Alice Lawrence Spiceland 

Estella Symons Minneapolis, Minn. 

Alvin Ulrieh Greensboro 

1893— Oscar Eogue Spiceland 

Estella Charles-Fawcett Indianapolis 

Floy Hill Pasadena, Cal. 

Arthur Holloway Spiceland 

Leora Jessup-Parker Scott City, Kan. 

John Miller New Castle 

♦Olen Payne : 

Lena Rayle-Smith Spiceland 

George H. Smith New Castle 

Oiville White Joplin, Mo. 

1894— Minnie Black-Moore Chicago, 111. 

Bessie I. Brown-Stone Daytona, Fla. 

Clarence V. Hall New Castle 

Horace Hardy Markleville 

Ida Holloway-Kenworthy Wilmington 

Arlie Hood Omaha, Neb. 

Bertha Jessnp Clay Center, Neb. 

Elnia Lawrence Spiceland 

Maude M. Shaffer-By rket New Castle 

Frank Pitts Evansville 

♦Oscar F. Symons 

1895 — Clarence Painter New Castle 

Mabel Wright-Gaar Cambridge City 

Edgar Cox Clarkson, N. C. 

♦Nellie Ratliff 

Howard Henley , Tattle, Okla. 

Maud Wildman-Evans Philadalphia, Pa. 

Frank lludelsoh Mays 

♦Pearl Moffetl-Wood 

189G — Cora IFudson-Boguo Spiceland 

Clara Wliite-Wildman Sehna, O. 

IOIsie lludelson-Holhuid Drooklyn, N. Y. 

Anna Morris-Wilson South Wabash 

21 



Pearl M. James-Tweedy Wabash 

Mabel Newby-Hood Omaha, Neb. 

W. J. Carson San Francisco, Cal. 

Nora Griffin-Beach Richmond 

Theresa Wildman Philadelphia, Pa. 

Roscce Edwards New Castle 

1897 — Leoti Applcgatc-Coffin Spiceland 

Klva M. Hudson-Hall Spiceland 

Lois M. Henley Indianapolis 

♦Fannie Hayes 

Floy Hudelson Greenfield 

Josie 13. Harland-Weatherman Dana 

Jessie Leakey-Hiatf New Lisbon 

Pearl Millikan-Hardy .J Markleville 

Ethel Rifner-Newby Englewood, Kan. 

Mayme Staff ord-Applegate Spiceland 

Clyde Sisson-Moore Indianapolis 

Minnie Stafford-Stratton New Castle, R. F. D. 

Charles H. Smith Philadelphia, Pa. 

"Irving White 

1898— Clifford Applegate Spiceland 

James Holtsclaw Spiceland 

*Bavis Nay 

Emory Ratcliff Fresnol, Cal. 

Gertrude Sea l ord Spiceland 

Pearl Synions-Rifner Spiceland 

Leila Smith-Rice Spiceland 

Charles A. Heard New York City 

Merritt Stafford Carthage 

Cora Smith-Sparks Smnmitville 

Walter Painter North Vernon 

Bertha Charles-Hewitt Harlem, Mont. 

Ernest Sliockley Angola 

Elsie Shoc:kley-L»ckridge Shawnee, Okla. 

1S99— Bessie llaisley Alvin, Texas 

♦Bertha Lawrence-McGracen 

Florence Macy-Parker Carthage 

Earl Moffett Knightstown, R. F. D. 2 

Walter T. Pearce Rushville 

Orahcll Shaffer-Bell New Castle, R. F. D. 2 

22 



1900 — Ethel Applegate-Painter Spiceland 

Edgar Bazzle St. Paul, Minn. 

Susan Benedict-Nay Springport 

*Cora Charles-Carson 

Connie Griffin Knightstown 

David W. Gordon Chicago 

Guy H. Mall New Lisbon 

Clyde Kennedy Berkeley, Cal. 

Clarence Macy Scott City, Kan. 

Everett Macy Scott City, Kan. 

Carroll Mills Kirksville, Mo. 

Cecil Newby Englewood, Kan. 

♦Jeanette ltifner 

Pei'ina Thornburg-Griffin Atwood, Col. 

John R. Thompson New Castle 

1901— Ira E. Bell New Castle, R. F. D. 2. 

Bertha Butler-Ballard Lewisville 

Raymond By rice t Lewisville 

Jennie Compton-Cope , Dunreith 

Everett e Cope Dunreith 

Deborah Edwards Knightstown, R. F. D. 

Ethel Ed wards-Kramein Bloomington, 111. 

Lillian H. Hayes Dunreith 

Walter B. Harvey Pittsburgh, Pa. 

John R. Hinshaw New Castle 

Everest Macy Wichita, Kan. 

Georgia Millikan-Hardy Pendleton 

Jennie E. Millikan-Wright Edinburg 

Homer Nugen Lewisville 

Cora E. Risk-Deem Spiceland 

Robert A. Roberts New Albany 

Grace E. Stewart-Johnson Greenfield 

Russell L. Wright New Castle 

Walter C. Wright Pasadena, Cal. 

1902— Harley Anderson Spiceland 

Jessie Baily-Pierce Knightstown 

Mary Butler New Castle, R. F. D. 1 

Walter Byers Knightstown, R. F. D. 1 

Jennie Kirk-Kerr Broojcville 

23 



Guerney Maple Whittier, Cal. 

Manning Smith '. Philadelphia. Pa. 

Iiena Thomas-Macy Fountain City 

Retta Thomas Fountain City 

Russell Wilson Palo Alto, Cal. 

India Yost-Cook Sulphur Springs 

1903— Rilla Bartlett-Har.vey Pittsburgh, Pa. 

Nellie Beckett Whittier, Cal. 

Perrin Holt New Castle 

Arthur Johnson Lewisville 

Carl Newby Mulhall, Okla. 

Rupert Redie El Paso, Tex. 

Ralph Stubbs Spiceland 

Walter Wright ' Edinburg 

1904— *Elsie Bell-Applegate ■ 

Josephine Beeson-Niles Connersville 

Will Benedict Eos Angeles, Cal. 

Lawrence Bridges Greenfield 

Warren Edwards Knightstown 

Irl Evans Mt. Summit 

Jessie Gordon-Newby Richmond 

Ruth Harvey Dunreith 

Hazel Heacock-Yockey Spiceland 

Homer Henley New Castle 

Claire I loover-May Indianapolis 

Barton Jones South Bend 

Belva Jordan-Coffin New Castle, R. F. D. 1 

Guy May , Indianapolis 

Pansy Newby Lewisville 

Anna Painter Whittier, Cal. 

Clara ['atterspn-Rothrock. . .New Castle, II. F I). 1 

Lois I ills Morristown. K. I 1 '. I). 

Wendell l'itls Morristown, It, F I). 

Lawrence Beeves Knightstown 

Robert Reeves Wilkinson 

Etta Uifner-Parker Indianapolis 

John Rogers Mooreland 

♦Herbert Seaford 

Ralph Silver San Francisco, Cal. 

24 



Bernetha Smith Muncie 

Charles Veach Dunreith 

Ethel Wright-Hershaur Rushville 

Harold Yockey Oklahoma City, Okla. 

1905 — Elsie Anderson-Conwell Mooreland 

Walter Brandy Washington, Pa. 

Raymond Duke Indianapolis 

Alexander Gano Indianapolis 

Oran Griffin Indianapolis 

Ruth Gardner New Castle, R. F. D. 1 

Elva Kennard-Mueller New Castle 

Aura Lane-Lee Lewisville 

Edward Pope New Castle, R. F. D. G 

Jessie Reece Long Beach, Cal. 

Ruby Reeves Knightstown 

Anna Reeves Wilkinson, R. F. D. 1 

♦Arthur Rifner 

Arden Stubbs Spiceland 

Everettc Test Hagerstown 

Amy Thomas-Sherry Willow Branch 

■ Paul Wilson New Castle 

190G— Charles Bundy Muncie 

Walter Bundy Basel Switzerland 

Arthur Iludelson Connersville 

Hazel Iludelson Dunreith 

*Edna Kellar 

Francis Nugen Hagerstown 

Myron Painter Spiceland 

Edgar Rogers Mooreland 

Oiis Shaffer Richmond 

Maude Simnions-Bolin Zanesville, O. 

drover VanDuyn Shirley 

Orville Wright New Castle, It. l<\ I). 

1907- -Hazel Bartloft Lewisville 

Irene Bell-Wright Whittier, Cal. 

Bertha Bowers-Rogers Mooreland 

Ruby McDaniel-Retherford. . .New Castle, R. F. D. 

Levinus Painter Poplar Ridge, N. Y. 

Howard Seaford Spiceland 

Clenna Smith-Moffitt Lewisville 

Hassel Williams Muncie 



25 



190S— Herschel Alf Lewisville 

Clara Burch am-Hinsh aw New Castle 

Ethel Chandler-Swindell Spiceland 

Lorn a Delon-Humphrey Spiceland 

Margaret Harden-Painter Poplar Ridge, N. Y. 

Ruby Julian-Reece Washington, D. C. 

Everette Kennard Knightstown, R. P. D. 

Glenn Kirkhani Rushville, 11. P. D. 9 

Paul McDaniel Knightstown, R. P. D. 3 

Vida Rcdic-Cojault El Paso, Tex. 

Hazel Rcese-Clampett Greensboro 

Bessie Sidwell St. Clairsville, O. 

Mary Seaford-Alf Denver, Col. 

Edna Swindell ' Greensboro 

Lucile Wilson-Howard Pasadena, Cal. 

1909— Beulah Arnold New Castle. R. F, D. 6 

Loren Butler Spiceland 

Marie Clarke-Little apringfield 

Walter Hays Markleville 

Uutli Hiidelson-Gold New Castle, R. P. I). 10 

Ethel Jackson-Clayton Straughn 

Ada Jarrett-Hinshaw Kennard 

Lucile Mcllcainc Lewisville 

James McGrady New Castle 

Griffin Moffitt Knightstown, R. P. D. 

Alma Osborn Winchester, R. P. D. 

Elgar Pennington Hartford, Conn. 

Hoyt Reese Whittier, Cal. 

Hazel Skaates-Hance Newman 

Minnie Sinmions-Stalcy Knightstown 

Margaret Smith Spiceland 

Clayton Teeter New Castle 

Ross Williams Richmond 

Perry Wilson New Castle 

1910 — Mary Antrim Wilson Spiceland 

Helen Uartlett-Pottenger Indianapolis 

Clarence Cnrtwriglit Lewisville 

Nettie GriSKOin-Allcn New Castle 

Marie Hendricks Straughn 

26" 



Bernice Hcnshaw Dunreith 

Mary Jessup-Sinith Spiceland 

Minnie Kiser-Boyd New Castle 

Andrew Markle Middletown 

Ruth May Straughn 

Ruth Moffett Pendleton 

Clarence Rich Mays, R. F. D. 25 

Hazel Seaford-Winan Denver, Col. 

Lena Shively-Test New Castle, R. F. D. 

William Smith Spiceland 

Edith Stigelnian-Moffitt Knightstown, R. P. D. 

Leanna Taylor-McNew Knightstown, R. P. 1). 

Ralph Test Spiceland 

Kerney Wilson Spiceland 

1911— Roy Brown Spiceland 

Howard Caldwell Indianapolis 

Hazel Cochran-Lane Spiceland 

Ruba Cochran-Symons Lewisville 

Ralph Evans Spiceland 

Decil Fields- Woollani Spiceland 

Ruth A. Harvey Spiceland 

Howard Harvey New Castle 

Clarence Hoffman Spiceland 

Myru Hunnicutl-Beard Economy 

Margaret Hunnicutt-Stuart Hagerstown 

Grace Myers-Hoover New Castle, R. P. D. 

Myra Painter-Rayle Seattle, Wash. 

Everett Pennington Spiceland 

El ill a Pierson-Smullen Lewisville 

Rex Potterf Lewisville 

Merwin Symons Lewisville 

Ernestine Williams-Millikan New Castle 

1912— Sadie Bacon Mt. Summit 

Dorothy Bell-Lewellyn Mississippi 

Ralpn Chandler Spiceland 

Edith Chow-Molfitt Knightstown 

Ruth Conner Lewisville 

Certnnle DoWitte-Catoy straughn 

Russell liwing Knightstown 

21 



Paul Fletcher Lewisville 

Alvin Hardin Knightstown 

Martha Hayes-Hicks Portland, Ind. 

Melissa Lane Harlem, Mont. 

Mabel Maey-Hardin Spiceland 

Exie Moffett Pendleton 

Clara Montgomcry-Bradway New Castle 

Norma Piei'son Lewisville 

Rachel Test-Fletcher Lewisville 

Margaret Toohey-Cornell Florence, Ala. 

Audrey West-Hays Markleville 

1913— *Mabnl Ituck-Synions 

Addie Butler ....New Castle, R. P. D. 

Marie Bundy Spiceland 

Olive DeWitte-Gauker Straughn 

Jessie Drapor-Pidgeon Spiceland 

Anna. Evans Spiceland 

Iris Hall Ilagerstown 

Georgia Hodson-Wilson Knightstown 

Ploas Kisor Dunrieth 

Mildred Mercer-Cox Elwood 

Hazel Moffltt-Price Knightstown 

Lenora Picket t-Lord Dunreith 

Lydia Sellers Spiceland 

♦Raymond Stubbs 

Zola Waddell Indianapolis 

Erecl Wilson-Richey Kokomo 

1914— Marie Black New Castle 

Harold Brown Straughn 

Helen Dougherty .* Treaty 

Cortez Rwing Knightstown 

Pauline Ilaisley-Jackson KnighlsLowu 

Fred Hardin Knightstown, R. P. I). 2 

Carl Jarred Spiceland 

Lowell J.el'i'eries New Castle, R. b\ I). 2 

Irene MeDaniel Markleville 

Albert McIIvaine Lewisville 

Marie Modlin Marion 

Agues Ponnington-Delon Spiceland 

28 " 



Vivian Pickering Spiceland 

/ Clyde Rogers .Dunreith 

Maurine Shepherd-Gray New Castle 

Mary Swain Mimcie 

, Norman Woodward New Castle, R. F. D. 

1915 — Frank Delon Spiceland 

Doris Evans Spiceland 

Wannetta Hall-Stahr Ilagerstown 

Louise Hill Richmond 

Irene Pickering Spiceland 

Adrain Pratt New Castle 

Paul Reece Knightstown 

Mildred Stewart-Hardin Knightstown 

Leslie Trohaugh Rushville 

191C— Earl Antrim Spiceland 

Venton Brenneman New Castle 

Ruby Brewer Indianapolis 

Claude Deem Dunreith 

Royden Gorden Spiceland 

Ezra Hill Spiceland 

Ruth Holloway Spiceland 

Hazel Holloway Spiceland 

Marie Hofl'man-Jarrett Spiceland 

Monia .lay Greensboro 

Marion Jeffries New Castle 

Clyde Mercer Indianapolis 

Irene Pennington Spiceland 

Edward Poer Spiceland 

Ruth Ratliff Spiceland 

Arnold Templeton Richmond 

Mark Thomas Spiceland 

Nellie True Spiceland 

1917— Mary Butler New Castle 

llollis Ewing Knightstown 

Hugh Cannaway Harlem, Mont. 

Caroline Gannaway Harlem, Mont 

Olen Kimhrel Dunreith 

Hildred McNew Indianapolis 

Damon Poarch Richmond 

29 



Hazel Ratliff Indianapolis 

Kathleen Carter Indianapolis 

Cash Essington New Castle 

Howard Hinshaw Dunreith 

Ralph McFarland Dunreith 

Grace Pate New Castle 

Emma Poer Spiceland 

Myron Pike Crawrordsville 

1918 — Edna Addison Spiceland 

Robert Grau Spiceland 

Real rice Boyd Dunreith 

Gertrude Chandler Dunreith 

Price Grii't'in Richmond 

Robert Hinshaw Greensboro 

Park Kirk Richmond 

Edna Painter Spiceland 

Pauline Pickering Spiceland 

Opal Jackson Spiceland 

Arland McNew Richmond 

Ruth Pier.son Spiceland 




Banner Print, Knlghtstown. Ind 



30 




I 

1 



CONTrJENTS: 



Greeting 



♦ 



Spiceland Academy as a Normal School 

S ] • i < • • ■ ] ; u i d as a Business Center 

Seience in ISleittentary Schools , 

Value of Schools in a Republic, Charles I}. Newby 

Athletics at the Academy 

Personal Mention 

Some Things we Claim ; 

Teaching Manners 4 

Hooks ami Heading 

Reading in the Lower Grades. Virginia UriJJin 

Kducational Notes 

Local Items 

He!]) for Students , 



Bpieelan^, Inc; 



1 1 



December 



1890 




rHINTED FOR THK ACADEMY. 



Har 




-a. 



-Prices- 



are, 



'■•••I 



'00 



Gas Fitting Roofing and Spouting. 

Agent for PAGE WOVEN WII^E 



Toilet 

% Mjtcods. 

Picture : 
Easel?, 

Picture 

I Frames, 

Autograph 

Alliums. 



^{OLID^Y (|OODS: 

I At the POSTOFFICE in 
W ' Spiceland. . 

he Finest of Box Paper and Stationery, 
he Prettiest Photograph Albums, 
he most Handsome Toilet cases, 
he cutest to}-s for the children, 
he funniest games for both old and young, 
he best books for X-mas presents for boys 
and Q-irls. 



FINE BRUSHES AND COMBS, 

In fact, almost every kind of 

At the Post Office. 



©reeling. 



I N presenting the Si'IC'kj.and Acadio.mv JIkpoutki: to the public we 
n 5 do so in tli o hope that it may prove both interesting and instructive. 
^-^ We are not only willing but desirous to let the public know what 
the Spiooland Academy is doing as an educational institution, and also 
to present the claims of Spioeland as a place when- parents can find a 
pleasant borne, as well as a good educational center. We want clearly 
to place before our readers just what the school stands for and makes a 
pretension of doing. We do not pretend to run a college, or normal 
school, or a normal college, or a normal university. We are trying 
earnestly and persistently to do the work propen^belonging to an Acad- 
emy. We believe we are located in a community Whore the school in- 
terest is as intense and united as anywhere in the State. The High 
Schools of this and adjoining counties a re doing a good and efficient work, 
and not one word of opposition or denunciation do we have for (hem, but 
rather we w ish to encourage them in their good work. And yet we feel 
that we occupy a position which is not and cannot be filled by the ordi- 
nary High School; at least this difference is great enough to warrant 
our continuance along the lines already started. The home life of our 
students is much more favorable lor Study than in larger (owns and 
cities; from the nature of our surroundings the teachers can come into 
closer contact with the pupils, and t bus more sympathy will be gener- 
ated. One strong point we claim is a system of personal supervision as 
opposed to class> supervision. Without boasting, we may justly claim 
that our teaching force is qualified, both by study and experience, for the 
work each one is doing. While we do not claim to run a normal school 
in the true sense of that term, yet we point, with pride to our facilities 
and success in the fitting of teachers for their work, and feel that we oc- 
cupy a needed Hold in this regard, (tut, we do not claim to lurn out 
proficient teachers w ith one or two terms work wi(l) us We strive to 
help teachers with the practical school-room problems quite as much as 
to get a good certificate. Wo believe that Illness for ((•aching is com- 
posed of two factors — natural ability and acquired ability— and wo also 
believe that natural ability can be cultivated and acquired ability gained 
through study and contact w ith teachers of experience, and this is all 
we claim to do. in this regard We are glad to stand on the record al- 
ready made. 

Again, when it'is known that nearly fifty percent of our graduates, 
and a large number of our undergraduates, have, after leaving the Acad- 
emy, entered other and higher institutions of learning, our work as a col- 



2 



lego preparatory school will be apparent This department we wish to en- 
courage and .stimulate. The ideal teaching; is that which gives the pupil 
an undying thirst for higher attainments. This is our highest ambition, 
and this end is ever kept in view. 

The course of study is so arranged that a student can enter at any 
time and find work to suit. The course of study includes those subjects 
which are, in the opinion of educators generally, best fitted for practical 
business life The school has experienced a normal, healthful growth, as 
is shown by the uniform increase in the numbers attending the High 
School and Normal course during the past five years. 

These words have been written in no boastful spirit, but in order to 
answer many enquiries which reach us from time to time. We desire to 
claim nothing for tin. 1 school and community which they do not possess, 
and to make n<> promises which we cannot fulfill. "We want the school 
to stand on its own merits. We wish to express our grateful feelings to 
our friends and patrons lor the support and encouragement of the Acad- 
emy, and will strive to work so that we will merit a still larger patronage 
and a fuller degree of confidence in the future. With this determination 
anil hope we send forth the IIeportku. 



Spicclnnd Academy as a Normal Scljool. 

More than seventy- live percent, of all the graduates of Spieeland Acad- 
emy have been teachers alter graduation for a longer or shorter period. 
Besides this fact, a large per cent, of all the students who reach sutlicient 
advancement have become teachers. Each year from twenty-Jive to forty 
voting men and women teach in Henry and adjoining counties who were 
students in Spice laud Academy the year previous. Of the whole number 
of teachers in Henry county fifty-two per cent of them have been edu- 
cated in part or entirely at Spieeland Academy, and all the neighboring 
counties contain many teachers educated at Spieeland. 

A consideration of these facts would lead any one to conclude that the 
Academy has influenced the ((aching force of Henry and adjoining 
counties to a large extent. This leads us to consider two questions; 
What are the legitimate functions of 11 normal school ; and second, does 
Hpkcland Academy fulfill the functions to warrant (he name of normal 
school? The idea of what constitutes fitness for teaching is the product 
of a growth, whose different stages are clearly marked in the history of 
educational progress in this country. 

One of our most thoughtful writers defines a normal school as a 
model school of secondary instruction, whose pupils purpose to become 
teachers, and are lilted to do educational work of a higher type through 
some mastership of the history and the science of education. 

The first notion of fitness for teaching certainly was and is scholar- 
ship. Without (his equipment no one can even make the pretense of 
teaching. Should a normal school give academic instruction or should 
this be presupposed on entering upon a normal course? It seems clear 
to the writer that it is the legitimate function of the normal school to 



give academic instruction. First of all, the teacher must bo a scholar, and 
under this term should always be included literary culture, a love ol" 
books and a love of schools. The teacher should pursue a course of study 
which could rightly be termed liberal, and this course should include 
practical disciplinary studies, such as algebra, geometry and physics, as 
well as the culture studies, geography, history and literature. 

lint the teacher of the present day needs more than mere scholarship. 
Teaching ability and scholarship are mil equivalents, although the first 
must always include tin- second. The second singe in the growth of the 
idea or the fitness for teaching is uhIIuhI. This represents the art side of 
teaching; It is tho tnetnis to the <•/«/, but in order to know (he means the 
end must bo thoroughly known. Moreover, to know the end by w ay of 
sehlarship, goes a long way toward suggesting some way of reaching 
that end. 

Method may be acquired in one or all id" three ways. First, it may 
be learned from books on pedagogy or by listening to lectures on (he art 
of teaching. This may be called tin' scientific method, and every teach- 
er should get much to help him in his methods in this way. Second, the 
student may gaijA much in method by his experience as a student, by 
drinking in, so/to speak, the methods and ways of his teachers. This is 
a legacy which every teacher has left to him, consciously or uncOnoious-' 
ly. Third, the teacher may learn much by observation, which is the 
Custom in training schools. The difficulty in this procedure is (hat so 
often the school observed is not the type id' the one to be reproduced, 
hence when imitation is attempted an error is always round. But there 
is a. third stage in the idea of fitness for teaching, which may be repre- 
sented by science or doctrine. It includes (he principles that underlie 
the method. The strictly scientific or professional studies of the normal 
school are psychology and (he history of education. A science underlies 
every art; the science may not be known, but the ai t will generally be 
better practiced if the fundamental principles upon which it rests are 
known. Hence, instead of the formula ".we learn to do by doing," we will 
substitute the scientific formula, "we learn to do by knotcfny and doing.'' 
It is only in recant years that it has been at all generally acknowledged 
that mental science is of value to teachers. It is of two principal uses to 
the timelier: i( will enable him to judge scientifically <d' existing meth- 
ods, whether they be correct or not, and only then can he hope to devise 
other and better methods, 

Then we may say that lilness for teaching includes the irhit, the four, 
and t he why, or xch»hn ■nh/'ii wet /nut, a n<| prinn pica. The teacher must know 
more than he attempts to teach, he must know how lie is going to (each 
it, and he must know why he thinks best to pursue a certain method. 

Now as to the second question/ has Spiccland Academy done the 
work that legitimately belongs to a normal school? 

As to scholarship none will deny that the course of study is liberal 
for the scope which it intends to cover. It is intended to open up to the 
student some insight of himself and tiro world. The course is intended 
to reach that culture which Plato ascribes to the Philosopher: "A lover, 
not of parted' wisdom, hut of (he whole; who has a taste for every sort 
of knowledge, and is curious to learn, and is never satisfied; who has. 



4 



.magnificence of mind and is the spectator of all time and all existence; 
who is harmoniously constituted; of a well proportioned mind ; who has 
a good memory, and is quick to learn ; noble, gracious, the friend of truth, 
justice, courage, temperance," Hero method is taught both by didactic 
and empirical processes. A text is studied on pedagogy, lectures are 
given to intending teachers on practical school management, and, as in 
every other school, observation is free to all, and the methods of the class 
room are intended in some sense to give an insight to methods in other 
schools. 

Psychology is taught with special reference to educational problems, 
and the principles underlying method are in some measures explained. 

To conclude, it may he said, without boasting, that Spiceland Acad- 
emy has in a large degree fulfilled the tunc lions of a normal school, both 
in sending forth many teachers and in possessing the right to do so. it 
occupies a much needed field, a field that the ordinary High School can 
not occupy. This in the mind of the writer is the excuse for its exis- 
tence. It is needed, and must continue to occupy the Hold as heretofore, 
only more largely anil efficiently. — Ahmmi Annua'.. 

L 

Spieelancl us a Business Center. 

The tow n of Spiceland is a growing town of about 800 inhabitants, sit- 
uated <ui the Lake Krio A; Western Railway. 'Tis the location of the 
well known Spiceland Academy, one of the best institutions of the State. 
The people :U'e mora I and temperate; never has hi en a saloon in the pi ace. 
The business men are prosperous and enterprising, the mechanics and 
I iboring men are busy at good wages, the buildings are much better oh 
am average than they genera 'ly are in towns of this size; the country 
around i> very fertile and plenty of ihe best of timber near. The water is 
excellent and easy to gut. Free, good roads lead in everj direction from 
the town. Three churches are lure. The citizens lind it a very healthy 
place w ith but little sickness. There are four mails each day, with tele- 
graph and telephone ullleess, a daily hack lino with Duurcith and ( i roons- 
boro, taxes are low, throe large libraries accessible to all, and cost of liv- 
ing small. A large supply of natural gas used for fuel and lighting the 
town ; plenty of natural gas here for manufacturing purposes. A Board of 
Trade to look after the interests of the town, a large saw mill, planing 
mill and furniture factory now running, another saw mill and planing mill 
combined with a butter dish and wooden ware factory now being- erected ; 
a large window glass factory, with almost two acres now under roof, will 
in a few weeks begin making w indow glass, to work seventy-five hands, 
the monthly pay roll to lie $0*000 to ijU),00Q; a large hub and spoke factory 
located here by a Pennsylvania firm to be built in the spring; other large 
factories a re figuring to locate here. The town is on a boom ; a new addition 
called South Side has been laid out by a w ealthy syndicate, on which 
many lots have been sold ; many buildings are in course of erection, and 
the prospect lot- spring is t hat a great many residences will be put up. 
Men of wealth are investing large sums of money here, and (he town is 



5 



j bound to go. If you wish to change your location for any purpose, if you 
wish to live in a'good moral town, if you want to invest your money, 
if you want to engage in manufacturing, we want you at Spiceland. 



Science in Elcmcntaf y Schools. 

The true teacher can no longer bo satisfied with tread-mill work. To do 
no better than our predecessors should make us ashamed of ourselves. 
Pong ago it was discovered the three IPs would not suffice for education. 
Teiwliiru/ is a significant term, and should contain a volume of meaning to 
all those who are numbered in its ranks. Itmoans first of all that the 
teacher must give the child the ability </<■ something — as to read* to 
write, to draw, to see. Again, it is to enable the child to know something; 
hence useful facts, very many of them, will be taught, and then the 
teacher is to help the pupil to think and to renxon, and the recitation must 
look toward those important ends. Put this is not enough yet, for the 
child must be mil in fid right, and this is a matter of great importance. 
Education me/tns much more than the piling up of facts. Wisdom has 
no objective existence, but is only found in wise minds; so science; is not 
found in books, nor elsewhere in an objective form, but only hi scientific 
minds. And the great aim of science teaching in any grade is to 
awaken thought, and to cultivate the observing [lowers. No teacher 
however wise or skilled can give his pupils science ; all he can hope to do 
in this direction is to give them directions for becoming scientific. Books, 
definitions and rides are often quite helpful, but lot no one think they 
are science in themselves. 

The teacher in the country school is often puzzled to know what 
matter to take up and the met hod to pursue. It is often u rged that there 
is no time in the busy days of tin' school term. People as a rub- do net 
refrain from eating their meals for the lack of time. It needs only to be 
realized that this work is an essential part of the course of study and 
time will be found tor it ('arel'ul preparation should be made for each 
lesson, and the teacher should have well in mind just what points he 
means to bring out. The work will be carried mi to a large extent by 
means of object lessons. Now, an object lesson is a lesson from an object 
— not merely about an object. The purpose of these lessons should be to 
gain a culture in attention, observation, reflection, and in the use of oral 
language. Now, suppose the subject is a study of plants, the following 
will indicate a method that may be used. There i~ no season of the year 
when plants can not be had for study: 

I. Lessons to point out the parts of a plant. 

1. To describe tlie parts. 

2. To name the parts, as root, stein, leaves, etc. 

:). To describe the parts of each part, as of the leaf or flower. 
I F. Lessons to trace the growth of plants. 

1. Kmbryo — use a beaii soaked for twenty-four hours, 
ii. ( i row th — use same bean al ter tw o or three days. 
;S. Leaf buds. 



6 



4. Flower buds. 

5. Fruit. 

6. Seed. 

Have all these parts so the pupils can examine them. 
HI. Lessons on pointing out tin; likeness and the diiferences in the 
parts. This will bring out comparison* 

IV. Lessons on differences in the habits of plants, illustration ex- 
amples, Kim. Pea, Ivy, Squash, Grape, Etc. 

V. I'se of plants. 

Which part is used? For what used? Why? 

VI. Special lessons on a given tree, as the Oak or Maple. 

These lessons may be continued indefinitely, but care must be used 
to know that tlio pupil knows from experience what lie is talking about. 
Never allow- guesses. 

Lessons like this on plants may he given in Physiology, Zoology, 
Geology and Geography, besides more elementary work in Size, Form, 
Color. Direction. Distance, etc. The work is abundant. The great trou- 
ble will be that we will try to do too much. The teaching in modern 
schools must touch many sides of the pupil, and this kind of work will 
touch some phases of life which are missed by arithmetic and grammar. 



Value of Schools in a Republic, 

('HAS. I!. NIOWISY, [MM XC 1 1' A L A t'ADKM V, NEW PROVIDENCE, IOWA. 

Yes, the schools are t he hope of the republic, and the fact ought to be 
considered the welfare and happiness of the nation. We boast the free- 
dom of a republic founded upon equality of citizenship, a government 
under which every citizen may have free exercise of his powers so long 
as he does not injure individuals or commit treason against the govern- 
ment. The wildest anarchist may use whatever speech or print what- 
ever defamatory articles against our institutions that he is able to con- 
jure up. The ex I remcst fanatic fools the restraint of law no more than 
does the most pull-back conservative. 

This condition of freedom which we enjoy is pleasing and profitable, 
but it brings danger as well as profit, ov H as well as good ■ for' republics 
instead of direct ing and sba pi tig sent i mont and character, are themselves 
formed and directed by the character of the citizens; instead of being 
educators of the people, they themselves are the results of education. 
Despotic governments exert much influence in shaping the course of ac- 
tion of their citizens; in republics the citizens shape the course of action 
for the government. The force which controls our institutions to public 
sentiment, the desires of a majority of the citizens, ami whatever deter- 
mines the direction of the desires givcw character to our institutions. 

The danger imposed ii| us by these conditions arises from (he quality 

of the good and the bad. The man who works w ith the most selfish of mo- 
tives has equality with him w ho is disposed to work only for the general 



7 



good. The vote of the honest man is counterbalanced by that of the 
most dishonest knave, that of the most intelligent, by that of the most 
ignorant. The opportunities are the same for degradation and for eleva- 
tion. It is a free-for-all struggle between the good on one side and the 
bad on the other. 

Now, what are the means which the good may use to overcome the 
bad, to create such desires in the masses that the tendency of our insti- 
tutions may be upward? The press, powerful as it is, belongs little more 
to the good than to the bad. The stage yields more to the sentiments of its 
patronage than it adds to the creation of higher sentiments, and politics 
does likewise. The rostrum, however, puts forth ni"-t of its effort in the 
elevation of sentiment, while the pulpit in all its great power strives to 
accomplish the same result- 'bit both the rostrum and the pulpit labor 
under the very serious disadvantage of having to deal with matured 
minds, with characters whose habits are somewhat firmly established, 
and consequently these agencies do not accomplish results commensu- 
rate with the efforts put forth. All these instrumentalities, unaided by 
more elHoicnt means, are not able oven to check the downward tendency 
of our civilization. The most out husiastie patriot, seeing. the wellare of 
his country to depend alone upon these agencies, would throw up his 
hands in despair. 

Fortunately there is one means greater t ban all t h se acting in harmo- 
ny with them, by the influence of which our progress has thus far been up- 
ward. It has been very generally observed that intelligence is a neces- 
sary quality in a useful citizen. It has idso boon observed that an intel- 
ligent man with bad motives or uncontrolled desin s is much more to be 
dreaded than the man \\ ho is ignorant, and, hence another, a controlling 
quality must be added to intelligence in the make-up of a good citizen. 

It will readily be admitted that the school- are the greatest factor in 
the formation of intelligence among the masses. They take the young 
minds which are yet plastic and mould them into shape with the greatest 
ease and facility. Their aim is correct formation rather than reforma- 
tion. They go direct ly at the process of building up character without 
lirst hav ing to break; down a great number of habits and prejudices 
already established. Reformat ion is a slow, unnatural, unprofitable way 
of getting reliable men; formation is rapid, natural, sure. lint the 

schools .which aim only at intelligei do not occupy the highest rank 

among the means for making good citizens of a republic. True, iu tell f- 
gonee, a correct knowledge of truth, has much to do in making men 
moral, useful citizens, yet it must lie admitted that those schools whose 
highest aim is to give to intelligence moral self-control exert a still 
greater influence in the process. The public schools, being controlled by 
the sentiment of the masses, have not yet a much higher aim than to 
make young people intelligent, and hence the value and necessity of 
private and denominational schools, controlled by a higher sentiment 
than that pervading the masses. The fact is certainly patent that 
Christian institutions produce the best citizens, and their point of excel- 
lence lies in the fact that they give the. intelligence a controlling power 
which directs if to the most useful ends. 

Then, as means for elevating the standard of citizenship we must 



8 



honor the rostrum, the pulpit, the press, the public school; but most of 
all must we do reverence to the private and denominational schools 
whose highest aim is the formation of character. Of all institutions 
Which tend to make good citizens and elevate the character of the re- 
public these are most worthy. It is pleasant to know that in this highest 
class of institutions stands Spiceland Academy. May her supporters 
become stronger and her influence for good greater and greater. 
December, 1890. 



Athletics at tlpe Acadcir)y. 

The ideal education is a threefold process, mental, moral and physi- 
cal. The Academy i- not behind in any of these. The Field Day last 
June gave us an impetus which is -till felt. Foot ball has been enthusi- 
astically engaged in during the beautiful weather of the past fall. The 
Athletic Assoeia t ion has he en re orga ijized, and men a re already in tra til- 
ing for the sports of Kit' hi Day next spring. Systematic practice and ex- 
ercise during the winter months Will tell wonderfully at the dual con- 
test, and those who ate most persistent in following out this line of work 
will carry oil' the honors. W'e have men who are competent to make the 
very best records, and we are not fearful of the outcome. The manage- 
ment is in hearty accord with this movement., and desires to promote the 
athletic interests in the Spiceland Academy in every way possible. 



Personal Mention. 

William ('. It idgeon, class of '75, is principal of Friends' Academy, 
Washington, Kan. He is also preaching considerably. 

£5. J. Wright, a former teacher in the Academy, is principal of the 
Springport schools, and we have good reports from his work. 

Prof. John K. Parker is book-keeper for the Abernathy Furniture Co., 
Kansas City, and reports the work pleasant. His many friends will be 
glad to learn of his good position. 

We are. sorry to b arn that Mr. lloebet' is at his home, Spring-port, in 
a critical condition with limp; trouble. His work will he remembered 
very pleasantly hy all w ho came in contact with him while connected 
with the Academy, and lie has the host w ishes of a host of Spicelanders. 

Mrs. II. K. Davis and Miss Carrie Cnthank are both studying at the 
University of Michigan this, year, and report pleasant and profitable 
work. 

Miss Katie Sheridan, our primary teacher for several years, severed 



9 

; her connection with the Academy the first of November to take work in 
'the Indianapolis schools. Cynthia Fries, of No. 3, has been placed in 
charge of the primary work, and Virginia Griffin, of the class of '84, has 
charge of No. 3. Since Miss Sheridan must leave, we congratulate our- 
selves on being able to make such satisfactory arrangements. 

County Superintendent F. A. Cotton has issued a neat, full and in- 
structive County Manual, lie is making a very eflicient superintendent, 
and is deservedly popular with his teachers. 

We wish to express our appreciation for favors from the business 
men of Spiceland, whose advertisements appear in this paper, and com- 
mend them to all our readers who have needs in their lines. TlTE Be- 
pokteii wishes all honorable enterprises in Spieeland abundant pros- 
perity. 

Kstella Symons, a former student of the Academy, is now in the High 
School at Lawrence, Kansas. 

The lime-honored literary societies connected with the Academy 
have ceased to exist a< such, but have been consolidated into one society 
called the "Triumvirate," composed of both ladies and gentlemen. The 
society has started out under favorable auspices, and is composed of good 
working members. It lias boon arranged so the members of the new so- 
ciety have the use of the libraries as formerly. \\"c wish the society 
abundant prosperity, and hope the Triumvirate may live to do much 
good. Students can hardly overestimate the value of the culture gained 
ina literary society. A former studeni of the Academy writes as fid- 
lows: "I l'e< l that I owe everything to (he training gained in the literary 
society at Spiceland. I count that that train hig placed me in the position 
I now occupy." Students should think carefully before they decide they 
have not time for this w oi k. 

Not among the least of Spiceland's favorable surroundings is the 
Christian Hndeavor Society. This society now numbers about seventy 
active members, and the meetings are always well attended by the young 
people of the neighborhood. The movement has been a great help to the 
school as well as to tin; neighborhood at large. .Many of the student- 
are actively engaged in the work of the committees. The meetings oc- 
cur at G o'clock each Sabbath evening, to which all who are interested 
will be cordially welcomed. 

Tint lecture course will be opened by Prof. I). W. Dennis, of Karlham 
College, on Saturday evening, December 2()th,on "The Strength of Rome/' 
Prof. Dennis comes from a year's residence and study abroad, and the 
lecture will be a rich treat. Oilier lectures w ill follow later in thoseason. 

Wo are glad to announce to our friends and former students that the 
Academy is now in possession of the astronomical instruments owned 
by the late William Dawson. This adds a new inducement for the study 
of astronomy, for the class will have the use of one of the best telescopes 
in the country. When properly mounted, our students and friends will 
from time to time have free access to view the wonders of the starry 



10 



heavens. This purchase was made possible by the liberality of many 
friends and former students, and by the energy and perseverance of Prof. 
Edwin E. Starbuek and Mrs. Mil t tie E. White, who were so successful in 
securing the means necessary. The purchase was made at an expense of 
about .tloO. 

Few schools in this part of the country have sueh good library facili- 
ties as we possess. Besides the dictionaries, cyclopedias and numerous 
books for reference, our students have access to about 1,000 boohs in the 
two society libraries, and in the Academy library there are about 1,500. 
All these libraries are well selected, and are very helpful to the school. 
The librarians should be kept busy. 



Some Things YYe Claim. 

We invite the attention of teachers, parents, and all who are inter- 
ested in educational matters, to the benefits and opportunities offered by 
the Spiceland Academy. All wea.sk is that you investigate our claims. 
We suggest the following things for you to think about: 

1. The pleasant location of the school in one of the most desirable 
towns in the gas belt. 

2. The equipment of the school for good, solid work. 

The apparatus, specimens, and appliances for work in science. 

4. The moral tone of the community. 

5. Excellent libraries and reference books. 

(;. Personal supervise!) and oversight of pupils. 

7. The arrangement of the course of study, so that students can enter 
at any lime and work to suit. 

H. Superior advantages for normal training. 

<). The social advantages offered to students. 

10. Expenses are reasonable. 
I n addition to the foregoing inducements, the Spring Term, beginning 
April 0., ISO!, is a 

Sl'KC'IAI. NO KM A I. TKItM. 

In the regular Academic Department, classes will be taught in Trigo- 
nometry, three classes in Latin, three classes in Algebra, General History, 
Zoology, Rhetoric, Botany, Moral Science, English Literature, Civil 
Government, Philosophy of History, Mental Science and Physical Ge- 
ography. Classes w ill be taught in all the common school branches, 
Composition and Book-Keeping. For the bone fit of Teachers and those 
preparing to teach, Normal Review classes will be formed in all the 
legal brandies, in which instruction will be given in methods of teaching, 
as°well as a thorough review of all tin- principles of 'these studies. Spe- 
cial attention will be given to the teaching of English and methods for its 
presentation. 

Daily recitation will be held in the Science and Art of Teaching and 
Mental Science, in each of which classes the practical problems and dif- 
ficulties of the school room will he freely discussed. 

Much thought and care have been given to meet the needs of teach- 



; : li 

ers and those preparing for teaching, in arranging die course of study. 
Besides the review work, much of the High School work is of very great 
importance to teachers, and has direct relation to their school work. 
Students can enter any classes for which they are prepared, and other 
classes not named will be formed if there is sufficient demand. 

The term is of sufficient length to enable students to do food, per- 
manent work. In the Normal Course it is not intended to conduct a 
scheme of cramming for examination, but it is our intention to help 
teachers in their schools quite as much as to aid them to get good licen- 
ses. A scries of talks will be given in this course on school management 
methods of instruction ami the practical work of school teaching." 

If you wish to take Review Work, if you wish to take a Normal 
Course, if you wisli to take Advanced Work, or if you wish a regular 
Academic Course, we invite your attention to the advantages we otTer 
believing that if your wants lie among any these lines, we are better able 
to satisfy them than ever before. If, however, you wish to complete a 
college course in a few weeks, you bad better eo elsewhere. We desire 
to stand for that which is permanent and useful, being opposed to shams 
and pretensions in education. 

This term is specially lilted for those who have taken a grammar 
school diploma, and for those who have been teaching during the winter 
months. Make your arrangements now to attend. Visit us if possible 
or write for further information. Terms reasonable and satisfaction' 
guaranteed. 

For information, call on or address: 

THOMAS NKWLIN, Sup't. 



Teach i 1 1 q Maime rs. 

We are glad to transfer to these columns the following sensible sug 
gestjons upon an important part of the teacher's work. We wish to coin 
mend it to the consideration of teachers and pupils alke. Let us not 
neglect the weightier matters of the law. 

"Many people complain of the decay of the old time courtesv and sav 
that the boys and girls of to-day are lacking in the elements of good 
breeding. Really refined parents sometimes ignore their duty and leave 
the teaching of politeness to other agencies. 

"It is right here, then, that the teacher's opportunity begins. Some mav 
thmk that to attempt to teach manners would be a waste of the pupil's 
time, that he had better be doing sums or parsing. ()„ the contrary 
these lessons may be the most important ones the pupil learns Tile 
whole child should be sent to school, and the whole child should receive 
attention while there. 

"The teacher should give lessons on behavior in the street, in public 
places, m the parlor, and even on the playground. Hints about dress the 
care of the hair, the nails, the teeth, will also come under the subject of 
manners. J 

"The teacher should also try to remedy any defect, as a squint, a sloven- 



12 



ly gait, a habit of stooping, taking care, of course, that his words do not 
give offense. This could bo done better in private. 

"There should be drills about the proper way of entering and leaving 
a room, receiving visitors, performing introductions, etc. They should 
also be taught how to write notes of invitation, acceptance, and regret. 

"The teacher should be careful that they return thanks for favors 
received, that they ask to be excused when obliged to pass before people, 
that they do not interrupt one another, or snatch things, or crowd to be 
first. 

"They should lie taught that these t hinge are impolite because they are 
selfish. The difference between well-bred ami ill-bred people should he 
pointed out, ami some man or woman of perfect breeding might be held 
up as an example. 

"The careful teacher will watch the pupils' manner of addressing one 
another. He will make them see how much better "good morning" 
sounds than "hello.'' He will dissuade tin; boys from saying Pill and 
Pete, and teach the girls that Mary and Sarah sound better than Maine 
and Sade. In a word, he will teach them to respect themselves and one 
another. 

"I u this way politeness will become popular. The pupils will set a 
watch upon themselves, and there will be good manners, not only in the 
school-room, but also on the playground". 



I'iooks niicl l^eudiiio-. 

FiiOM MA N V SOUIIGES. 



The value of books manufactured in the United States in 1871 is. esti- 
mated at ••M(>,000,000— ;(,">()() volumes appearing in that year alone. Probably 
not less than 2">,0()0 new books appear every year now. An experienced 
reader, Lenglet dil Fresuoy, says that nobody could read more than 000 
folio volumes in a lifetime. To keep up to the present annual reinforce- 
ment to literature of books alone would require the reading of about 68 
volumes a day, without allowing for reading up the books already pub- 
lished histories, classics, etc 

A great book that comes from a great thinker— it is a ship of thought 
dee], freighted with truth, with beauty, too. It sails the ocean, driven by 
the winds of heaven, breaking the level sea of life into beauty where it 
goes, leaving behind it a train Of sparkling loveliness, widening as the 
ship "nes on. And what a treasure it brings to every land, scattering the 
seeds of truth, justice, love, and piety, to bless the world in ages yet to 
come!— 77,< "-/»/<' l'arl.ir. 

Read not to contradict and confute, nor to believe and lake for grant- 
ed nor to find talk and discourse, but to weigh and consider. Some books 
are to be tasted, others to be swallowed, and some few to be chewed and 
digested" that is, some books are to be read only in parts; others to be 
read, but not seriously ; and some few to be read wholly and with dili- 
gence and attention— Lord Bacon. 



13 



Kvory book that we take up without a purpose Is an opportunity lost 
of taking up a book with a purpose; every bit of stray information which 
Ave cram into our heads without any sense of its importance is for the 
most part a bit of the most useful information driven out of our heads 
and choked off from our minds. — Frederick Ilarrixun. 

To-day it is reading that furnishes both news and knowledge to the 
people at large, and that moulds their opinions and determines their ac- 
tions. Conversation is a meager appendix to the use of hooks, periodi- 
cals, or newspapers, and is seldom much besides a retailing of what they 
have furnished. — I. Curtis At mi/. 

i f a book conies from the heart, it wi 1 1 contrive to roach other hearts ; 
all art and author-craft are of small account to that. — Thomas Carlgk. 

A good book is the precious life-blood of a master spirit, embalmed 
and treasured up on purpose to a lite beyond life. — John Milton. 

In order that pupils may acquire a taste for good literature, there 
must be an organized effort to influence their reading from the lirst. 
There is ample testimony that the pupils of our public schools can be 
taught to appreciate the best literature, and for the best abandon the 
worst or the indifferent. lint it is also certain that they must be taught. 
Such preference for the hist seldom comes of itself. 1 1 is not enough 
that- school-houses are built and books furnished gratuitously to pupils, 
nor that free libraries are at every man's door. What every good book 
in the hands of a child needs, is a good teacher behind it — a living per- 
sonal influence, as constant, as active, and as well systematized as any of 
the regular work of the schools, directing the reading of every youth 
until his judgment, matured by age and good associations, shall uner- 
ringly direct him, to the best fields of literature.— Hubert C. French. 



L^eacli i)<*" in the Lower Cir.idcs. 

VlKOlNIA CJH1K1-TX. 

As in every branch taught, each lesson must be prepared and made 
attractive, and more, there should be a purpose in every lesson. These 
facts are so potent that they need no further comment. 

The fact that so great a per cent, of all the knowledge acquired 
through life is gained from books, makes the subject of vital importance. 
Seldom before the pupil reaches the fourth year of his work has he ac- 
quired sufficient skill in reading to get thoughts readily from the print- 
ed page, unless it be particularly adapted, by the use of large type ami 
short and easy words, to his use. I iidced, often after this period the task is 
a very laborious one ; but, as a rule, the average child is, by this time, ready 
to begin ordinary reading. 

'flu; grading of most of our schools considered, there is no year after 
the fourth when the pupil can devote so much id' his time during school 
hours to reading; not that there is not much else to require his time then. 
The eye needs continual training. The sight is not sufficiently accurate 



14 

is \v)\y there is so much trouble in looking from tho book without awk- 
ward pauses. Quickness of sight may bo helped by reading the lesson 
backward, every other word, words in columns, numbers, etc. Lessons 
read from the board, the child's own work ami that of his fellows, will all 
be some help, and give drill in reading script. Allowing- pupils to ex- 
change work not only gives drill in reading, but a practical example of 
the use of capitals and punctuation marks, for it is hard to read another's 
work when not properly written. The importance of sight reading can 
hardly bo over estimated. One book or paper is sufficient for the class, 
lie sure that the selection is not too difficult for the average, of the class 
to read with ease. Let one pupil read a paragraph and pass the paper to 
the next. "With a little care this can be done so nicely that the interrup- 
tion will be very slight. The advancement of pupils under this kind of 
drill is remarkable, for it cultivates tin' closest attention, and any pupil 
is chagrined to have his paragraph read by another because his own 
reading was not well understood. 

After a sight lesson, or any other, the suggestive words may be used 
as an interesting memory test. 

Pronounce a few of the suggestive words, and see if they (ran not be 
used exactly as they were in the lesson. 

If a word has been used in more than one sense this is a good time to 
impress the fact. If it can he used in more, then the occasion is equally 
opportune. 

These facts help to lay a foundation for seeking beauty in language 
by choice of words. Selections written on the hoard and "cut up" les- 
sons are often very useful. Pictures of lessons, especially poetry, often 
makes a lesson very attractive, and are good to keep the imagination 
active. A teacher who has very little ability to draw, can sketch a lesson 
so that it will not only he more impressive, but more instructive. 

The children are easy to please. In sketching before the class it is 
usuallv more interesting for the pupil to suggest what is to be drawn. 

When done outside the class keep the board covered with a map or 
chart until time to recite, then have the pupil select the verse or para- 
graph which the drawing illustrates. Children will soon be anxious to 
illustrate their own lessons. 

To allow a pupil to show the difference, by motives, between contrast- 
ed words, as rush and glide, throw and place, is sometimes helpful in 
getting a good (one on such words. 

Good questions are alwaysuseful. The aim in questioning is not, usu- 
ally, to lead pupils to grasp the hare thought. If new words have been 
properly explain. -d when the lesson was assigned, that has already been 
done, hut to aid him in general thong ht-gotting, so that he will be better 
able to grasp thought for having recited that lesson. Not that he is not 
to understand what is directly expressed, but if what is indirectly sug- 
gested is brought out, the direct must necessarily be understood, and he 
will also have a clearer insight into language. 

Hence, I would not question upon those things directly given, unless 
I am merely seeking data by which to determine an indirectly suggested 
thought, or to find if the lesson has been carefully read. Remembering 
that one of the chief aims in teaching reading is to develop thought 



15 



power, wo shall find that mental acuteness is rapidly stimulated by bnng- 
ino- out what each one has discovered half unconsciously, behind and 
beyond the words. To form an opinion is to grow mentally, and the 
child is always pleased when he is abb- to do this. 

Deal with the lesson itself; keep the class fixed upon it. Do not in- 
troduce thoughts that are foreign to the subject in hand. 

It is a question whether it is always a proper thing to tell a pupil to 
read like he talks. So many have such loose habits of pronunciation 
that in some cases it seems far more in place to tell a pupil to talk like 

hC Tfter all methods are discussed it is the teacher who, in addition to 
some natural ability, has a heart in the work, win. will be a succe ss. The 
high ideal set before the teacher, is to aid in the development of deal 
thinking— In broadening the intellectual horizon. 



Kduc.'itioiptl Notes. 

It is a matter worths of congratulation that three of America's most 
no |,lo women and best' public speakers, Mrs. Mary A. Livermore, Hiss 
Francos K. Willard ami Mr-. Mary II. 'hint are of late speaking so fre- 
quently and so sensibly on educational topics before teachers institutes 
in New Knghvnd a rid the Kasiem States. Thoinfiucii.ee of such women 
will be very great, and speaks for better thin-- in our school-,. 

Wisconsin had a school issue in the last election; it was an Ameri- 
can question as well. The question was whether American children 
should lie taught the American language in American schools. The 
American school house was buried under »>,<KKJ ballots. The German 
Lutherans and the German and Polish Catholics did it. It is a sad state 
of affairs; and will work sad havoc with the school-, it is feared. 

In the present Congress, of the seventy-six senators, thirty have a 
college education and forty-six have been educated in the lower schools. 
Of the three hundred and thirty-three representatives and territorial 
delegates, one hundred and eight are college men, and two hundred and 
twenty-live are not. This is a fine showing for the ability of college 
men, when it is known that only one-half of one percent, of those eligible 
to (Congress are college men. This one-half of one per cent, gains forty 
per cent, of the senator-hips and thirty-two percent, of the congressional 
delegation. This is a large premium on advanced education. 

In Massachusetts there were, last year, 2,2X7 commitments to prism, 
of youth under 20 years of age, and 0,(571 between 20 and 25. Tin-.' K.OC'O 

are altogther too near the sc .1 age to make the contemplation 

of the fact aggrceable. They were not all, nor nearly all, from the pub- 
lic schools, but some teachers must grieve over them. 

Literary people do not all starve in these days. Howe] Is gets $15,000 
from the Harpers and Gidler $10,000 from the Century. Will Carleton 
makes $10,000 out of his poems and lectures, and Mrs. Burnett's stories 
bring her a snug $8,000 a year. The sales of Lew Wallace's "lien Hur" 



16 



have reached 103,000 copies, and his royalties afford him an assured in- 
come. 

In the United States every two hundredth man takes a college 
course; in England, every five hundredth; in Scotland, every sixth hun- 
dredth, and in ({ermany, every two hundred and thirteenth. The United 
States is the only country in the world which spends more money upon 
education than on war or preparation for war. 



Local Items. 

The day before Thanksgiving the High-School and Grammar School 
gave a very pleasant, and appropriate literary entertainment, consisting 
of declamations, songs and essays, all relating to the Thanksgiving sea- 
son. 

On December 17 the same departments held a AVhittier Memorial ex- 
ercise, in memory of the poet's eighty-third birthday. A great deal of 
enthusiasm was aroused in the life and works of this grand old man. 
The following letter was read from the poel : 

Am usm; k<i, 12, 5, 1890. 

M v Dka it Kkiks i), 
Thomas X e w \a n : 
Owing to illness I am only able to thank thee for thy kind letter, and 
to say that I am pleased to be remembered by the students of Spiceland 
Academy on Hie occasion of my birthday. Asa Friend T am glad to 
send greeting to a Friends' School. Jon x 0. Wm i'iti eb. 

In addition to the Township Institute work which our teachers join 
heartily in, they are studying together Compayre's Psychology this year, 
and meeting lor recitation and consultation once a week. Many benefits 
are derived from these conferences. 

On the evening of December 19 the Triumvirate Society gave a very 
pleasant and instructive literary entertainment, which was enjoyed by 
all present, and spoke wi ll for the society. Following the; literary exer- 
cises, a social was held which closed the evening to the satisfaction of 
all. The evening's entertainment was a success. 

The Henry < ounty Teachers' Association will meet at New Castle on 
Friday and Saturday, January 23rd and 2-lth. The Thanksgiving meet- 
ing was omitted this year, and it was decided to hold but one meeting 
during the. year. Let us make t bis a large, enthusiastic and profitable 
meeting. 

The chemistry class this year has done more laboratory work than 
heretofore. A class in advanced chemistry will be organized during the 
winter term. Their work will be principally qualitative analysis. 

The High School this term is the largest in the history of the Academy 
The Senior class numbers ten, and it is hoped that Ida Cude, who was 
compelled to drop out last year on account of poor health, can join the 
class, making eleven for graduation. 



I 7 



Helps for Pupils. 

The greatest help that a teacher can render to a pupil is to make him 
able to work alone. Teachers should heed the advice given by Philip to 
Aristotle When he sent his son Alexander to him for instruction : ".Make 
yourself as useless as possible to my son." It is a great mistake to re- 
gard inforniKtion as more valuable than character. Pupils and teachers 
alike sometimes conclude that the entire good of the school comes from 
the recitation of the assigned lessons. This certainly is not to be ignored. 
The living teacher should be the greatest help accessible to the pupil, but 
the force of the teacher should be expended most in organizing the other 
resources of the school. The end and object of education should be to 
enable the individual to know himself and the world, and thereby to see 
the relationship which he bears to the world. The school studies cer- 
tainly should Ire an aid to this end, and yet it is well known that a per- 
son may make a good record in school and entirely fail to know himself, 
the world or the relation between these two. The pupil must know more 
than text- hook knowledge. The school m us I he t rai ncd to work t > iget her, 
to think together aioiitr suggested lines ol thought. The teacher must 
send the pupil to dictionaries, to reference hocks, to libraries, to living 
men and to nature; thus he w ill become an investigator, and w ill find 
out what men, hooks and natim; have that w ill -apply his needs. 

Most of that which we call culture i- to be gained apart from the 
text-book recitation. The opening exercises each morning should tend 
to this end. The writing of compositions, and the reciting of memory 
gems and declamations all tend to the. same end. Some time should be 
alotted in every school for general exercise of various kinds in which the 
pupils will talk and think together about things directly connected with 
arithmetic, geography or grammar. Much time and thought should be 
given to get our pupils to think outside the grooves of the daily recita- 
tions. Some suggestive lines of work for the upper grades are American 
literature, current history, civil government, political systems and econ- 
omic science questions. For the lower grades object lessons from na- 
ture are always at hand and always helpful. These things will help the 
pupils to help themselves, and this is ideal teaching. 




PHINTEO AT THE BANfJEF? OFFICE, KmGHTSTOWH, IND. 



18 



WINTER TERM commences January 5,1891. 

Special NORMAL and REVIEW TERM of Twelve weeks, begins 
April 0, 1891. 

For terms and all information, address, 

Tl IOMAS NEWLIN, Supt, 

Spiecluncl, Ind, 




Where will be found Fresh and Salt Meats, Sausage, Veal and Mutton. 
Everything which you might expect to find in a first class Meat Market. 
All fixtures new and ( lean. Satisfaction guaranteed. 



J. C. GILMORE. 



•v-The+M i 1 i i kan+House,-* 



T. K. Al I 1.1. 1 KAiN, P.roi>rictor. 



First class House in every particular. Board by the day or week. 
Terms reasonable. 



: "1 ^ 



1 1\ \ 



3 



I; 



LIVERY, FEED & SALE STABLE, 



JI1 



SPICELAND, IND, 



A full line of first class rigs constantly on hand at reasonable rates. 
HEARSE and CARRIAGE TEAMS a specialty. Best Sample and Pic- 
Nic Wagon in the county. 

BOARDING by the week or month at reasonable rates. 

Stable in close proximity with the Millikan House. 



19 




EAST END 

VT7 D V 






The place to buy cheap, first 
class goods. 

PRGK & G©., 



JIXON 



THIS- 



DRUGGIST AND BOOKSELLER. 

Headquarters for 

Drugs s 

Druggist's Sundries, 
Oils. 

Paints, 

Sehool A^P Miscellaneous Booi^s, 

SCHOOL SUPPLIES, 

And everything usually kept in a well regulated Drug and Book Store. 

Prices reasonable. 



20 \ 

FOR- 



Your Holiday Goods 

()() TO 

'Gj^lhG (gloved ^OPltQPf 

KEPT J'.V 

OFFETT & HODSON. 



They have a full lino of Holiday Goods, such as FANCY and MTXET) 
C\NDIKS Nl'TS, ORANGES, FIGS, and DATES; also a nice lot of 

DOLLS, TOYS, 

Wo also 'carry a large s tock of 

STAPLE GIROGE^IES 

and will not bo undersold by any ono. Wo would be pleased to show you 
our stock and qtioto prices. 



JACOB HILL CLARKSON CHARLES. 



«v7<w$a a^^h, v?:- 3 ""^ 5/?^^ fl?® 

it 3 OJnL iSSJn 

C tf< ),oerioB and 

CI yris trims 

Candies 

at bottom prices. Special bargains In 

GLASS and QUEENS WARE 

until after the Holidays. Having contracted our CANNIOI) GOODS 
b^ore the advance in prices, enables us to give you SPECIAL BAR- 
(i \I\S. We respectfully solicit a liberal patronage. 

HILL & CHARLES. 

HOVER'S CORNER. 



21 



C. W. RAT L IFF, 

WATCHMAKER and JEWELER. 
Dealer la Sewing Machines. 



Spiceland Meat Market 

FRESH MEATS of All kinds. Lard and Sausage. 
FRESH FISH in their season. 

Butchering done to order on reasonable terms. Give us a call. 

J. L. COPE LAND. 



C. H. BRANDY, 

JFie §pieeland Sarber. 

Hair-Cutting and Sharing done with neatness and despatch. Shop over Nixon's 
Drug Store. (Jive him a call. 



J. STIGLEMAN, Jr., 

M A N l ! KACTU 11 K H O V 

Washers, Ash, Oak, Cherry and Walnut Cupboards, 
finished light and antique. Custom Scroll and Re- 
sawing done to order. Exterior and interior finish 
wood finished ready to nail up. Odd jobs a specialty. 



M. & E. SCOVILLE 



WILL SKLL 



IT 




Cheaper than they can be bought any- 
where in the county. They keep the 
best ^onds and sell them at the lowest 
prices. 

Owing to a later trade than usual for 
the time of year, they have from time to 
time replenished their stock with those 
goods which have been most desirable 
during the season. 

For the remainder of the year we will 
sell at prices entirely satisfactory to you 



Large Silk Mufflers, 99 cents. 

Silk Handkerchiefs, 80 cents. 

Full line all wool Hosier, 20 cents. 

Beautiful assortment of Neck Wear, at 20c. 

Ladies' Shoes a specialty. 

Full line of 

STAPLE Qf^Y GOODS. 

Give us a call. 

FOSTER'S STORE, 



THE- 




Have fur -ali a large manlier of 

Pi tie 1 >u i k ! i lur T ots 
ii * 

IN 

SOUTj-1 SIDE /cDDITIOJM. 

These iuts are \v ii 1 1 : 1 1 • •< I ami vill 1"' sold at reasonable prices. The terms 
lire: Out' third cash, i iv third in one vi a,' ami one third in two years, \\ it 1 1 six 
per emit iiiti rest < >i> deferred payments. Tin.' lot -. in South Side A i lit ion an- selling 
rapiilly, over one-third of them having been sold in sixty d;iys. Many houses are 
iioVV ill course of ci'u'tion in this Addition, iind the coming sirring ui.l see an 
iminmisr nttio'int i f building mid improveini nl. 

The company also have, abo.Ul T SV i-JNT V-K! V K At'MiS 'OF VLKY VALUA- 
BLE HEAL, I'.STA'l i: not yet plotted, situated 

{sf&e r the Sig ©lass p&efory, 

' ihrttln y are oilVring in lots of suitable sjy.e to suit tin* purchaser. 

(Jreat Iiargains can bo bought in Hi is r»:\l Instate. .Men of capital are investing 
in Lots in South Siil** Addition, knowing it to 1m 1 a safe investment and bound to 
make moiii-y. Tli" Lois arc bound to rise in price. Lots in South Side Addition 
have already miM at an advance of thirty per cent in twenty four hours. If you 
w i'.h to make a 

or gel you ;i 1mm 1 ' in desirable booming town, buy some Loth of the 

Spiceland Land Company, 



at SIM CKLA X D, the town being -it u at" I in a rich natural gas lield. 



> 




OCT 75 

N. MANCHESTER,